Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
January 11, 2016

Stone Soup: A Lesson in Sharing

By Shari Carter
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Stone Soup is a great book to read this time of year! You and your students are just back from winter break — an ideal time to reinforce the importance of sharing in your classroom.

    There are lots of different versions of Stone Soup out there. The two that I have used with my class and are my very favorites, are the ones written by Ann McGovern and Heather Forest. They are similar stories, but also have a lot of differences which make them perfect book choices to do compare and contrast lessons with your students.

     

    In McGovern’s version of Stone Soup, there is a young boy who is very hungry from his travels. He discovers a large house where an old lady is living and stops to ask if she has any food to spare. The old lady tells the boy that she has nothing she can give him to eat. The young boy then asks her for a stone and then a pot, and tells the old lady that he will make soup from a stone. The old lady is so curious, that she gets caught up in his directions for making stone soup and the boy tricks her into making a meal for him.

     

    Stone Soup by Heather Forest, is an enlightening story about sharing and the effect it can have on others. When two weary travelers come into a wealthy village, all the inhabitants deny them a meal. The two travelers publicly declare that they will make soup from a stone. Out of curiosity, the villagers provide all the ingredients, one-by-one, to make the soup. After all the villagers have made their contributions and pronounce the soup delicious, they learn that the real “magic” behind this soup is sharing! 

     

    Stone Soup Craftivity

     

    • To get started, I drew and hand-cut all the ladles for my kinders — I thought the ladles would be pretty difficult for them to do on their own.

    • Next, each child got one piece of small (9" x 12"), black construction paper for their pot. All they had to do was round two of the corners to resemble a pot.

    • Finally, they cut out the shapes of a stone and vegetables, adding details with a sharpie. Then they added their veggies to the pot (one by one) using the construction paper that I pre-cut into small squares and rectangles. 

     

    Grocery List

    Use this grocery list template to help your students recall vegetables and the order they were added in the story. Children often see adults writing lists, and they see that lists are useful and meaningful. I find that lists are also easier to write for my kindergartners. Lists give students practice concentrating on one big idea. 

     

    Compare and Contrast

    Teachers know that graphic organizers are powerful tools in learning. Drawings and diagrams engage visual learners. Research has shown that when students identify similarities and difference of stories they read, it takes their learning/understanding to an even higher level. This is the anchor chart we made after we read two different versions of Stone Soup.

     

    Reader’s Theater

    After reading Stone Soup, it would be a lot of fun to have your students perform the story with a reader’s theater production.  eReader’s Theater is a great resource for reader's theater scripts as well as extension ideas, costumes, and more. The plays are only $1.99 per download. There are two different levels to choose from for Stone Soup scripts.

     

    Soup From a Stone . . . Fancy That!

    We ended our week by making our very own stone soup, and what fun it was! The kids loved “helping” me make our magical soup. As the day progressed and the soup cooked, our room was filled with the most delicious smell!  We started first thing in the morning and put all the ingredients (including the stone, of course!) into a slow cooker on low, and by the end of the day, our stone soup was ready. The kids gobbled it up — many of them even wanted a second helping. I never knew that a wonderful story like this could inspire my little ones to eat so many vegetables!

    Click HERE for a recipe to make stone soup in your class.

    I hope you and your students enjoy making stone soup and doing these fun activities just as much as we did! 

     

    Additional Resources from Scholastic Printables

    For more great activities, download a Stone Soup mini-book and worksheet for your students to write their very own soup recipes. 

    Don't forget to subscribe to my blog on Scholastic Top Teaching if you would like to get my latest posts delivered right to your inbox. 

    Thanks for reading, stay warm, and I’ll see you here next time!

    Hugs,

    Shari 

     

     

    Stone Soup is a great book to read this time of year! You and your students are just back from winter break — an ideal time to reinforce the importance of sharing in your classroom.

    There are lots of different versions of Stone Soup out there. The two that I have used with my class and are my very favorites, are the ones written by Ann McGovern and Heather Forest. They are similar stories, but also have a lot of differences which make them perfect book choices to do compare and contrast lessons with your students.

     

    In McGovern’s version of Stone Soup, there is a young boy who is very hungry from his travels. He discovers a large house where an old lady is living and stops to ask if she has any food to spare. The old lady tells the boy that she has nothing she can give him to eat. The young boy then asks her for a stone and then a pot, and tells the old lady that he will make soup from a stone. The old lady is so curious, that she gets caught up in his directions for making stone soup and the boy tricks her into making a meal for him.

