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October 27, 2017

Classroom Management Tips for New Teachers

By Rhonda Stewart
Grades 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

    I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work alongside and learn from new teachers. I look forward to sharing ideas and some of my wisdom and experience to help new teachers flourish. This year has been an anomaly. Usually, I would be working one-on-one as a mentor to a new teacher in our middle school English department. Instead, I am surrounded by new teachers. Four to be exact. Fortunately, we are assigned to the same team, but it is putting my role as a mentor teacher to the test. Working with so many new teachers, I had to learn to pace myself. I soon came to the realization that I needed to create a plan of success so that all of us — myself included — would not crash and burn with the demands of the new school year.

    Classroom management is always an area of concern for new teachers. Thankfully, I could assist my newbies with a few of my past blog posts: "Classroom Management in a Nutshell," "New Teachers: Geting Started," and "Teacher Mentoring From a New Teacher’s Point of View."

    I also decided to reach out to some of my colleagues for additional support and a fresh pair of eyes for a new perspective. Teaching has more than one scenario; some teachers move room to room on a cart, while others work with small groups of students from different classrooms. At first, they were surprised that I would come to them for input and advice. I really had to laugh and remind them that as teachers we make each other look good! It’s knowing that we’ve got each other’s back, no matter what. Thanks to Diane Anderson, Kathy Gorka, Tamara Hollinger, Cara Holzer, and Hyatania Jones for their words of wisdom. Thanks for having my back!

    Collective Classroom Management Tips

    Diane Anderson: Grade Six Academic Intervention Services Teacher

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    As a teacher on a cart, I enter multiple classrooms per day. Like a snowflake, no two classrooms are alike: the students, the desk arrangement, the anchor charts, the view — all different. In comparison to other teachers, my time in the room is brief and therefore classroom management is imperative.

    My tip/strategy was echoed in by our district’s keynote speaker, Dan St. Romain, when he said: BUILD RELATIONSHIPS . . . NOT CONSEQUENCES. When you have a good rapport with the students in the classroom, management falls in place naturally.

     

    Hyatania Jones : Grade Five Math/Science Teacher 

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    First, convey the message that you have high expectations for all of your students beginning on THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL and continue to remind them of this daily through your words and interactions with them.  

    Also, it's so important to establish a relationship that encourages respect for everyone and to build a sense of community with your students. I do this by having a Morning Meeting at the beginning of each week to share a Motivational Quote of the Week,* discuss how we spent our weekend, talk about upcoming class expectations and/or school events for the week, and any questions or concerns that my students may have.

     

     

    Tamara Hollinger: Grade One Teacher

    Pine Grove Manor School, Somerset, New Jersey

    Get to know your students. Make your classroom relatable to current trends if possible. Groups can have sports names, or movie or book character names, for example. Introduce a current song set and align it to a content area, always remembering to demonstrate the expectation. For instance, when the students hear the introduction or three minutes of the song, they know it’s time to begin writing or reading, etc. When they hear a different song playing, that is their cue to stop and share.  

    Earn as you learn! Students are given a coin (one cent) for school attendance; I relate it to their parents going to work to earn a paycheck. They can also earn one cent if they demonstrate leadership skills in class during work time, or show acts of kindness towards a friend. At the end of the week, students shop at our classroom "toy store."

       

     

    Cara Holzer: Grade Six Learning and/or Language Disabilities Teacher

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    I use different desk configurations to meet the various needs of my students. I always have an extra desk for a student to work at or go for quiet time. I also have objects to soothe the students so they can pull themselves together. 

    I also have a rocker in my room that I use to allow students to sit as a reward, or for just chilling out. Sometimes I play relaxing music or have the lights out.

    Kathy Gorka: Grade Six, Academic Intervention Services Teacher (Read 180)

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    I have an established routine that begins the moment students enter the classroom. When the students arrive in the morning, they see a morning message I prepare for them giving instructions for a task to be completed in a given amount of time. I use a timer to help them keep on task.

    I also use a self-monitoring behavior board. When a student is doing something amazing that I feel deserves recognition or if they are off task and need a reminder, the corresponding colored arrow is moved to the student's card.

    My final bit of advice is to keep materials labeled and stored neatly in a specific place making them easy to access. This eliminates wasted time looking for things, as well as distracting discussions about where something might be.

    My tip: Keep it simple. Have a few manageable routines that you can build upon. Set the students up for success so that you can reward the positive behavior and extinguish the negative behavior.

    *I personally use quotes from the selection offered at Teaching Resources. There is a great variety!

     

                 

    Pearls of Wisdom — This is an oldie, but goodie. It’s the beginning of cold and flu season. Take care of yourself!

    If you are a new teacher and visiting my blog posts for the first time, welcome! If you are a seasoned teacher and have new teachers in your building, be sure to reach out them to let them know that they have support in your building.

     

    Do you have any successful classroom management tips that work? Please share! I enjoy sharing ideas that make all of our lives easier.

