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April 27, 2010

Linking Non-Fiction Works to Blog Posts

By Stacey Burt

     
    With the end of the school year quickly approaching, I would like to link some non-fiction literature to a few blog posts from earlier in the year. It makes sense to use good books to support some of the lesson ideas and strategies presented in these posts. The titles I have selected are all available from the Scholastic Teacher Book Wizard, and are currently in stock.



    G is for googol


    David M. Schwartz does an excellent job of introducing and elaborating on mathematical terms and ideas in this alphabet math book. G is for Googol supports math terms used in the blog ideas from Pumpkin Pi: Fall Celebrations and Circumference, Surface Area and Geodesic Domes, and Circumference + Bubbles = Too Much Fun. The illustrations are entertaining and enhance the topics being presented. I use this book as supplemental material when I introduce/review Pi. It is a great resource for reinforcing mathematical vocabulary and at $6.95, I often give it as door prizes when I am presenting at conferences or providing in-service to other educators. 

    Every minute on earth 


    Written by a former middle and high school teacher and his son, this book is full of fascinating things that can and do happen within one minute on our planet. Steve Murrie used these facts to make learning fun for his students and I use them today as conversation starters at the beginning of science or math classes. Often these startling facts lead to debates and some interesting “what if” discussions and are great for grabbing students’ attention and segueing into the daily lesson. 

    Snow


    This book supports the Snow Day! blog I wrote back during the days of heavy snow and time off from school. Rich in information about the formation of individual flakes to how to construct an igloo, I find that is a great supplemental piece to the activities surrounding snow that were mentioned in the blog. Illustrations are very appealing (even to sixth graders) and information is presented in a logical and easy to digest manner. Choosing parts of this book to share with my students before conducting snow experiments leads them to ask for the book after the experimentation is complete.

    Save the planet 


    Finally, You Can Save the Planet: 50 Ways you Can Make a Difference, supports the blog from April 8th surrounding Earth Day. I have found that today’s students understand the idea that they are the future stewards of our planet, a mission most take very seriously. This book provides them with strategies for cleaning up their local environment as well as suggestions for improving practices of local businesses that impact the environment. During the days leading up to Earth Day I read excerpts from this book to my students to empower them and reassure them that they CAN make a difference.


    I hope you can use some of these great titles in your classroom library. I know that your students will enjoy them as much as you will enjoy sharing them.

    All the best- Stacey

     
    With the end of the school year quickly approaching, I would like to link some non-fiction literature to a few blog posts from earlier in the year. It makes sense to use good books to support some of the lesson ideas and strategies presented in these posts. The titles I have selected are all available from the Scholastic Teacher Book Wizard, and are currently in stock.



    G is for googol


    David M. Schwartz does an excellent job of introducing and elaborating on mathematical terms and ideas in this alphabet math book. G is for Googol supports math terms used in the blog ideas from Pumpkin Pi: Fall Celebrations and Circumference, Surface Area and Geodesic Domes, and Circumference + Bubbles = Too Much Fun. The illustrations are entertaining and enhance the topics being presented. I use this book as supplemental material when I introduce/review Pi. It is a great resource for reinforcing mathematical vocabulary and at $6.95, I often give it as door prizes when I am presenting at conferences or providing in-service to other educators. 

    Every minute on earth 


    Written by a former middle and high school teacher and his son, this book is full of fascinating things that can and do happen within one minute on our planet. Steve Murrie used these facts to make learning fun for his students and I use them today as conversation starters at the beginning of science or math classes. Often these startling facts lead to debates and some interesting “what if” discussions and are great for grabbing students’ attention and segueing into the daily lesson. 

    Snow


    This book supports the Snow Day! blog I wrote back during the days of heavy snow and time off from school. Rich in information about the formation of individual flakes to how to construct an igloo, I find that is a great supplemental piece to the activities surrounding snow that were mentioned in the blog. Illustrations are very appealing (even to sixth graders) and information is presented in a logical and easy to digest manner. Choosing parts of this book to share with my students before conducting snow experiments leads them to ask for the book after the experimentation is complete.

    Save the planet 


    Finally, You Can Save the Planet: 50 Ways you Can Make a Difference, supports the blog from April 8th surrounding Earth Day. I have found that today’s students understand the idea that they are the future stewards of our planet, a mission most take very seriously. This book provides them with strategies for cleaning up their local environment as well as suggestions for improving practices of local businesses that impact the environment. During the days leading up to Earth Day I read excerpts from this book to my students to empower them and reassure them that they CAN make a difference.


    I hope you can use some of these great titles in your classroom library. I know that your students will enjoy them as much as you will enjoy sharing them.

    All the best- Stacey

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