     

    Stone Soup by Heather Forest, is an enlightening story about sharing and the effect it can have on others. When two weary travelers come into a wealthy village, all the inhabitants deny them a meal. The two travelers publicly declare that they will make soup from a stone. Out of curiosity, the villagers provide all the ingredients, one-by-one, to make the soup. After all the villagers have made their contributions and pronounce the soup delicious, they learn that the real “magic” behind this soup is sharing! 

     

    Stone Soup Craftivity

     

    • To get started, I drew and hand-cut all the ladles for my kinders — I thought the ladles would be pretty difficult for them to do on their own.

    • Next, each child got one piece of small (9" x 12"), black construction paper for their pot. All they had to do was round two of the corners to resemble a pot.

    • Finally, they cut out the shapes of a stone and vegetables, adding details with a sharpie. Then they added their veggies to the pot (one by one) using the construction paper that I pre-cut into small squares and rectangles. 

     

    Grocery List

    Use this grocery list template to help your students recall vegetables and the order they were added in the story. Children often see adults writing lists, and they see that lists are useful and meaningful. I find that lists are also easier to write for my kindergartners. Lists give students practice concentrating on one big idea. 

     

    Compare and Contrast

    Teachers know that graphic organizers are powerful tools in learning. Drawings and diagrams engage visual learners. Research has shown that when students identify similarities and difference of stories they read, it takes their learning/understanding to an even higher level. This is the anchor chart we made after we read two different versions of Stone Soup.

     

    Reader’s Theater

    After reading Stone Soup, it would be a lot of fun to have your students perform the story with a reader’s theater production.  eReader’s Theater is a great resource for reader's theater scripts as well as extension ideas, costumes, and more. The plays are only $1.99 per download. There are two different levels to choose from for Stone Soup scripts.

     

    Soup From a Stone . . . Fancy That!

    We ended our week by making our very own stone soup, and what fun it was! The kids loved “helping” me make our magical soup. As the day progressed and the soup cooked, our room was filled with the most delicious smell!  We started first thing in the morning and put all the ingredients (including the stone, of course!) into a slow cooker on low, and by the end of the day, our stone soup was ready. The kids gobbled it up — many of them even wanted a second helping. I never knew that a wonderful story like this could inspire my little ones to eat so many vegetables!

    Click HERE for a recipe to make stone soup in your class.

    I hope you and your students enjoy making stone soup and doing these fun activities just as much as we did! 

     

    Additional Resources from Scholastic Printables

    For more great activities, download a Stone Soup mini-book and worksheet for your students to write their very own soup recipes. 

    Don't forget to subscribe to my blog on Scholastic Top Teaching if you would like to get my latest posts delivered right to your inbox. 

    Thanks for reading, stay warm, and I’ll see you here next time!

    Hugs,

    Shari 

     

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Shari's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
5 Days of Gingerbread Fun!

The weeks before winter break can become long, so take a little extra time to plan some exciting activities to ensure you and your students are having fun learning this month. Read on for a fun and festive Gingerbread Man unit.

By Shari Carter
December 7, 2016
Blog Post
A Thankful Teacher and a Thanksgiving Recipe

I love spending time reflecting on the blessings in my life and hope you do too! Here's my list of things that make this teacher’s heart happy, plus a recipe for a Thanksgiving dish I can't live without!

By Shari Carter
November 22, 2016
Blog Post
5 Stories and Activities for Thanksgiving

If you are planning to read to young students during the days leading to Thanksgiving, these books are perfect! Each story is paired with activities to enhance your learners’ reading experience, and make your teaching just a little bit easier!

By Shari Carter
November 8, 2016
Blog Post
Hip, Hip, Hooray . . . It’s the 50th Day!

Although it seems like we just had our first day of school, here we are, soon-to-be celebrating 50 fabulous days of learning! And with a little preparation, you and your students will be twisting, shouting, and learning 1950s-style.

By Shari Carter
October 25, 2016
Blog Post
Spider Activities Your Class Will Love!

Young children are fascinated with creepy crawly creatures. Teaching a spider unit in the fall is a perfect way to take advantage of this interest. Engaging themes help kids make connections to the real world and get them super excited about learning.

By Shari Carter
October 10, 2016
Blog Post
World Smile Day: Celebrating Kindness at School!

World Smile Day is celebrated on the first Friday of October. When we have more kindness, we will definitely have more smiles! Read on for ideas of introducing and reinforcing compassion and kindness in our students.

By Shari Carter
September 27, 2016

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us