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Introduction: 1st Grade Curriculum

Discover the topics covered in your child’s 1st Grade classroom and ways to continue this learning at home.
 

Learning Benefits

In many ways, 1st grade is a year of important transitions; children leave behind much of the play of preschool and kindergarten and dive into developing deeper academic skills.  1st graders progress from having beginner reading and writing skills to becoming beginning readers and writers, as they read and write more with greater comprehension and ability.  

First grade is a crucial year for building reading skills. In 1st grade students begin to define themselves as what kind of readers they are. More specifically, research has shown that the most effective and successful 1st grade classrooms are those which are very positive places, encouraging reading and writing and conveying the message “You can be a reader,” to the students. While this is being done in the classroom, it can certainly be done at home too.

In1st grade there is also a change in the classroom structure from that of preschool and kindergarten. The 1st grade classroom is usually organized more like a traditional elementary school classroom, with tables and desks at which students spend more of their time. However, in most classrooms there is still a meeting area for lessons and class discussions as well as areas or centers dedicated to different subjects of learning.  For instance, there may be an area with all of the math tools and supplies as well as a class library dedicated to reading. Technology also becomes a more important part of the 1st grade classroom as students learn about and use it more.

The transition to more extensive learning, with less play time and more “sitting time” is a very significant one. Keep in mind that your child will need to adjust to this new learning environment. He may get tired at the end of the day or have trouble focusing as the day progresses. It is important to check with your child’s teacher on your child’s progress and work together to develop strategies if your child is having trouble adjusting, especially at the beginning of the year. At home, give your child time to rest after school or allow him to play and exert his energy before school in the morning. Most importantly, give your child the time to adjust. Like any person dealing with change, taking the time to get used to a new environment is crucial. The same applies to the development of skills. Not all 1st graders become readers and writers overnight; different children learn at different paces, especially in 1st grade when there are many changes and many new skills to acquire. Again, consult with your child’s teacher on your child’s progress and inquire if there is extra work or supplemental help that could be beneficial. 

Don’t forget to check out our extensive resources on homework help for 1st Grade here.

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