Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
November 8, 2016 5 Stories and Activities for Thanksgiving By Shari Carter
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5

    If you have young children you are planning to read to during the days that lead up to Thanksgiving, these books will be perfect for you! I have included some of my very favorite stories, and I absolutely love sharing them with my kiddos during this time of year. Each story is paired with activities to enhance your little learners’ reading experience, and make your teaching just a little bit easier!

     

    1. Pattern Block Turkeys

    These pattern block turkeys are not only super fun, but they also give children a chance to deepen their understanding of shapes and how they can be used to build pictures. My kids loved building their turkeys using the die-cut shapes my wonderful parent volunteer cut out for us.

    Just before we built our turkeys, I decided to make the task a little more challenging by teaching a quick mini-lesson on symmetry. As soon as the kids had a basic understanding of symmetry, they were off to add feathers to their turkeys — and boy were they excited! Having the kids color code their recording sheets made it easier for my students to count how many of each shape they used on their turkeys. Not one of my little guys even struggled with the task and I know the color coding step helped them out!

    This kid gets symmetry. My little guy did an amazing job and this project gave him an opportunity to show an extended understanding of a very important math concept. It’s important that kids are provided with open-ended opportunities like this, so that we can see just how much these young students know — and let me tell you, judging from this, they know A LOT!

     

    10 Fat Turkeys is full of silly words and turkeys doing silly things while it teaches kids to count. It is entertaining, has vivid illustrations, and my kids LOVE when I read this story to them!

     

    2. Thankful Writing

    November is a perfect time to focus on being thankful. We have lots of discussion about things we are thankful for. Focusing on wants and needs helps us to get a very good understanding of some of the most important things to be thankful for. I am always so excited to get a glimpse of my students’ hearts when they write about things and people who are very important in their lives. Their written words are so heartwarming!

     

    Bear Says Thanks is a great book for teaching thanks and learning all about Thanksgiving. The illustrations are beautiful and my kids love that there are so many rhyming words. Bear is the epitome of what a good friend is, and I love sharing this sweet story with my kids during the Thanksgiving holiday season. 

     

    3. Thanksgiving Turkey Baster Relay

    I love The Great Turkey Race, and so do my kids! It is a very funny Thanksgiving story that has three of the cutest little turkeys you could meet! The illustrations are beautiful, the competition is exciting, and there is a very interesting twist when they turkeys decide how to treat a cheating friend.

    I love my students’ hands — so small, and so cute! Fine motor skill activities are necessary in kindergarten. They help to build strength in those little hands. During the month of November, I can’t think of a better (and more fun) way to do just that. After reading about Cassie, Wing, and Ollie’s field day in The Great Turkey Race, we had turkey baster relays! It was a great way to have some fun and improve fine motor skills as my students used turkey basters to get their feathers to the end of the finish line. Fun!

     

    4. Roll-a-Turkey

    Dice games are a favorite in my class. Anytime we get the dice out, the excitement level in the room goes way up. Roll-A-Turkey is a fun game your students can play in a math center or with a friend. This dice game will help students with number sense and I promise you, your kids will love it!

    Stories with a math theme are the best. I get so excited when I can incorporate literacy into my math lessons. 10 Turkeys in the Road is a super fun counting book about one turkey who won’t get out of the road! 

     

    5. Directed Drawing

    We love directed drawing in kindergarten. We do it all the time. It is a quick and easy way to teach basic elements of art. When my students have more confidence in their ability to draw, they are less inhibited to draw pictures to go with their writing. We made cute little turkeys and used watercolors to paint them when we were done drawing. I recommend using watercolor paper instead of construction paper — it is thicker and holds up a lot better.

    We always begin our directed drawing lesson with pencils. I encourage them to sketch lightly, just in case they want to erase. When we are done drawing, we put away our pencils and take out our Sharpie markers — yes, even kindergarteners can be responsible enough to use this medium. They trace over all pencil markings and when they are done with that step, they get out their watercolors and start bringing their drawings to life. I love how their turkeys turned out and they did too!

    After finishing their artwork, my students had fun writing about their cute, colorful turkeys. 

    A Plump and Perky Turkey is a holiday favorite that I love reading to my class. The people of Squawk Valley want a turkey to eat for Thanksgiving, but the clever and tricky turkey foils the plan. The storyline is great and I loved that the turkey came away a winner!

    I am thankful for my family, students, and for each and every one of you! Thank you for following me on this adventure where I get to share what I love doing each and every day! Have a happy Thanksgiving, and I hope you and your "little turkeys" have a lot of fun celebrating the holiday!

    Happy Thanksgiving from my classroom to yours!

    Here are some other Thanksgiving ideas from my Top Teaching blog post: "Thanksgiving Fun in the Classroom."

    Don't forget to subscribe to my blog on Scholastic Top Teaching if you would like to get my latest posts delivered right to your inbox. 

