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September 25, 2018

Pumpkin Pi: Fall Celebrations and Circumference

By Stacey Burt
Grades 3–5, 6–8

    Peanut butter and jelly, salt and pepper, tried and true — some things just “go together.” For instance, pumpkins and fall, it just makes sense. While planning for the upcoming weeks, I wanted to incorporate activities that involved pumpkins into my math lessons. During my research, I ran across a photograph of a pumpkin carved with the Pi symbol in it, and that started the ball rolling. “Pumpkin Pi,” I loved it!

    Using the photograph as a jumping off point, I was inspired to take “booing” (leaving gifts anonymously for others with the assumption that the recipient will “boo” another family, and so on) and adapted it for my sixth grade math classes. By combining “booing” and circumference I thought I might be onto something.

    My math classes are going to start the tradition of “Pi-ing” other classes this year. We have created a poem for the class to read before eating their goodies and a sign to post outside their classroom door to let others know that they have been “Pied.” While our upper grades have probably had an introduction or some practical experience with using Pi, I thought it would be a great introduction to circumference for the younger students. The goodies the students are given are round (peanut butter cups, cookies, etc.) and the idea is that the “Pied” class will have to calculate the circumference of their goodies before consuming them; the poem helps. Also included in the poem is that the class now has the responsibility to “Pi” another class (anonymously, of course).

    I've included links to the poem and a copy of the sign to put with the class goodies. I reworked the traditional “Boo-ed” poem and you will need to change the name of the school to fit your setting. Hope you enjoy the activity and have a wonderful fall.

    Download Pi-ed poem

    Download Pumpkin Pi classroom sign

    Perfect Pi Resources:

    The Librarian Who Measured the Earth

    Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone

     

    Peanut butter and jelly, salt and pepper, tried and true — some things just “go together.” For instance, pumpkins and fall, it just makes sense. While planning for the upcoming weeks, I wanted to incorporate activities that involved pumpkins into my math lessons. During my research, I ran across a photograph of a pumpkin carved with the Pi symbol in it, and that started the ball rolling. “Pumpkin Pi,” I loved it!

    Using the photograph as a jumping off point, I was inspired to take “booing” (leaving gifts anonymously for others with the assumption that the recipient will “boo” another family, and so on) and adapted it for my sixth grade math classes. By combining “booing” and circumference I thought I might be onto something.

    My math classes are going to start the tradition of “Pi-ing” other classes this year. We have created a poem for the class to read before eating their goodies and a sign to post outside their classroom door to let others know that they have been “Pied.” While our upper grades have probably had an introduction or some practical experience with using Pi, I thought it would be a great introduction to circumference for the younger students. The goodies the students are given are round (peanut butter cups, cookies, etc.) and the idea is that the “Pied” class will have to calculate the circumference of their goodies before consuming them; the poem helps. Also included in the poem is that the class now has the responsibility to “Pi” another class (anonymously, of course).

    I've included links to the poem and a copy of the sign to put with the class goodies. I reworked the traditional “Boo-ed” poem and you will need to change the name of the school to fit your setting. Hope you enjoy the activity and have a wonderful fall.

    Download Pi-ed poem

    Download Pumpkin Pi classroom sign

    Perfect Pi Resources:

    The Librarian Who Measured the Earth

    Sir Cumference and the Sword in the Cone

     

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