Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
April 24, 2015 Anchor Charts Revisited By Rhonda Stewart
Grades 3–5, 6–8

    This post is very near and dear to me because it speaks to the relationship that I have with my colleagues and their willingness to share their classrooms with me.

    Before I became a sixth-grade literacy teacher, I was a literacy coach. It was a great experience, giving me the opportunity to work with some really wonderful and dedicated teachers I might otherwise not have. My job was to guide them through the process of learning, becoming comfortable with, and implementing the new materials. One of the greatest outcomes was the work relationships that were cultivated. I would call it a “mutual admiration society.”

    Fast-forward to present time, and I am back in the classroom. Leaving the position of literacy coach was difficult, but I had to admit, I really missed working with kids. As much as I enjoyed working with my colleagues, I just missed teaching! Now I get to collaborate with my colleagues on a different level. The downside to being back in the classroom in my building is that I get so involved in the “teaching” that I can miss seeing some of my colleagues for days. Our building is that big! When I decided that I was going to write a post about anchor charts, I made the decision that I would check in with some of my colleagues and share their work with you. A huge thanks to them for allowing me to be an "honest thief" by borrowing their anchor charts.

    Some of the charts that I display here are from fifth grade, but most are from sixth. Some of the charts focus on the current reading unit of study, while others highlight writing and test-taking strategies.

     

    Reading Anchor Charts

    Courtesy of C. Campanale, Grade 5

     

    Courtesy of C. Holzer, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of J. Carter, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of M. Murray, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of T. Andrews, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of T. Andrews, Grade 6

     

    Writing Anchor Charts

    Courtesy of C. Massa, Grade 5

     

    Courtesy of C. Holzer, Grade 6

     
     

    Courtesy of Room 504

     


    Test-Taking Anchor Chart

    Courtesy of Room 504

    This chart is colored-coded. Students identify the strategies they use to answer test questions. Yellow represents a gift that is given in the text. Purple represents choosing the best answer by using the process of elimination. Green represents rereading the text to locate the answer. Bold words are highlighted in pink: these are words that need "special attention."

     

     Pearls of Wisdom — We are approaching the end of the school year. Take a look at your anchor charts. It's okay to recycle and reuse. Just be sure to laminate for extended use.

    Any anchor charts tips that work for you? As always, please share. I love ideas that make all of our lives easier!

    For additional information regarding anchor tips, please check out my first post about anchor charts, "Anchor Charts as an Effective Teaching/Student Tool," and fellow blogger Alycia Zimmerman's post, "Anchor Charts for a New Year!"

    This post is very near and dear to me because it speaks to the relationship that I have with my colleagues and their willingness to share their classrooms with me.

    Before I became a sixth-grade literacy teacher, I was a literacy coach. It was a great experience, giving me the opportunity to work with some really wonderful and dedicated teachers I might otherwise not have. My job was to guide them through the process of learning, becoming comfortable with, and implementing the new materials. One of the greatest outcomes was the work relationships that were cultivated. I would call it a “mutual admiration society.”

    Fast-forward to present time, and I am back in the classroom. Leaving the position of literacy coach was difficult, but I had to admit, I really missed working with kids. As much as I enjoyed working with my colleagues, I just missed teaching! Now I get to collaborate with my colleagues on a different level. The downside to being back in the classroom in my building is that I get so involved in the “teaching” that I can miss seeing some of my colleagues for days. Our building is that big! When I decided that I was going to write a post about anchor charts, I made the decision that I would check in with some of my colleagues and share their work with you. A huge thanks to them for allowing me to be an "honest thief" by borrowing their anchor charts.

    Some of the charts that I display here are from fifth grade, but most are from sixth. Some of the charts focus on the current reading unit of study, while others highlight writing and test-taking strategies.

     

    Reading Anchor Charts

    Courtesy of C. Campanale, Grade 5

     

    Courtesy of C. Holzer, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of J. Carter, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of M. Murray, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of T. Andrews, Grade 6

     

    Courtesy of T. Andrews, Grade 6

     

    Writing Anchor Charts

    Courtesy of C. Massa, Grade 5

     

    Courtesy of C. Holzer, Grade 6

     
     

    Courtesy of Room 504

     


    Test-Taking Anchor Chart

    Courtesy of Room 504

    This chart is colored-coded. Students identify the strategies they use to answer test questions. Yellow represents a gift that is given in the text. Purple represents choosing the best answer by using the process of elimination. Green represents rereading the text to locate the answer. Bold words are highlighted in pink: these are words that need "special attention."

     

     Pearls of Wisdom — We are approaching the end of the school year. Take a look at your anchor charts. It's okay to recycle and reuse. Just be sure to laminate for extended use.

    Any anchor charts tips that work for you? As always, please share. I love ideas that make all of our lives easier!

    For additional information regarding anchor tips, please check out my first post about anchor charts, "Anchor Charts as an Effective Teaching/Student Tool," and fellow blogger Alycia Zimmerman's post, "Anchor Charts for a New Year!"

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us