Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
March 8, 2019

Must-Try Wind Activities for PreK

By Sandra Carrillo

Investigate the Power of Wind with These Hands-On Activities

Grades PreK–K

    Key Takeaways

    • Hands-on activities that focus on critical-thinking strategies help young children see themselves as problem solvers and creative thinkers.
    • Writing a class book helps promote expressive language experiences.
    • Using the environment as the “third teacher” helps young children learn the value of making careful observations of changes in the world around them.

    Kids as Weather Scientists

    Children are always intrigued by changes—especially changes in the weather.

    The windy days of March offer a great opportunity for preK kids to predict, observe and practice being weather scientists.

    A Cute Wind-Blown Dog and a Picture Walk

    That’s why I was thrilled to receive My Big World’s March issue all about wind power.

    The cute wind-blown dog on the cover delighted my students and me. Looking at the cover, I asked them, “What made the dog’s ear go up?”

    I took a piece of chart paper and wrote at the top of the page: Predictions

    Then I wrote the question What do you think?

    “The wind!” some answered.

    We did a picture walk of the issue to see if their predictions were correct.

    I then introduced the issue’s Big Word: breeze. We learned what it meant. Then it was time to act it out:

    Activity: Pretend You’re a Feather

    • I showed them a feather and placed it in the palm of my hand.
    • Then I blew on it very softly so that they could observe how the feather moved slowly from my hand to the ground.
    • We talked about it. I asked them, “How would it feel to be a feather? How would you move?”
    • “Pretend to be a feather!” I said. They began to spread out their arms and sway back and forth.
    • “Would you move fast or slowly?” I asked. “Slow!” they shouted.

    Then we watched the video that came with our issue, "The Power of Wind." After the video, I asked the children to think about what wind does.  

    Here is another activity they loved. It offered a hands-on way to explore the power of wind:

    STEM Activity: Wind-Power Races

    Materials:  Tissue paper (cut into squares), paper plates, masking tape (optional)

    This is how it worked:

    • I marked a starting point and an ending point on the floor with pieces of masking tape.
    • Then I divided the class into several teams. I gave each team a different colored piece of tissue paper and a paper plate. I showed them two different sizes of plates to give them options. Which plate would create more wind for the tissue paper to move?
    • They lined up behind the piece of tape.  I let them know that the goal is to move the tissue paper on the floor without touching it with their hands.
    • They must try to create wind to help them move the tissue paper to the finish line!

    They loved this activity. None of the children chose to use the smaller plate. They made the connection that the larger plate would probably create more wind. They were right!

    STEM Activity: Listen for the Wind!

    Materials: Pipe cleaners, yarn, sticks (craft sticks), beads, tape, jingle bells, washers, or old keys

    For this activity, I again introduced a new vocabulary term: wind chime.

    I also showed them a YouTube video of a wind chime blowing in the wind. I asked the children to close their eyes and listen to the sounds coming from the wind chime. What did they think was making the wind chime move?  What sounds do they hear?

    Then it was time to make our own wind chimes:

    • I chose to use the same materials recommended in My Big World’s Teacher’s Guide with some modifications. Instead of having the children thread the pipe cleaners through the beads, I cut five or six pieces of yarn and tied them to the craft stick.
    • I used two different colored pieces of yarn to create an AB pattern.. I also wrapped a small piece of tape around each end of the yarn in order to make it easier for the children to lace the beads, washers, etc.  
    • They had the option to use any of the materials on the table.  When they were finished, I helped them tie knots at the ends to make sure that everything stayed secure.
    • As each group finished, we went outside to see if we could hear the wind blowing through the chimes. We also hung them on the trees.

    The creativity they put into these masterpieces was amazing! I found this activity extra powerful because we were able to use the environment as the “third teacher.” Anytime children are given the opportunity to create personal connections with nature and the world, it’s priceless.

    Activity: Make a Class Book—What Does Wind Do?

    Materials: White drawing paper, crayons, markers, colored pencils

    • I gave each child a piece of white paper.
    • Each child used this piece of paper to create a page for our book about what the wind does.
    • As they finished, I asked them to dictate what they wrote/drew and then I scribed their words on the paper. Sentence starter: Wind _______________.  
    • When everyone was finished, I laminated the pages, created a cover for our book and pieced it together.   

    Now we’re ready to share the book and place it in the classroom library.

    I hope you find these tips helpful for teaching about wind power and changes in the weather. So much more came out of these activities than I anticipated. I was able to extend the lesson to allow the children to observe and make predictions on their own. Their problem-solving skills and creativity were truly enhanced.   

    If you’re looking for more hands-on activities that fit perfectly with your seasonal themes, give My Big World a try in your classroom. You can even take up to 30 days to see if it’s right for you. But I’m sure your class will love each delightful issue just as much as we do!   

    Happy teaching,

    Sandy

     

    — Sandra Carrillo is an early-childhood district coordinator in El Paso, Texas. She also teaches classes in early childhood education at the University of Texas at El Paso.

