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April 24, 2018

Activities and Resources to Teach About Seeds and Plants 

By Shari Carter
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Reading My Big World is always a high point in our classroom. My children LOVE it! The magazine is loaded with fun-filled nonfiction, and is written for the youngest of learners. Seasonal and social-development topics line up perfectly with our curriculum. To get your own weekly subscription, just visit the My Big World web page. But to enjoy the activities and resources used in this blog post, for a limited time you can access the "I See Seeds" edition right here. 

    Read Together

    • Online Edition

    There are many ways to read My Big World, but we really enjoy the online edition. My kids can read it on tablets, or we can display and read the magazine on our interactive whiteboard. This is the way we usually begin exploring the magazine.

    • Paper Edition

    There’s nothing like putting a real magazine in a student’s hands! My children enjoy reading the magazine with a buddy, searching for sight words, and doing the exciting (and educational . . . shhhhh!) activities. When we are done with the magazine in class, I send it home so that my students can share what they have learned with their families.

    • BIG Issue

    The oversized version of each issue is perfect for shared reading. I can easily do a mini-lesson while reading the BIG issue. This week, we worked on phonological awareness and ending sounds using the headline and the words see and seeds. I invite my students to come up and read, or find words, in the big book. My students go back to these books time and time again. Teacher Tip: Laminate them so that they hold up to the many little hands that will be handling them.

    Art

    • Fork Print Dandelions

    Materials: Plastic forks, paint, paper plates, construction paper, cotton balls

    This was a great way to explore art media and work on fine motor skills, while deepening our understanding of seeds. Initially, I had planned on having them all do yellow dandelions, but that quickly changed . . . .

    We have a rainbow-themed classroom, and my children seem to enjoy things really BRIGHT so we ended up with rainbow dandelions and I would have to say that they really added some cheerful color to our classroom!

    We began making a small circle, using the tines of the fork. Then kids went around their original circle, making it bigger, until they were satisfied with their flower's appearance. When they were finished painting their flowers, they added stems and leaves. We waited a bit for the paint to dry, and then my kiddos dabbed on a little paint, using a contrasting color and a cotton ball, to the center of the flowers.

    Science

    • Mystery Garden

    Materials: Cups, soil, seeds/beans, craft sticks, small classroom items

    What fun this was! I filled cups with soil and made little signs using craft sticks. Next, I set out an array of small objects and told the children that we were going to plant the objects. We then made predictions of which items they thought would grow. We set the cups in a sunny place and have been watering them regularly. My kids have been checking the garden daily to see what is sprouting!

    Curious George Plants a Seed is a wonderful book to pair with the Mystery Garden activity.

    From Seed to Plant

    Materials: Construction paper, glue, labels, permanent markers, scissors, beans

    Reading the wonderful Gail Gibbons From Seed to Plant inspired us further! Learning needs to be engaging, and this flower-making project definitely captivated my students! Using the materials listed above, we worked on art, science, vocabulary, and even fine motor skills. When the kids finished their flowers, they added labels, and then we glued on seeds to add one last special touch! The kids really had fun making these!

    This culminating task brought all of our learning about seeds together in one super cute (and fun!) activity.

    Movement

    • Sprouting Kindergartners

    My Big World has action rhymes and sign language that keep wiggly kids learning! We had a blast pretending to be seeds growing into a sprout. We started all curled up, and then grew taller!

     

     

    More Seed Fun!

    I don’t have much of a green thumb, but I’ve heard that if you soak your seeds overnight, they will germinate faster. (Faster is always better in kindergarten.) There was a surprise bonus that came out of the soaking. The seed coat easily slipped off, which the kids thought was the coolest thing! It led us naturally to a conversation about how seed coats protect the seeds. I was able to easily cut the seed in half, and show the kids where the plant begins. In just one day of soaking, the seeds had already begun to germinate.

    We put lima beans in baggies, so that the kids could see the sprout emerge. I got this idea from another kindergarten teacher. She prefers starting her seeds this way because unlike burying the seeds in soil, your kids will get to experience the joy of watching the seed turn into a plant.

    We taped our seeds to the windows in our classroom to make sure they got lots and lot of sun!

    At our school, we have a wonderful little garden. Each class is responsible for planting and maintaining a garden bed. We took our sunflower seeds outside, and had so much fun planting them in the kindergarten garden bed. They walk past the garden every day as they leave the lunchroom, and I know they will get so much joy as they watch their seeds grow into beautiful sunflowers!

    I hope you can use some of these activities and that you always remember, when you love what you teach, your students will love what they learn!

