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September 27, 2009

Classroom Website 101

By Victoria Jasztal
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

    It all started when I visited Heather Renz's website in 2004, I believe. Mrs. Renz (http://www.mrsrenz.net) is a fourth grade teacher in Redmond, Oregon who has a plethora of resources for her students and teachers as well as a motivational club called the Mastery Club. She focuses on math brain teasers and has photos of her students' projects. After one visit to her website, I was hooked on the concept of having my own site. I had been designing websites in general since 1998, so it was not going to be a challenge, necessarily. I just needed to think about the content I would include. In July 2005, http://www.teachingvision.org became a reality in cyberspace.

    Over the past four years, the website has evolved quite a bit. Since then, I have posted more of my students' work online and added widgets (interactive sidebars) to my website that spark a great deal of interest among my students, their parents, my colleagues, and teachers from all over the world. Today's post will discuss starting a classroom website (it is never too late) and adding different kinds of content to the site.

    Starting a Website

    Starting a website is an immense challenge, particularly if you have never done it before. However, there are several websites out there that have templates and do not cost any money to maintain.

    • http://www.edublogs.org- With Edublogs, you can maintain a classroom weblog and add pages to your website for other content. It is well-organized and includes a variety of templates.
    • http://www.shutterfly.com- Perhaps you would rather start by just including a photo album of your class projects, field trips and lessons. I have been using Shutterfly for the past two years to put photos of my students online. However, before you start any websites like these, please ask your parents for permission to place photos with their child in them online.
    • http://www.weebly.com- This is an organized, very professional looking website where you can create a free website with a weblog.  
    • http://www.wix.com- Here is yet another website builder where you can put together professional-looking Flash websites for free.

    You may from then need to know a few important things-

    • Sensory overload= bad, very bad. Keep the design of your website simple enough where visitors do not have to stare at clashing backgrounds and listen to midi music where they do not have the option of turning the music off. Also, posting "This Page Under Construction" signs is so very 1999. (My students would think that is ancient because they were born in 1998, 1999 and 2000.)
    • There are guides that teach you HTML (the language of website formatting) if you need to use it for anything on your website. Lissa Explains it All has been online for more than ten years, yet it is probably one of the top three most useful websites on the Internet for HTML coding. You may need to use HTML at times to make text bold, italic, or underlined. You may also want to place a picture in a specific place or include a few widgets on your website, which requires inserting or writing HTML. 


    Design in itself-

    Many people have asked me how I designed my website. The layout was made using Adobe Photoshop CS. I really cannot go into how I create images here, yet there are many tutorials online for how to maneuver Photoshop. Even better, if you do not have Photoshop and cannot get a program like it in any way, there is a website online that works a great deal like Photoshop called http://www.pixlr.com

    Content-

    My website includes a great deal of content- I spend time during summer break working on it. First, I feel an About the Teacher page is essential. Additionally, you may then desire to upload photos of student projects, include links that direct students to websites for a variety of topics, have a page for pen pals to visti (if you participate in a pen pal program, of course), upload podcasts, incorporate videos, and much more. A few websites I strongly admire are that of Mrs. Bunyi and Mrs. Newingham (both from Teaching Matters here at Scholastic), as well as Mr. Coley, Ms. Jensen, Ms. SanchezMrs. ShawMrs. Sunda and Mrs. Venosdale.

    Here are some examples of content at my website-

    IMG_3562

     

    A scroll box for updates that is designed to look like an iPod

    IMG_3566

    Samples of educational music (Rockin' the Standards and Mr. Duey) using a widget from Amazon.com.

    IMG_3565

    A Twitter update widget- If you have a Twitter account, you can click on a few possible widgets and receive the HTML code to insert the box anywhere you would like in your classroom website.

    IMG_3569

    I also located a widget here at Scholastic for the Teacher Book Wizard, which parents can use at my website as well to locate books for their children. They can find books on their levels as well as books similar to ones they have been reading from our classroom library.

    IMG_3570

    You can also create polls at your website where people can vote. The website where I created the poll pictured above is http://www.polldaddy.com.

    IMG_3571

    I think it is also neat for students to see where our visitors come from. The world map from ClustrMaps captures their interest.

    IMG_3572

    I also link to many QTVR (QuickTime Virtual Reality) and interactive websites where students can go on virtual field trips without even leaving our classroom.

    IMG_3575

    This is our website hosted at Shutterfly- the particular URL is http://msjasztalsfourthgrade.shutterfly.com. I used to upload pictures to our classroom website, yet it took up a lot of space and I did not have a particular album to place them in. This website provides an easy template where you can upload hundreds of pictures quickly without having to worry about the format of your page.

    IMG_3574

    Another component is our Cranium Commanders website where students can answer a variety of questions for points. Our class has not used it the last two years like in prior years, yet we plan on using it again in the near future. The idea came from Mrs. Renz's Mastery Club, and you can use any questions or content if you would like to include Cranium Commanders on your website.


    If you have any questions about creating a classroom website, please ask! This is a question I have received many, many times, so I would not mind answering any questions here to help as many people as possible to create a website for their students, parents and colleagues to visit. Also, if you have a website you would like to share or seek advice about, link to it in the comment section below!