    Key Takeaways

    • Hands-on activities that focus on critical-thinking strategies help young children see themselves as problem solvers and creative thinkers.
    • Writing a class book helps promote expressive language experiences.
    • Using the environment as the “third teacher” helps young children learn the value of making careful observations of changes in the world around them.

    Kids as Weather Scientists

    Children are always intrigued by changes—especially changes in the weather.

    The windy days of March offer a great opportunity for preK kids to predict, observe and practice being weather scientists.

    A Cute Wind-Blown Dog and a Picture Walk

    That’s why I was thrilled to receive My Big World’s March issue all about wind power.

    The cute wind-blown dog on the cover delighted my students and me. Looking at the cover, I asked them, “What made the dog’s ear go up?”

    I took a piece of chart paper and wrote at the top of the page: Predictions

    Then I wrote the question What do you think?

    “The wind!” some answered.

    We did a picture walk of the issue to see if their predictions were correct.

    I then introduced the issue’s Big Word: breeze. We learned what it meant. Then it was time to act it out:

    Activity: Pretend You’re a Feather

    • I showed them a feather and placed it in the palm of my hand.
    • Then I blew on it very softly so that they could observe how the feather moved slowly from my hand to the ground.
    • We talked about it. I asked them, “How would it feel to be a feather? How would you move?”
    • “Pretend to be a feather!” I said. They began to spread out their arms and sway back and forth.
    • “Would you move fast or slowly?” I asked. “Slow!” they shouted.

    Then we watched the video that came with our issue, "The Power of Wind." After the video, I asked the children to think about what wind does.  

    Here is another activity they loved. It offered a hands-on way to explore the power of wind:

    STEM Activity: Wind-Power Races

    Materials:  Tissue paper (cut into squares), paper plates, masking tape (optional)

    This is how it worked:

    • I marked a starting point and an ending point on the floor with pieces of masking tape.
    • Then I divided the class into several teams. I gave each team a different colored piece of tissue paper and a paper plate. I showed them two different sizes of plates to give them options. Which plate would create more wind for the tissue paper to move?
    • They lined up behind the piece of tape.  I let them know that the goal is to move the tissue paper on the floor without touching it with their hands.
    • They must try to create wind to help them move the tissue paper to the finish line!

    They loved this activity. None of the children chose to use the smaller plate. They made the connection that the larger plate would probably create more wind. They were right!

    STEM Activity: Listen for the Wind!

    Materials: Pipe cleaners, yarn, sticks (craft sticks), beads, tape, jingle bells, washers, or old keys

    For this activity, I again introduced a new vocabulary term: wind chime.

    I also showed them a YouTube video of a wind chime blowing in the wind. I asked the children to close their eyes and listen to the sounds coming from the wind chime. What did they think was making the wind chime move?  What sounds do they hear?

    Then it was time to make our own wind chimes:

    • I chose to use the same materials recommended in My Big World’s Teacher’s Guide with some modifications. Instead of having the children thread the pipe cleaners through the beads, I cut five or six pieces of yarn and tied them to the craft stick.
    • I used two different colored pieces of yarn to create an AB pattern.. I also wrapped a small piece of tape around each end of the yarn in order to make it easier for the children to lace the beads, washers, etc.  
    • They had the option to use any of the materials on the table.  When they were finished, I helped them tie knots at the ends to make sure that everything stayed secure.
    • As each group finished, we went outside to see if we could hear the wind blowing through the chimes. We also hung them on the trees.

    The creativity they put into these masterpieces was amazing! I found this activity extra powerful because we were able to use the environment as the “third teacher.” Anytime children are given the opportunity to create personal connections with nature and the world, it’s priceless.

    Activity: Make a Class Book—What Does Wind Do?

    Materials: White drawing paper, crayons, markers, colored pencils

    • I gave each child a piece of white paper.
    • Each child used this piece of paper to create a page for our book about what the wind does.
    • As they finished, I asked them to dictate what they wrote/drew and then I scribed their words on the paper. Sentence starter: Wind _______________.  
    • When everyone was finished, I laminated the pages, created a cover for our book and pieced it together.   

    Now we’re ready to share the book and place it in the classroom library.

    I hope you find these tips helpful for teaching about wind power and changes in the weather. So much more came out of these activities than I anticipated. I was able to extend the lesson to allow the children to observe and make predictions on their own. Their problem-solving skills and creativity were truly enhanced.   

    If you’re looking for more hands-on activities that fit perfectly with your seasonal themes, give My Big World a try in your classroom. You can even take up to 30 days to see if it’s right for you. But I’m sure your class will love each delightful issue just as much as we do!   

    Happy teaching,

    Sandy

     

    — Sandra Carrillo is an early-childhood district coordinator in El Paso, Texas. She also teaches classes in early childhood education at the University of Texas at El Paso.

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us