Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
January 29, 2016 Twitter Book Recommendation Wall By Rhonda Stewart
Grades 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

    As far as technology is concerned, I have these moments when I truly feel that I have stepped into the 21st century and my dinosaur persona is in retreat. I am trying out new apps in my classroom and my personal life. My iPad needs constant recharging from constant use as my camera, personal library, appointment calendar, and entertainment — just for starters.

    And then there are those moments when I realize that I still have a lot to learn, especially in the area of social media. To be more exact: Twitter. On the occasions that I tweet, I use fellow Top Teaching blogger Meghan Everett’s Twitter guidebook. It has been extremely helpful. So much so that I'm almost ready to flex my tweeting muscles with her "Twitter for Teachers 201: Chatting and Best Practices." (Use #TopTeaching on the Scholastic Teachers Twitter page to find out about Top Teaching Twitter chats!)

    My students are extremely tech-savvy as I am sure your students are, and certainly so are those of my colleague's, Jessica Bolognese. It was in her classroom that I had a lightbulb moment after seeing a Twitter display on her wall. I was curious and inquired how the display was being used. In a nutshell, her students create literacy goals with tweets.

    Building on that, my thought was, why not create a Twitter wall in the classroom as a way to communicate about books that have been read and recommended by my students. I presented the idea to my classes and they were up for the challenge. They appreciated that this was not another "project" — it was not going to be graded and they could tweet at their convenience. Basically, no pressure!

     

    J. Bolognese's Twitter Wall

     
    Book Tweeting in Room 504

    Before presenting this to the class, my student teacher, Jackie Corsini and I viewed/researched several sample tweet templates and decided on one that was simple and easy to use. This needed to be an independent activity where students could post their recommendations at their leisure with very little guidance from me. Each student received a blank template with directions and a sample entry to get them started. Additional blank templates are housed in a basket in the classroom library. It was a no-brainer to place the basket in the library; it is a gentle reminder to fill it out and recommend a book. It’s interesting to see students reading the recommendations and making book selections based upon the recommendation.

     

    "Book Tweet" Directions

     

    Sample "Book Tweet"

     

    "Book Tweet" Wall

     

    As I visited other literacy classrooms in my school, I noticed a pattern with book recommendation walls. Teachers either used their classroom themes or the school musical as a backdrop for their walls. Michelle Murray uses a garden theme in her classroom and continued the theme with her book wall. Another teacher, Terri Seggio, used the school musical, Lion King, JR. as her backdrop.

     

    M. Murray's Wall

     

    T. Seggio's Wall

     

    Conversation about books is what I am striving for in my classroom and if the Twitter Wall connects with some of my students, I have made steps to achieving my biggest goal: nurturing my students towards becoming powerful lifelong readers!

    Pearls of Wisdom Do you need some ideas for Black History Month? Check out these Scholastic Resources:

    Do you have any student book recommendation strategies? Please share! I enjoy trading ideas that make all of our lives easier!

    As far as technology is concerned, I have these moments when I truly feel that I have stepped into the 21st century and my dinosaur persona is in retreat. I am trying out new apps in my classroom and my personal life. My iPad needs constant recharging from constant use as my camera, personal library, appointment calendar, and entertainment — just for starters.

    And then there are those moments when I realize that I still have a lot to learn, especially in the area of social media. To be more exact: Twitter. On the occasions that I tweet, I use fellow Top Teaching blogger Meghan Everett’s Twitter guidebook. It has been extremely helpful. So much so that I'm almost ready to flex my tweeting muscles with her "Twitter for Teachers 201: Chatting and Best Practices." (Use #TopTeaching on the Scholastic Teachers Twitter page to find out about Top Teaching Twitter chats!)

    My students are extremely tech-savvy as I am sure your students are, and certainly so are those of my colleague's, Jessica Bolognese. It was in her classroom that I had a lightbulb moment after seeing a Twitter display on her wall. I was curious and inquired how the display was being used. In a nutshell, her students create literacy goals with tweets.

    Building on that, my thought was, why not create a Twitter wall in the classroom as a way to communicate about books that have been read and recommended by my students. I presented the idea to my classes and they were up for the challenge. They appreciated that this was not another "project" — it was not going to be graded and they could tweet at their convenience. Basically, no pressure!

     

    J. Bolognese's Twitter Wall

     
    Book Tweeting in Room 504

    Before presenting this to the class, my student teacher, Jackie Corsini and I viewed/researched several sample tweet templates and decided on one that was simple and easy to use. This needed to be an independent activity where students could post their recommendations at their leisure with very little guidance from me. Each student received a blank template with directions and a sample entry to get them started. Additional blank templates are housed in a basket in the classroom library. It was a no-brainer to place the basket in the library; it is a gentle reminder to fill it out and recommend a book. It’s interesting to see students reading the recommendations and making book selections based upon the recommendation.

     

    "Book Tweet" Directions

     

    Sample "Book Tweet"

     

    "Book Tweet" Wall

     

    As I visited other literacy classrooms in my school, I noticed a pattern with book recommendation walls. Teachers either used their classroom themes or the school musical as a backdrop for their walls. Michelle Murray uses a garden theme in her classroom and continued the theme with her book wall. Another teacher, Terri Seggio, used the school musical, Lion King, JR. as her backdrop.

     

    M. Murray's Wall

     

    T. Seggio's Wall

     

    Conversation about books is what I am striving for in my classroom and if the Twitter Wall connects with some of my students, I have made steps to achieving my biggest goal: nurturing my students towards becoming powerful lifelong readers!

    Pearls of Wisdom Do you need some ideas for Black History Month? Check out these Scholastic Resources:

    Do you have any student book recommendation strategies? Please share! I enjoy trading ideas that make all of our lives easier!

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us