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October 16, 2012

The Leaves Are Falling

By Tiffani Mugurussa
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    For the past two weeks, we have been reading books about fall. As I started perusing my book tubs, I realized I have a lot of autumn-themed books, so I’ve gone through all of my library tubs to create a special one just for the season. I also realized I own a lot of listening centers that revolve around Halloween — almost too many. I will have to plan carefully if I want to get all of them in during October.

     

     

     

     

    This week at the listening center we will be hearing the story The Scarecrow's Hat and then following it up with a scarecrow dot-to-dot. In the coming weeks we will listen to:

    I’m glad October is a long month because I have so many wonderful activities and projects planned. Below are a few of the activities we have already completed. 

    We began our study of fall by reading and discussing The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree and followed the reading by drawing pictures of fall.

     

    After reading Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf by Lois Ehlert, we made torn tissue-paper leaves. To make them, students painted leaf shapes with a mixture of glue and water, then added small pieces of red, yellow, and orange tissue paper. 

     

     

       

     

    Leaf Man is another beautiful picture book by Lois Ehlert. After reading the story, we took a walk through the school and collected leaves. I also asked students to bring in their own leaves to show and share and to use for our art projects. We used all of the collected leaves to create our own versions of leaf man. We didn’t have berries or nuts like the one pictured in the book, so we improvised and used googly eyes. I was pleasantly surprised at how they turned out. They are so cute and have so much character.

     

     

    Leaf Man  Leaf Man

     

    Scarecrow's HatGreat Glyphs The Scarecrow’s Hat is another great picture book. After reading this book, the students each made a scarecrow glyph from the book Great Glyphs: All About Me. Glyphs are a great way to use art while creating and analyzing data. This particular glyph involved students needing to know their birthday. This led to a discussion about which season their birthday occurs in. We will be creating a seasons of birthdays graph next week.

    Scarecrow Glyph

    Here is a list of other great fall books and a few activities to go with them:

    • I Am a Leaf — After reading this story, we made an anchor chart to display what we had learned about leaves.
    • We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt — A class favorite and a must-read before you take your class on a leaf hunt.
    • Why Do Leaves Change Color? — After reading this book, my students chose leaves to use in doing a leaf rubbing with crayons.
    • There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves! — Students love to chime in with the repetitive text as you read.
    • Fall Leaves Fall! — A great book to get students talking about what they like to do with the leaves. I used the book and the sentence frame I like to ____ leaves. I gave my ELD students word choices like collect, rake, or jump in.

    This month I am also using a few ideas from two old, but wonderful Scholastic books, Thematic Units for Kindergarten and Building Literacy With Interactive Charts. Both of these books have been great resources for ideas and extension activities. 

    Next week we will continue with our investigation of fall and begin our study of pumpkins. What activities do you do in the fall with your class? I look forward to reading your responses. 

    For the past two weeks, we have been reading books about fall. As I started perusing my book tubs, I realized I have a lot of autumn-themed books, so I’ve gone through all of my library tubs to create a special one just for the season. I also realized I own a lot of listening centers that revolve around Halloween — almost too many. I will have to plan carefully if I want to get all of them in during October.

     

     

     

     

    This week at the listening center we will be hearing the story The Scarecrow's Hat and then following it up with a scarecrow dot-to-dot. In the coming weeks we will listen to:

    I’m glad October is a long month because I have so many wonderful activities and projects planned. Below are a few of the activities we have already completed. 

    We began our study of fall by reading and discussing The Seasons of Arnold's Apple Tree and followed the reading by drawing pictures of fall.

     

    After reading Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf by Lois Ehlert, we made torn tissue-paper leaves. To make them, students painted leaf shapes with a mixture of glue and water, then added small pieces of red, yellow, and orange tissue paper. 

     

     

       

     

    Leaf Man is another beautiful picture book by Lois Ehlert. After reading the story, we took a walk through the school and collected leaves. I also asked students to bring in their own leaves to show and share and to use for our art projects. We used all of the collected leaves to create our own versions of leaf man. We didn’t have berries or nuts like the one pictured in the book, so we improvised and used googly eyes. I was pleasantly surprised at how they turned out. They are so cute and have so much character.

     

     

    Leaf Man  Leaf Man

     

    Scarecrow's HatGreat Glyphs The Scarecrow’s Hat is another great picture book. After reading this book, the students each made a scarecrow glyph from the book Great Glyphs: All About Me. Glyphs are a great way to use art while creating and analyzing data. This particular glyph involved students needing to know their birthday. This led to a discussion about which season their birthday occurs in. We will be creating a seasons of birthdays graph next week.

    Scarecrow Glyph

    Here is a list of other great fall books and a few activities to go with them:

    • I Am a Leaf — After reading this story, we made an anchor chart to display what we had learned about leaves.
    • We’re Going on a Leaf Hunt — A class favorite and a must-read before you take your class on a leaf hunt.
    • Why Do Leaves Change Color? — After reading this book, my students chose leaves to use in doing a leaf rubbing with crayons.
    • There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves! — Students love to chime in with the repetitive text as you read.
    • Fall Leaves Fall! — A great book to get students talking about what they like to do with the leaves. I used the book and the sentence frame I like to ____ leaves. I gave my ELD students word choices like collect, rake, or jump in.

    This month I am also using a few ideas from two old, but wonderful Scholastic books, Thematic Units for Kindergarten and Building Literacy With Interactive Charts. Both of these books have been great resources for ideas and extension activities. 

    Next week we will continue with our investigation of fall and begin our study of pumpkins. What activities do you do in the fall with your class? I look forward to reading your responses. 

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