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October 7, 2009 Mole Day: Celebrating Amedeo Avogadro’s Number with Style By Stacey Burt
Grades 6–8

    As you consider upcoming fall and winter celebrations and holidays, I would like to remind you about National Mole Day. It is recognized every year on October 23rd from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m. to commemorate Amedeo Avogadro’s number (6.02 X 10^23), which is an international measuring unit in chemistry and/or moles (a scientific mole is a very large number used to count very small things, like atoms and molecules).

    As you consider upcoming fall and winter celebrations and holidays, I would like to remind you about National Mole Day. It is recognized every year on October 23rd from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m. to commemorate Amedeo Avogadro’s number (6.02 X 10^23), which is an international measuring unit in chemistry and/or moles (a scientific mole is a very large number used to count very small things, like atoms and molecules).

     

    Mole Day was the brainchild of a high school chemistry teacher in a 1980’s article published in The Science Teacher journal. High school chemistry teacher, Maurice Oehler, established the National Mole Day Foundation in 1991, in an attempt to promote the idea of celebrating Mole Day. Today schools around the world celebrate Mole Day, an unofficial holiday, to engage young minds in the study of chemistry.

     

     

    There are several creative ways to celebrate Mole Day. Listed below are links to sites that will provide much more information than I could possibly list in this simple blog post. I am also including links to articles that cover the history of and information pertaining to moles in general. I might also suggest that celebrating Mole Day could be done in math classes as well as science classes as the mole is a unit of measurement, it simply represents a number.

     

    http://www.visionlearning.com/library/module_viewer.php?mid=53&l=&c3=

    http://www.moleday.org/index.htm

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_Day

    http://amolelottafun1023.blogspot.com/2007/10/history-of-mole.html

    http://www.thecatalyst.org/forum/moleionaire/moleionaire.html

     http://www.ehow.com/about_5384670_history-mole-day.html#

    http://www.google.com/searchq=history+of+mole+day&hl=en&rlz=1T4RNWK_enUS287US287&tbs=tl:1&tbo=u&ei=pnjMSvSPD9SMtgfEucjfAQ&sa=X&oi=timeline_result&ct=title&resnum=11

    I hope these websites encourage you and your students to celebrate Mole Day in your classroom or  school this year. From jokes, skits, and costumes to breakfast celebrations and songs written by students, Mole Day is the opportunity to expose your students to an extremely large number and its purpose while generating an interest in chemistry at the same time.

    Have fun and I hope your Mole Day celebration is a “moleicious” success!

     Stacey

    As you consider upcoming fall and winter celebrations and holidays, I would like to remind you about National Mole Day. It is recognized every year on October 23rd from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m. to commemorate Amedeo Avogadro’s number (6.02 X 10^23), which is an international measuring unit in chemistry and/or moles (a scientific mole is a very large number used to count very small things, like atoms and molecules).

    As you consider upcoming fall and winter celebrations and holidays, I would like to remind you about National Mole Day. It is recognized every year on October 23rd from 6:02 a.m. to 6:02 p.m. to commemorate Amedeo Avogadro’s number (6.02 X 10^23), which is an international measuring unit in chemistry and/or moles (a scientific mole is a very large number used to count very small things, like atoms and molecules).

     

    Mole Day was the brainchild of a high school chemistry teacher in a 1980’s article published in The Science Teacher journal. High school chemistry teacher, Maurice Oehler, established the National Mole Day Foundation in 1991, in an attempt to promote the idea of celebrating Mole Day. Today schools around the world celebrate Mole Day, an unofficial holiday, to engage young minds in the study of chemistry.

     

     

    There are several creative ways to celebrate Mole Day. Listed below are links to sites that will provide much more information than I could possibly list in this simple blog post. I am also including links to articles that cover the history of and information pertaining to moles in general. I might also suggest that celebrating Mole Day could be done in math classes as well as science classes as the mole is a unit of measurement, it simply represents a number.

     

    http://www.visionlearning.com/library/module_viewer.php?mid=53&l=&c3=

    http://www.moleday.org/index.htm

     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mole_Day

    http://amolelottafun1023.blogspot.com/2007/10/history-of-mole.html

    http://www.thecatalyst.org/forum/moleionaire/moleionaire.html

     http://www.ehow.com/about_5384670_history-mole-day.html#

    http://www.google.com/searchq=history+of+mole+day&hl=en&rlz=1T4RNWK_enUS287US287&tbs=tl:1&tbo=u&ei=pnjMSvSPD9SMtgfEucjfAQ&sa=X&oi=timeline_result&ct=title&resnum=11

    I hope these websites encourage you and your students to celebrate Mole Day in your classroom or  school this year. From jokes, skits, and costumes to breakfast celebrations and songs written by students, Mole Day is the opportunity to expose your students to an extremely large number and its purpose while generating an interest in chemistry at the same time.

    Have fun and I hope your Mole Day celebration is a “moleicious” success!

     Stacey

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