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December 18, 2015

Ring in the New Year by Revisiting Literacy Goals

By Rhonda Stewart
Grades 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

    As my students prepare for winter break, they take some time to reflect on the work that they have been doing in literacy this year. They think about their "aha" moments, their successes, and their moments of pause that cause them some angst. They research and review their reader’s and writer’s notebooks, reading logs, their published writing, and make decisions on what they want to improve upon. They listen to input from their reading and writing partners as well, to make informed choices about setting goals for themselves.

    REVISITING READING GOALS

    Our goal-setting exercise begins at the beginning of this school year when my students draft objectives that they will strive towards achieving. In the past, I had students reflect on their objectives in September, January, and later in June. This year, I decided to have them revisit their goals more often — essentially at times that correspond to our marking periods. Students set goals for the first marking period and then check midway in that marking period to see how they are doing and consider whether they need to readjust their aims.

     

    GOALS FOR MARKING PERIODS ONE AND TWO

     

    GOAL REFLECTION ANCHOR CHART

    We are now in our second marking period and my students are in the process of checking in to see how they are moving towards their goals. Normally, I have them write their goals on index cards for a place on our "goal wall" or have them enter the goals in their notebooks. This year I made an executive decision that creativity was in order. Although our classroom reflects student work, there are slim representations of the holiday season. With that in mind, we have added holiday flavor to our room and constructed a Goal Setting Star Tree. It's simple, it's easy, and it's colorful. The best part of this activity is that it's not time consuming! When the new year rolls in our tree will be transformed into our school image: a large shining star.

     

    2016 LITERACY GOALS

    In keeping with our Dr. Seuss theme, the Grinch decided to pay our goal wall a visit.

     

    Looking for different ways to display student goals in your classroom? Think about using:

    • Word Art: Use Wordle, an online website that creates word cloud collages with words that your students select.

    • Bookmarks: Students create their goals in the form of a bookmark. Their goals are “living” with them in the classroom.

      

    • High Five: This idea was given to me by one of my colleagues. Students trace their hands and write goals on the handprint to be displayed. I am looking forward to using this idea right before we take the PARCC as a confidence boost for my students.

    • Holiday Theme: Shape the goals into an image that represents a holiday event. For example, a heart-shaped goal for Valentine’s Day or a shamrock-shaped goal for St. Patrick’s Day. The possibilities are endless.

    Pearls of WisdomEnjoy your winter break!

    Have a happy, safe and healthy holiday season. See you next year!

     

    As my students prepare for winter break, they take some time to reflect on the work that they have been doing in literacy this year. They think about their "aha" moments, their successes, and their moments of pause that cause them some angst. They research and review their reader’s and writer’s notebooks, reading logs, their published writing, and make decisions on what they want to improve upon. They listen to input from their reading and writing partners as well, to make informed choices about setting goals for themselves.

    REVISITING READING GOALS

    Our goal-setting exercise begins at the beginning of this school year when my students draft objectives that they will strive towards achieving. In the past, I had students reflect on their objectives in September, January, and later in June. This year, I decided to have them revisit their goals more often — essentially at times that correspond to our marking periods. Students set goals for the first marking period and then check midway in that marking period to see how they are doing and consider whether they need to readjust their aims.

     

    GOALS FOR MARKING PERIODS ONE AND TWO

     

    GOAL REFLECTION ANCHOR CHART

    We are now in our second marking period and my students are in the process of checking in to see how they are moving towards their goals. Normally, I have them write their goals on index cards for a place on our "goal wall" or have them enter the goals in their notebooks. This year I made an executive decision that creativity was in order. Although our classroom reflects student work, there are slim representations of the holiday season. With that in mind, we have added holiday flavor to our room and constructed a Goal Setting Star Tree. It's simple, it's easy, and it's colorful. The best part of this activity is that it's not time consuming! When the new year rolls in our tree will be transformed into our school image: a large shining star.

     

    2016 LITERACY GOALS

    In keeping with our Dr. Seuss theme, the Grinch decided to pay our goal wall a visit.

     

    Looking for different ways to display student goals in your classroom? Think about using:

    • Word Art: Use Wordle, an online website that creates word cloud collages with words that your students select.

    • Bookmarks: Students create their goals in the form of a bookmark. Their goals are “living” with them in the classroom.

      

    • High Five: This idea was given to me by one of my colleagues. Students trace their hands and write goals on the handprint to be displayed. I am looking forward to using this idea right before we take the PARCC as a confidence boost for my students.

    • Holiday Theme: Shape the goals into an image that represents a holiday event. For example, a heart-shaped goal for Valentine’s Day or a shamrock-shaped goal for St. Patrick’s Day. The possibilities are endless.

    Pearls of WisdomEnjoy your winter break!

    Have a happy, safe and healthy holiday season. See you next year!

     

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