Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
August 28, 2018

Helping Students Develop a Lifelong Love of Reading

By Sharon Taylor
Grades PreK–K

    We know the importance of laying down a strong reading foundation for our early learners and part of that means making books a central part of their school life. But beyond the classroom walls, when faced with the allure of television and video games, how can we make sure that our students continue good reading habits? Read on as I share ideas to help your students develop a lifelong love of reading despite these distractions.

    Classroom Library

    Library

    Make your classroom library a warm and inviting place for kids. When you create a welcoming environment, students are more likely to want to spend time there. I add personal touches such as plants, rugs, curtains, and a bench to my library.

    Empower your students by giving them choice in their reading material. There are so many books on so many topics, with diverse characters, set in different places. Your classroom library needs to be stocked with a wide selection of books in order to keep your students' interest at a high level and to appeal to each and every student. For more tips on organizing your classroom library, read "The 11 Essentials for an Effective Classroom Library." If you need help finding and leveling books for your students, try the Scholastic Book Wizard.

     Read to Your Students

    DSC_0391

    A surefire way to lure your students into loving books is to read to them. Kids of all ages enjoy being read to. Channel your inner Meryl Streep or Denzel Washington and try using different voices for the characters and narration. Don't be afraid to be silly. Kids will love it and you will help the book make a deeper, more lasting impression. You might even dress up in character to make the story really come alive. I also invite parents to come in and read to the students.

    If you are casting about for some riveting reads to animate in your classroom, look no further than this comprehensive Best Read Alouds Book List!

    Book Reports

    Book reports are a wonderful way for students to develop and practice their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. It also helps them explore new genres and share books with other people, both of which prod them towards becoming passionate about reading. After my students visit our classroom library, they complete a short book report about their book and later share it with the class. The report includes the title of the book, the author, and drawings to illustrate the characters, and setting. Scholastic Teachables has a useful book report template to make it all easier.

    For enrichment you could also have students create a poster or a display for their chosen book. Then, organize a book fair where students can share their presentations. You may want to invite other classes or open the event to family and friends.

    Whisper Phones

    DSC_0389

    Students in my class love using whisper phones during silent reading time. Before using them I found that many students had difficulty reading silently. This method allows my students to whisper into their phones while reading without disturbing those around them. The phones also provide an incentive for my reluctant readers and have helped to improve reading rate and fluency.

    Turn Reading Into a Game!

    Here are two of my favorite games to play with books: 

    Name That Book

    Play this game to revisit some of your class’s favorite books. 

    • On index cards, record characters, favorite lines, or other important information from the books.
    • Divide your class into teams.
    • Read the information you recorded and let teams of students take turns naming the corresponding book.
    • Award one point for every correct title.

    My Favorite Book Game

    I use the My Favorite Book game to encourage students to think and read. For this game, I select one child to choose his or her favorite book from the class library. I allow the student to sit in our author’s chair and continue by asking him why this book was his favorite, what his favorite part of the story was, and any other questions I can think of. Then, I read the book to the class, making sure to explain that the book is special because it is “____’s favorite.” This game helps students understand that books are special and should be treated with love and respect. 

    D.E.A.R

    One of the best ways to get your students to develop a love of reading is to set aside a portion of your day for D.E.A.R (Drop Everything And Read). During this time, everyone — including you, the teacher — reads. D.E.A.R will encourage your students to read today, tomorrow, and every day. Visit the D.E.A.R. site for more information on how you can start this program in your classroom.

    Reading books about books will help get your students motivated and ready to read, too. Take a look at some of my favorite books about books:

    I hope these strategies will help motivate your students.  Remember to have fun with your kids and read, read, read!!

    We know the importance of laying down a strong reading foundation for our early learners and part of that means making books a central part of their school life. But beyond the classroom walls, when faced with the allure of television and video games, how can we make sure that our students continue good reading habits? Read on as I share ideas to help your students develop a lifelong love of reading despite these distractions.