     

    It all started when I visited Heather Renz's website in 2004, I believe. Mrs. Renz (http://www.mrsrenz.net) is a fourth grade teacher in Redmond, Oregon who has a plethora of resources for her students and teachers as well as a motivational club called the Mastery Club. She focuses on math brain teasers and has photos of her students' projects. After one visit to her website, I was hooked on the concept of having my own site. I had been designing websites in general since 1998, so it was not going to be a challenge, necessarily. I just needed to think about the content I would include. In July 2005, http://www.teachingvision.org became a reality in cyberspace.

    Over the past four years, the website has evolved quite a bit. Since then, I have posted more of my students' work online and added widgets (interactive sidebars) to my website that spark a great deal of interest among my students, their parents, my colleagues, and teachers from all over the world. Today's post will discuss starting a classroom website (it is never too late) and adding different kinds of content to the site.

    Starting a Website

    Starting a website is an immense challenge, particularly if you have never done it before. However, there are several websites out there that have templates and do not cost any money to maintain.

    • http://www.edublogs.org- With Edublogs, you can maintain a classroom weblog and add pages to your website for other content. It is well-organized and includes a variety of templates.
    • http://www.shutterfly.com- Perhaps you would rather start by just including a photo album of your class projects, field trips and lessons. I have been using Shutterfly for the past two years to put photos of my students online. However, before you start any websites like these, please ask your parents for permission to place photos with their child in them online.
    • http://www.weebly.com- This is an organized, very professional looking website where you can create a free website with a weblog.  
    • http://www.wix.com- Here is yet another website builder where you can put together professional-looking Flash websites for free.

    You may from then need to know a few important things-

    • Sensory overload= bad, very bad. Keep the design of your website simple enough where visitors do not have to stare at clashing backgrounds and listen to midi music where they do not have the option of turning the music off. Also, posting "This Page Under Construction" signs is so very 1999. (My students would think that is ancient because they were born in 1998, 1999 and 2000.)
    • There are guides that teach you HTML (the language of website formatting) if you need to use it for anything on your website. Lissa Explains it All has been online for more than ten years, yet it is probably one of the top three most useful websites on the Internet for HTML coding. You may need to use HTML at times to make text bold, italic, or underlined. You may also want to place a picture in a specific place or include a few widgets on your website, which requires inserting or writing HTML. 


    Design in itself-

    Many people have asked me how I designed my website. The layout was made using Adobe Photoshop CS. I really cannot go into how I create images here, yet there are many tutorials online for how to maneuver Photoshop. Even better, if you do not have Photoshop and cannot get a program like it in any way, there is a website online that works a great deal like Photoshop called http://www.pixlr.com

    Content-

    My website includes a great deal of content- I spend time during summer break working on it. First, I feel an About the Teacher page is essential. Additionally, you may then desire to upload photos of student projects, include links that direct students to websites for a variety of topics, have a page for pen pals to visti (if you participate in a pen pal program, of course), upload podcasts, incorporate videos, and much more. A few websites I strongly admire are that of Mrs. Bunyi and Mrs. Newingham (both from Teaching Matters here at Scholastic), as well as Mr. Coley, Ms. Jensen, Ms. SanchezMrs. ShawMrs. Sunda and Mrs. Venosdale.

    Here are some examples of content at my website-

    IMG_3562

     

    A scroll box for updates that is designed to look like an iPod

    IMG_3566

    Samples of educational music (Rockin' the Standards and Mr. Duey) using a widget from Amazon.com.

    IMG_3565

    A Twitter update widget- If you have a Twitter account, you can click on a few possible widgets and receive the HTML code to insert the box anywhere you would like in your classroom website.

    IMG_3569

    I also located a widget here at Scholastic for the Teacher Book Wizard, which parents can use at my website as well to locate books for their children. They can find books on their levels as well as books similar to ones they have been reading from our classroom library.

    IMG_3570

    You can also create polls at your website where people can vote. The website where I created the poll pictured above is http://www.polldaddy.com.

    IMG_3571

    I think it is also neat for students to see where our visitors come from. The world map from ClustrMaps captures their interest.

    IMG_3572

    I also link to many QTVR (QuickTime Virtual Reality) and interactive websites where students can go on virtual field trips without even leaving our classroom.

    IMG_3575

    This is our website hosted at Shutterfly- the particular URL is http://msjasztalsfourthgrade.shutterfly.com. I used to upload pictures to our classroom website, yet it took up a lot of space and I did not have a particular album to place them in. This website provides an easy template where you can upload hundreds of pictures quickly without having to worry about the format of your page.

    IMG_3574

    Another component is our Cranium Commanders website where students can answer a variety of questions for points. Our class has not used it the last two years like in prior years, yet we plan on using it again in the near future. The idea came from Mrs. Renz's Mastery Club, and you can use any questions or content if you would like to include Cranium Commanders on your website.


    If you have any questions about creating a classroom website, please ask! This is a question I have received many, many times, so I would not mind answering any questions here to help as many people as possible to create a website for their students, parents and colleagues to visit. Also, if you have a website you would like to share or seek advice about, link to it in the comment section below!

     

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