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December 12, 2014

What's On Your Classroom Reading Wish List?

By Rhonda Stewart
Grades 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

    During the holiday season, it is not unusual for teachers to get requests from parents for recommendations for books for their children. Having the Scholastic Book Clubs catalog is a great visual resource that I use to recommend books. With each Scholastic Book Clubs catalog that comes in the mail, comes new books to have conversations about, to wish for. The Book Clubs catalogs are, to coin an expression, chock-full of books to get excited about.

    I posed a question to some my most avid readers, just to get an idea of not only what they are reading, but what could be included in the class library or even better, the school library. Here's the question: What book would you recommend to other kids and why?

    Here's what some of my students had to say:

    I would recommend Because of Winn Dixie, written by Kate DiCamillo. This is a great book for readers of all ages. To me, this book is a blend of reality and fiction. Opal is an amazing young lady who captures the heart of anyone who reads this book. And each chapter has its own magical moral. Read this book and you will not be disappointed! I highly recommend this book.

     

    I would recommend the book Wonder, written by R.J. Palacio. This book is very interesting. It takes you on the journey of a young man named August. August has a birth defect that affects his appearance. The really cool thing about this book is that you get to read about what August goes through from the points of view of his sister and his classmates. It made me think about the kids at my school and how they are treated and would like to be treated just like any normal kid! If you like books that are full of surprises, then I would recommend that you should read this book!

     

    I would recommend the book Wonder, written by R.J. Palacio. For me, it really shows how people with deformities or special needs have a life too. They shouldn’t be shut out. This book really shows how people should take a chance and get to know people who are different. They just might turn out to be a great person and a great friend!

     

    I would recommend the book, The Maze Runner, written by James Dashner for many reasons. It is full of suspense, full of action, and is interesting. The book shows that sticking together as a team is the best way to get through a problem. In the book, a character named Tomas, leads the way with strong emotions and feelings. He is a person who is loving, and cares about everyone. This book taught me to be grateful for what I have, not what I want and that’s why I would recommend this book.

     

    I would recommend the book, See You at Harry's, written by Johanna Knowles, for anyone who likes to read about family drama. Each member in Fern's family has their own issues and they are revealed through the pages of the book. Fern's voice is heard as the story is told. The family faces a crisis, and it shows how family can stay together when it looks like they have fallen apart. If you like going through an emotional journey with characters, then you will like this book.

     

    To round off the recommendations from some of my students, here are a few books from my desk:

    The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick — This is a story a young boy who lives inside of a clock tower. He has no real family to call his own. This book is full of detailed black and white illustrations. Students must infer meaning from the illustrations to hold onto what's happening in the story.

    Gaby, Lost and Found by Angela Cervantes — This is a great read about social issues. It touches on the subject of immigration and undocumented workers.

    Becoming Naomi Leon written by Pam Munoz Ryan — Young Naomi is in search of who she really is, as well as in search of her father. She comes to terms with the lack of connection to her mother and the strong connection that she has with her grandmother.

    Unspoken: A Story From The Underground Railroad written by Henry Cole — This is a wordless story illustrated from the voice of a young girl who witnesses the dilemma of a runaway slave.

    Mandela by Kadir Nelson — Nelson wrote and illustrated this biography of Nelson Mandela.

     

    Pearls of Wisdom In addition to the great finds at Scholastic Book Clubs, the Scholastic Teacher Store is currently having a great sale on books. All of the books mentioned can be found there. And because you are readers and friends, here is a Happy Holiday gift. Click on the coupon below and happy reading!

     

     

    What books are on your wish list? What books would you like to recommend? As always, I would love to hear from you and share ideas that make our lives easier!

    During the holiday season, it is not unusual for teachers to get requests from parents for recommendations for books for their children. Having the Scholastic Book Clubs catalog is a great visual resource that I use to recommend books. With each Scholastic Book Clubs catalog that comes in the mail, comes new books to have conversations about, to wish for. The Book Clubs catalogs are, to coin an expression, chock-full of books to get excited about.

    I posed a question to some my most avid readers, just to get an idea of not only what they are reading, but what could be included in the class library or even better, the school library. Here's the question: What book would you recommend to other kids and why?

    Here's what some of my students had to say:

    I would recommend Because of Winn Dixie, written by Kate DiCamillo. This is a great book for readers of all ages. To me, this book is a blend of reality and fiction. Opal is an amazing young lady who captures the heart of anyone who reads this book. And each chapter has its own magical moral. Read this book and you will not be disappointed! I highly recommend this book.

     

    I would recommend the book Wonder, written by R.J. Palacio. This book is very interesting. It takes you on the journey of a young man named August. August has a birth defect that affects his appearance. The really cool thing about this book is that you get to read about what August goes through from the points of view of his sister and his classmates. It made me think about the kids at my school and how they are treated and would like to be treated just like any normal kid! If you like books that are full of surprises, then I would recommend that you should read this book!

     

    I would recommend the book Wonder, written by R.J. Palacio. For me, it really shows how people with deformities or special needs have a life too. They shouldn’t be shut out. This book really shows how people should take a chance and get to know people who are different. They just might turn out to be a great person and a great friend!

     

    I would recommend the book, The Maze Runner, written by James Dashner for many reasons. It is full of suspense, full of action, and is interesting. The book shows that sticking together as a team is the best way to get through a problem. In the book, a character named Tomas, leads the way with strong emotions and feelings. He is a person who is loving, and cares about everyone. This book taught me to be grateful for what I have, not what I want and that’s why I would recommend this book.

     

    I would recommend the book, See You at Harry's, written by Johanna Knowles, for anyone who likes to read about family drama. Each member in Fern's family has their own issues and they are revealed through the pages of the book. Fern's voice is heard as the story is told. The family faces a crisis, and it shows how family can stay together when it looks like they have fallen apart. If you like going through an emotional journey with characters, then you will like this book.

     

    To round off the recommendations from some of my students, here are a few books from my desk:

    The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick — This is a story a young boy who lives inside of a clock tower. He has no real family to call his own. This book is full of detailed black and white illustrations. Students must infer meaning from the illustrations to hold onto what's happening in the story.

    Gaby, Lost and Found by Angela Cervantes — This is a great read about social issues. It touches on the subject of immigration and undocumented workers.

    Becoming Naomi Leon written by Pam Munoz Ryan — Young Naomi is in search of who she really is, as well as in search of her father. She comes to terms with the lack of connection to her mother and the strong connection that she has with her grandmother.

    Unspoken: A Story From The Underground Railroad written by Henry Cole — This is a wordless story illustrated from the voice of a young girl who witnesses the dilemma of a runaway slave.

    Mandela by Kadir Nelson — Nelson wrote and illustrated this biography of Nelson Mandela.

     

    Pearls of Wisdom In addition to the great finds at Scholastic Book Clubs, the Scholastic Teacher Store is currently having a great sale on books. All of the books mentioned can be found there. And because you are readers and friends, here is a Happy Holiday gift. Click on the coupon below and happy reading!

     

     

    What books are on your wish list? What books would you like to recommend? As always, I would love to hear from you and share ideas that make our lives easier!

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