    Classroom Library

    Library

    Make your classroom library a warm and inviting place for kids. When you create a welcoming environment, students are more likely to want to spend time there. I add personal touches such as plants, rugs, curtains, and a bench to my library.

    Empower your students by giving them choice in their reading material. There are so many books on so many topics, with diverse characters, set in different places. Your classroom library needs to be stocked with a wide selection of books in order to keep your students' interest at a high level and to appeal to each and every student. For more tips on organizing your classroom library, read "The 11 Essentials for an Effective Classroom Library." If you need help finding and leveling books for your students, try the Scholastic Book Wizard.

     Read to Your Students

    DSC_0391

    A surefire way to lure your students into loving books is to read to them. Kids of all ages enjoy being read to. Channel your inner Meryl Streep or Denzel Washington and try using different voices for the characters and narration. Don't be afraid to be silly. Kids will love it and you will help the book make a deeper, more lasting impression. You might even dress up in character to make the story really come alive. I also invite parents to come in and read to the students.

    If you are casting about for some riveting reads to animate in your classroom, look no further than this comprehensive Best Read Alouds Book List!

    Book Reports

    Book reports are a wonderful way for students to develop and practice their reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. It also helps them explore new genres and share books with other people, both of which prod them towards becoming passionate about reading. After my students visit our classroom library, they complete a short book report about their book and later share it with the class. The report includes the title of the book, the author, and drawings to illustrate the characters, and setting. Scholastic Teachables has a useful book report template to make it all easier.

    For enrichment you could also have students create a poster or a display for their chosen book. Then, organize a book fair where students can share their presentations. You may want to invite other classes or open the event to family and friends.

    Whisper Phones

    DSC_0389

    Students in my class love using whisper phones during silent reading time. Before using them I found that many students had difficulty reading silently. This method allows my students to whisper into their phones while reading without disturbing those around them. The phones also provide an incentive for my reluctant readers and have helped to improve reading rate and fluency.

    Turn Reading Into a Game!

    Here are two of my favorite games to play with books: 

    Name That Book

    Play this game to revisit some of your class’s favorite books. 

    • On index cards, record characters, favorite lines, or other important information from the books.
    • Divide your class into teams.
    • Read the information you recorded and let teams of students take turns naming the corresponding book.
    • Award one point for every correct title.

    My Favorite Book Game

    I use the My Favorite Book game to encourage students to think and read. For this game, I select one child to choose his or her favorite book from the class library. I allow the student to sit in our author’s chair and continue by asking him why this book was his favorite, what his favorite part of the story was, and any other questions I can think of. Then, I read the book to the class, making sure to explain that the book is special because it is “____’s favorite.” This game helps students understand that books are special and should be treated with love and respect. 

    D.E.A.R

    One of the best ways to get your students to develop a love of reading is to set aside a portion of your day for D.E.A.R (Drop Everything And Read). During this time, everyone — including you, the teacher — reads. D.E.A.R will encourage your students to read today, tomorrow, and every day. Visit the D.E.A.R. site for more information on how you can start this program in your classroom.

    Reading books about books will help get your students motivated and ready to read, too. Take a look at some of my favorite books about books:

    I hope these strategies will help motivate your students.  Remember to have fun with your kids and read, read, read!!

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Sharon's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
Tips on Implementing Guided Reading Lessons
Guided reading helps teachers tailor instruction to meet each student'€™s specific reading needs. Read on as I share some helpful tips on implementing guided reading lessons in your classrooms.
By Sharon Taylor
August 7, 2018
Blog Post
A Teacher's Guide to Celebrating Summer
Summer is here, and it is time for you to kick up your feet and relax! Join me as I share a few tips on how to make the most of your summer break!
By Sharon Taylor
June 1, 2012
Blog Post
A Summer Survival Kit for Future 1st Graders
The end of the school year is finally here! Join me as I share a few ideas you can use to help prepare your students for a fun and educational summer.
By Sharon Taylor
May 25, 2012

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us