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May 4, 2010

Epic Year, Epic Flooding

By Stacey Burt

    (AP Photo/The Tennessean, John Partipilo) 



    As I began this week’s blog, I am struck by the influence water (in one form or another) has had on me, both professionally and personally, this school year. Snow, ice, and plain old rain have been the culprit for canceling 7 days of school this year, but perhaps today’s closure is the saddest.


    It is being reported that Nashville and surrounding areas will not see flooding of this magnitude for another 100 years. As I write this, the Cumberland River (which runs through downtown Nashville) still has not yet reached its crest. In Murfreesboro, we are lucky; very little flood damage has been reported. I am reminded how fragile life is and how powerful and unforgiving water can be. Growing up on the gulf coast, I am all too familiar with the damage a hurricane can wreak on a community. Which leads to the next catastrophe, the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? Even with clean up efforts I am afraid that we won’t have safe seafood from the Gulf for years.

    Nashville2

    Ryan Clark, a student at Tennessee State University, helps others near Vanderbilt campus in Nashville, Sunday, May 2, 2010. (AP Photo/The Tennessean, Shelley Mays)


    It’s ironic how unexpected event(s) can change the best made plans. My students only have 18 more days of 6th grade left and I am now rethinking the plans I had made for the end of the year. I am not for certain, but feel that my students will want to plan some sort of relief effort for those impacted by flooding only 20 to 30 minutes away. I plan on blogging tomorrow after I meet with my students to update you and let you know how my students and I will plan for the remaining part of year. Thanks for checking in this week and please come back Wednesday for an update and for some of my favorite ideas and projects for closing out the year.

    All the best-

    Stacey

    (AP Photo/The Tennessean, John Partipilo) 



    As I began this week’s blog, I am struck by the influence water (in one form or another) has had on me, both professionally and personally, this school year. Snow, ice, and plain old rain have been the culprit for canceling 7 days of school this year, but perhaps today’s closure is the saddest.


    It is being reported that Nashville and surrounding areas will not see flooding of this magnitude for another 100 years. As I write this, the Cumberland River (which runs through downtown Nashville) still has not yet reached its crest. In Murfreesboro, we are lucky; very little flood damage has been reported. I am reminded how fragile life is and how powerful and unforgiving water can be. Growing up on the gulf coast, I am all too familiar with the damage a hurricane can wreak on a community. Which leads to the next catastrophe, the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? Even with clean up efforts I am afraid that we won’t have safe seafood from the Gulf for years.

    Nashville2

    Ryan Clark, a student at Tennessee State University, helps others near Vanderbilt campus in Nashville, Sunday, May 2, 2010. (AP Photo/The Tennessean, Shelley Mays)


    It’s ironic how unexpected event(s) can change the best made plans. My students only have 18 more days of 6th grade left and I am now rethinking the plans I had made for the end of the year. I am not for certain, but feel that my students will want to plan some sort of relief effort for those impacted by flooding only 20 to 30 minutes away. I plan on blogging tomorrow after I meet with my students to update you and let you know how my students and I will plan for the remaining part of year. Thanks for checking in this week and please come back Wednesday for an update and for some of my favorite ideas and projects for closing out the year.

    All the best-

    Stacey

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