     

    I am fortunate to have the opportunity to work alongside and learn from new teachers. I look forward to sharing ideas and some of my wisdom and experience to help new teachers flourish. This year has been an anomaly. Usually, I would be working one-on-one as a mentor to a new teacher in our middle school English department. Instead, I am surrounded by new teachers. Four to be exact. Fortunately, we are assigned to the same team, but it is putting my role as a mentor teacher to the test. Working with so many new teachers, I had to learn to pace myself. I soon came to the realization that I needed to create a plan of success so that all of us — myself included — would not crash and burn with the demands of the new school year.

    Classroom management is always an area of concern for new teachers. Thankfully, I could assist my newbies with a few of my past blog posts: "Classroom Management in a Nutshell," "New Teachers: Geting Started," and "Teacher Mentoring From a New Teacher’s Point of View."

    I also decided to reach out to some of my colleagues for additional support and a fresh pair of eyes for a new perspective. Teaching has more than one scenario; some teachers move room to room on a cart, while others work with small groups of students from different classrooms. At first, they were surprised that I would come to them for input and advice. I really had to laugh and remind them that as teachers we make each other look good! It’s knowing that we’ve got each other’s back, no matter what. Thanks to Diane Anderson, Kathy Gorka, Tamara Hollinger, Cara Holzer, and Hyatania Jones for their words of wisdom. Thanks for having my back!

    Collective Classroom Management Tips

    Diane Anderson: Grade Six Academic Intervention Services Teacher

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    As a teacher on a cart, I enter multiple classrooms per day. Like a snowflake, no two classrooms are alike: the students, the desk arrangement, the anchor charts, the view — all different. In comparison to other teachers, my time in the room is brief and therefore classroom management is imperative.

    My tip/strategy was echoed in by our district’s keynote speaker, Dan St. Romain, when he said: BUILD RELATIONSHIPS . . . NOT CONSEQUENCES. When you have a good rapport with the students in the classroom, management falls in place naturally.

     

    Hyatania Jones : Grade Five Math/Science Teacher 

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    First, convey the message that you have high expectations for all of your students beginning on THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL and continue to remind them of this daily through your words and interactions with them.  

    Also, it's so important to establish a relationship that encourages respect for everyone and to build a sense of community with your students. I do this by having a Morning Meeting at the beginning of each week to share a Motivational Quote of the Week,* discuss how we spent our weekend, talk about upcoming class expectations and/or school events for the week, and any questions or concerns that my students may have.

     

     

    Tamara Hollinger: Grade One Teacher

    Pine Grove Manor School, Somerset, New Jersey

    Get to know your students. Make your classroom relatable to current trends if possible. Groups can have sports names, or movie or book character names, for example. Introduce a current song set and align it to a content area, always remembering to demonstrate the expectation. For instance, when the students hear the introduction or three minutes of the song, they know it’s time to begin writing or reading, etc. When they hear a different song playing, that is their cue to stop and share.  

    Earn as you learn! Students are given a coin (one cent) for school attendance; I relate it to their parents going to work to earn a paycheck. They can also earn one cent if they demonstrate leadership skills in class during work time, or show acts of kindness towards a friend. At the end of the week, students shop at our classroom "toy store."

       

     

    Cara Holzer: Grade Six Learning and/or Language Disabilities Teacher

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    I use different desk configurations to meet the various needs of my students. I always have an extra desk for a student to work at or go for quiet time. I also have objects to soothe the students so they can pull themselves together. 

    I also have a rocker in my room that I use to allow students to sit as a reward, or for just chilling out. Sometimes I play relaxing music or have the lights out.

    Kathy Gorka: Grade Six, Academic Intervention Services Teacher (Read 180)

    Sampson G. Smith School, Somerset, New Jersey

    I have an established routine that begins the moment students enter the classroom. When the students arrive in the morning, they see a morning message I prepare for them giving instructions for a task to be completed in a given amount of time. I use a timer to help them keep on task.

    I also use a self-monitoring behavior board. When a student is doing something amazing that I feel deserves recognition or if they are off task and need a reminder, the corresponding colored arrow is moved to the student's card.

    My final bit of advice is to keep materials labeled and stored neatly in a specific place making them easy to access. This eliminates wasted time looking for things, as well as distracting discussions about where something might be.

    My tip: Keep it simple. Have a few manageable routines that you can build upon. Set the students up for success so that you can reward the positive behavior and extinguish the negative behavior.

    *I personally use quotes from the selection offered at Teaching Resources. There is a great variety!

     

                 

    Pearls of Wisdom — This is an oldie, but goodie. It’s the beginning of cold and flu season. Take care of yourself!

    If you are a new teacher and visiting my blog posts for the first time, welcome! If you are a seasoned teacher and have new teachers in your building, be sure to reach out them to let them know that they have support in your building.

     

    Do you have any successful classroom management tips that work? Please share! I enjoy sharing ideas that make all of our lives easier.

     

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