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Shari :) 

     

     

    If you have young children you are planning to read to during the days that lead up to Thanksgiving, these books will be perfect for you! I have included some of my very favorite stories, and I absolutely love sharing them with my kiddos during this time of year. Each story is paired with activities to enhance your little learners’ reading experience, and make your teaching just a little bit easier!

     

    1. Pattern Block Turkeys

    These pattern block turkeys are not only super fun, but they also give children a chance to deepen their understanding of shapes and how they can be used to build pictures. My kids loved building their turkeys using the die-cut shapes my wonderful parent volunteer cut out for us.

    Just before we built our turkeys, I decided to make the task a little more challenging by teaching a quick mini-lesson on symmetry. As soon as the kids had a basic understanding of symmetry, they were off to add feathers to their turkeys — and boy were they excited! Having the kids color code their recording sheets made it easier for my students to count how many of each shape they used on their turkeys. Not one of my little guys even struggled with the task and I know the color coding step helped them out!

    This kid gets symmetry. My little guy did an amazing job and this project gave him an opportunity to show an extended understanding of a very important math concept. It’s important that kids are provided with open-ended opportunities like this, so that we can see just how much these young students know — and let me tell you, judging from this, they know A LOT!

     

    10 Fat Turkeys is full of silly words and turkeys doing silly things while it teaches kids to count. It is entertaining, has vivid illustrations, and my kids LOVE when I read this story to them!

     

    2. Thankful Writing

    November is a perfect time to focus on being thankful. We have lots of discussion about things we are thankful for. Focusing on wants and needs helps us to get a very good understanding of some of the most important things to be thankful for. I am always so excited to get a glimpse of my students’ hearts when they write about things and people who are very important in their lives. Their written words are so heartwarming!

     

    Bear Says Thanks is a great book for teaching thanks and learning all about Thanksgiving. The illustrations are beautiful and my kids love that there are so many rhyming words. Bear is the epitome of what a good friend is, and I love sharing this sweet story with my kids during the Thanksgiving holiday season. 

     

    3. Thanksgiving Turkey Baster Relay

    I love The Great Turkey Race, and so do my kids! It is a very funny Thanksgiving story that has three of the cutest little turkeys you could meet! The illustrations are beautiful, the competition is exciting, and there is a very interesting twist when they turkeys decide how to treat a cheating friend.

    I love my students’ hands — so small, and so cute! Fine motor skill activities are necessary in kindergarten. They help to build strength in those little hands. During the month of November, I can’t think of a better (and more fun) way to do just that. After reading about Cassie, Wing, and Ollie’s field day in The Great Turkey Race, we had turkey baster relays! It was a great way to have some fun and improve fine motor skills as my students used turkey basters to get their feathers to the end of the finish line. Fun!

     

    4. Roll-a-Turkey

    Dice games are a favorite in my class. Anytime we get the dice out, the excitement level in the room goes way up. Roll-A-Turkey is a fun game your students can play in a math center or with a friend. This dice game will help students with number sense and I promise you, your kids will love it!

    Stories with a math theme are the best. I get so excited when I can incorporate literacy into my math lessons. 10 Turkeys in the Road is a super fun counting book about one turkey who won’t get out of the road! 

     

    5. Directed Drawing

    We love directed drawing in kindergarten. We do it all the time. It is a quick and easy way to teach basic elements of art. When my students have more confidence in their ability to draw, they are less inhibited to draw pictures to go with their writing. We made cute little turkeys and used watercolors to paint them when we were done drawing. I recommend using watercolor paper instead of construction paper — it is thicker and holds up a lot better.

    We always begin our directed drawing lesson with pencils. I encourage them to sketch lightly, just in case they want to erase. When we are done drawing, we put away our pencils and take out our Sharpie markers — yes, even kindergarteners can be responsible enough to use this medium. They trace over all pencil markings and when they are done with that step, they get out their watercolors and start bringing their drawings to life. I love how their turkeys turned out and they did too!

    After finishing their artwork, my students had fun writing about their cute, colorful turkeys. 

    A Plump and Perky Turkey is a holiday favorite that I love reading to my class. The people of Squawk Valley want a turkey to eat for Thanksgiving, but the clever and tricky turkey foils the plan. The storyline is great and I loved that the turkey came away a winner!

    I am thankful for my family, students, and for each and every one of you! Thank you for following me on this adventure where I get to share what I love doing each and every day! Have a happy Thanksgiving, and I hope you and your "little turkeys" have a lot of fun celebrating the holiday!

    Happy Thanksgiving from my classroom to yours!

    Here are some other Thanksgiving ideas from my Top Teaching blog post: "Thanksgiving Fun in the Classroom."

    Don't forget to subscribe to my blog on Scholastic Top Teaching if you would like to get my latest posts delivered right to your inbox. 

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Shari :) 

     

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us