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart for following my blog, and here’s to sunny days, filled with beautiful spring flowers!  

    xo-Shari

    Reading My Big World is always a high point in our classroom. My children LOVE it! The magazine is loaded with fun-filled nonfiction, and is written for the youngest of learners. Seasonal and social-development topics line up perfectly with our curriculum. To get your own weekly subscription, just visit the My Big World web page. But to enjoy the activities and resources used in this blog post, for a limited time you can access the "I See Seeds" edition right here. 

    Read Together

    • Online Edition

    There are many ways to read My Big World, but we really enjoy the online edition. My kids can read it on tablets, or we can display and read the magazine on our interactive whiteboard. This is the way we usually begin exploring the magazine.

    • Paper Edition

    There’s nothing like putting a real magazine in a student’s hands! My children enjoy reading the magazine with a buddy, searching for sight words, and doing the exciting (and educational . . . shhhhh!) activities. When we are done with the magazine in class, I send it home so that my students can share what they have learned with their families.

    • BIG Issue

    The oversized version of each issue is perfect for shared reading. I can easily do a mini-lesson while reading the BIG issue. This week, we worked on phonological awareness and ending sounds using the headline and the words see and seeds. I invite my students to come up and read, or find words, in the big book. My students go back to these books time and time again. Teacher Tip: Laminate them so that they hold up to the many little hands that will be handling them.

    Art

    • Fork Print Dandelions

    Materials: Plastic forks, paint, paper plates, construction paper, cotton balls

    This was a great way to explore art media and work on fine motor skills, while deepening our understanding of seeds. Initially, I had planned on having them all do yellow dandelions, but that quickly changed . . . .

    We have a rainbow-themed classroom, and my children seem to enjoy things really BRIGHT so we ended up with rainbow dandelions and I would have to say that they really added some cheerful color to our classroom!

    We began making a small circle, using the tines of the fork. Then kids went around their original circle, making it bigger, until they were satisfied with their flower's appearance. When they were finished painting their flowers, they added stems and leaves. We waited a bit for the paint to dry, and then my kiddos dabbed on a little paint, using a contrasting color and a cotton ball, to the center of the flowers.

    Science

    • Mystery Garden

    Materials: Cups, soil, seeds/beans, craft sticks, small classroom items

    What fun this was! I filled cups with soil and made little signs using craft sticks. Next, I set out an array of small objects and told the children that we were going to plant the objects. We then made predictions of which items they thought would grow. We set the cups in a sunny place and have been watering them regularly. My kids have been checking the garden daily to see what is sprouting!

    Curious George Plants a Seed is a wonderful book to pair with the Mystery Garden activity.

    From Seed to Plant

    Materials: Construction paper, glue, labels, permanent markers, scissors, beans

    Reading the wonderful Gail Gibbons From Seed to Plant inspired us further! Learning needs to be engaging, and this flower-making project definitely captivated my students! Using the materials listed above, we worked on art, science, vocabulary, and even fine motor skills. When the kids finished their flowers, they added labels, and then we glued on seeds to add one last special touch! The kids really had fun making these!

    This culminating task brought all of our learning about seeds together in one super cute (and fun!) activity.

    Movement

    • Sprouting Kindergartners

    My Big World has action rhymes and sign language that keep wiggly kids learning! We had a blast pretending to be seeds growing into a sprout. We started all curled up, and then grew taller!

     

     

    More Seed Fun!

    I don’t have much of a green thumb, but I’ve heard that if you soak your seeds overnight, they will germinate faster. (Faster is always better in kindergarten.) There was a surprise bonus that came out of the soaking. The seed coat easily slipped off, which the kids thought was the coolest thing! It led us naturally to a conversation about how seed coats protect the seeds. I was able to easily cut the seed in half, and show the kids where the plant begins. In just one day of soaking, the seeds had already begun to germinate.

    We put lima beans in baggies, so that the kids could see the sprout emerge. I got this idea from another kindergarten teacher. She prefers starting her seeds this way because unlike burying the seeds in soil, your kids will get to experience the joy of watching the seed turn into a plant.

    We taped our seeds to the windows in our classroom to make sure they got lots and lot of sun!

    At our school, we have a wonderful little garden. Each class is responsible for planting and maintaining a garden bed. We took our sunflower seeds outside, and had so much fun planting them in the kindergarten garden bed. They walk past the garden every day as they leave the lunchroom, and I know they will get so much joy as they watch their seeds grow into beautiful sunflowers!

    I hope you can use some of these activities and that you always remember, when you love what you teach, your students will love what they learn!

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart for following my blog, and here’s to sunny days, filled with beautiful spring flowers!  

    xo-Shari

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