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November 22, 2017

Wonderful Winter Art Projects

By Nancy Jang
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    During the holidays, many areas of the United States are buried in snow, snow, and more snow. While I can see snowcapped mountains in the distance, here in Southern California, it’s still sunny and 60 degrees, with a chance that you might have to put on a jacket. That's winter in these parts. To help us get into the spirit of a real winter, and bring a little chill into our classroom, I do these easy projects with my kiddos. No matter where you live, or what your climate, these are great for the fronts of holiday cards, or just to decorate your classroom.

    Snowy Tree

    Materials:

    Black Sharpie

    Crayons

    Washable markers

    Paint brush and water

    Begin with a black Sharpie or a black crayon. Create the trunk of a tree by drawing a line from the top to the bottom. Then, in graduated lengths, draw branches that jut perpendicularly to the truck. The lines do not have to be perfectly straight.

    Next, use various shades of green to draw the needles using the letter V. If you have younger children, you can use lighter green crayon first before adding green marker. From each of the branches, draw the letter V so that the point of the V is connected to the center of the branch. Smaller Vs at the top of the tree and progressively larger Vs as you get closer to the bottom of the trunk. Repeat in varying sizes to create a forest. Draw snowflakes in the sky using white or gray crayon. Then use a wet paint brush and lightly trace the branches and needles to blend the lines of the green marker. Trace the white crayon snowflakes with blue marker, and gently brush with a wet paint brush to make the snowflakes appear.

    Pattern Block Snowflakes

    Materials:

    Blue and white pieces of construction paper

    Glue

    Have a parent die-cut all the pattern block shapes using white paper. If you have young students, it’s helpful to pre-draw the lines of symmetry on blue paper in pencil. Explain to the students that all snowflakes have the same pattern on each arm of the snowflake. Demonstrate by gluing various shapes in a repeating pattern on each arm of the snowflake so that all the arms have the same repeating pattern.

    Giant Snowflake

    Materials:

    Crayons

    Watercolors

    Light gray or manila construction paper

    Using light gray or light manila construction paper, direct the students to draw a large snowflake in white crayon. With my little first grade kiddos, I tell them to draw an addition sign with an X over that. Then, we draw patterns and designs on each arm of the snowflake such as curls, hearts, Xs, circles and lines, repeating the same design on each arm. After drawing the designs, we use the cool colors purple and blue to watercolor directly over the snowflake and the rest of the page. The white crayon will resist the watercolors and the result is simple but beautiful!

    All of these art projects are easy, fun, and they make great holiday card fronts! I hope that you will enjoy them with your class.

    Happy Winter and Happy Teaching,

    Nancy

     

    During the holidays, many areas of the United States are buried in snow, snow, and more snow. While I can see snowcapped mountains in the distance, here in Southern California, it’s still sunny and 60 degrees, with a chance that you might have to put on a jacket. That's winter in these parts. To help us get into the spirit of a real winter, and bring a little chill into our classroom, I do these easy projects with my kiddos. No matter where you live, or what your climate, these are great for the fronts of holiday cards, or just to decorate your classroom.

    Snowy Tree

    Materials:

    Black Sharpie

    Crayons

    Washable markers

    Paint brush and water

    Begin with a black Sharpie or a black crayon. Create the trunk of a tree by drawing a line from the top to the bottom. Then, in graduated lengths, draw branches that jut perpendicularly to the truck. The lines do not have to be perfectly straight.

    Next, use various shades of green to draw the needles using the letter V. If you have younger children, you can use lighter green crayon first before adding green marker. From each of the branches, draw the letter V so that the point of the V is connected to the center of the branch. Smaller Vs at the top of the tree and progressively larger Vs as you get closer to the bottom of the trunk. Repeat in varying sizes to create a forest. Draw snowflakes in the sky using white or gray crayon. Then use a wet paint brush and lightly trace the branches and needles to blend the lines of the green marker. Trace the white crayon snowflakes with blue marker, and gently brush with a wet paint brush to make the snowflakes appear.

    Pattern Block Snowflakes

    Materials:

    Blue and white pieces of construction paper

    Glue

    Have a parent die-cut all the pattern block shapes using white paper. If you have young students, it’s helpful to pre-draw the lines of symmetry on blue paper in pencil. Explain to the students that all snowflakes have the same pattern on each arm of the snowflake. Demonstrate by gluing various shapes in a repeating pattern on each arm of the snowflake so that all the arms have the same repeating pattern.

    Giant Snowflake

    Materials:

    Crayons

    Watercolors

    Light gray or manila construction paper

    Using light gray or light manila construction paper, direct the students to draw a large snowflake in white crayon. With my little first grade kiddos, I tell them to draw an addition sign with an X over that. Then, we draw patterns and designs on each arm of the snowflake such as curls, hearts, Xs, circles and lines, repeating the same design on each arm. After drawing the designs, we use the cool colors purple and blue to watercolor directly over the snowflake and the rest of the page. The white crayon will resist the watercolors and the result is simple but beautiful!

    All of these art projects are easy, fun, and they make great holiday card fronts! I hope that you will enjoy them with your class.

    Happy Winter and Happy Teaching,

    Nancy

     

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