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May 26, 2016 Get Hired: Resumes and Interviews in Education By Meghan Everette
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

     

    My family and I are making a big move this summer — all the way across the country! I’ve been busily preparing my resumes, sending transcripts, and scouring school district web pages for job postings. Luckily, I’ve learned a couple of things about resumes and interviews both from my own experiences and while reviewing applications for various education organizations. Whether you just want to transfer across town or are gearing up for a bigger change, here are a few tips for finding your next career move.

     

     

    Resumes

    • Prepare
      The tendency is to get a resume ready only when you truly need it, so there is added pressure for it to be perfect so that you can land the interview. Go ahead and update your information every time you present or have a notable change to alleviate stress when you really need the resume. You can always cut extras out later, but keep at least one curriculum vitae-type everything-I’ve-ever-done copy to work from.

    • Know Your Audience
      Draw attention to your skills, but know whom you are addressing. If the school is data driven, make sure you highlight your achievements in factual, quantitative ways. Likewise, an arts-centric school would probably appreciate a more creative portfolio of work. I start with a standard format: black serif font, 10–12 point, single or space-and-a-half on crisp paper. Then I adapt for the audience.

    • Be Specific
      specific resume wordingTell exactly, succinctly, and powerfully, what you have done. Find a list of ideal skills and highlight exactly the kind of experience you have that shows you are proficient. If you are highly experienced, give figures and data support your statements.
       

    • Format Matters
      Unless you have no experience, listing positions and initiatives first is far more powerful. Employers are far less concerned with where you attended school and far more concerned with your ability to lead, teach, and be a contributing member of the group.

    • Vocabulary
      Write in the active voice. Use powerful language and don't sell yourself short. Know vocabulary and initiatives common in the position you are seeking and use them. Think of Bloom's Taxonomy and take every opportunity to frame your work in the highest levels with active verbiage.

    Interviews

    • Research
      Do your research. Reach out to any teacher, parent, or student you know at the school and get a sense of what is important. Are they totally into Project Based Learning and inquiry at the moment? Does having an arts infused curriculum matter? Is the school strictly academic focused, or are sports and activities strongly valued? Knowing the environment and even specific programs used at the school can help you answer questions, but also will determine if the school is a fit for your style too.

    • Questioninterview questions to ask
      I used to think the interviewer needed to ask all the questions, but you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Having a few questions ready can show that you have given the position thought and can demonstrate your desire to contribute to the team. 

    • Goals
      Know what you are hoping for from this job. If you are looking to take on leadership roles, don’t be afraid to ask what opportunities exist in the interview stage. If you’re hoping to grow your knowledge in a particular field, be sure to ask how the school will foster your growth. Know what you hope to get from the job just as they know what they expect of you.

    • Strong Suits
      You are talented and passionate about something or you wouldn’t want to be in the classroom. Determine the strengths you know you can bring to any team and be sure to highlight them in your interview. Be ready to back up your statements with data or demonstrations, but don’t be shy about the expertise you are bringing to share with the school.

    Job searching can really be more like soul-searching. You will doubt your abilities and value along the way, even while creating a list of your accomplishments. Have confidence in your ability to learn and adapt to any situation and know that students need you.

    Now, who is hiring? I need a new job!

    Have a great resource for education job hunters? List it in the comments! 

    follow @bamameghan

     

    My family and I are making a big move this summer — all the way across the country! I’ve been busily preparing my resumes, sending transcripts, and scouring school district web pages for job postings. Luckily, I’ve learned a couple of things about resumes and interviews both from my own experiences and while reviewing applications for various education organizations. Whether you just want to transfer across town or are gearing up for a bigger change, here are a few tips for finding your next career move.

     

     

    Resumes

    • Prepare
      The tendency is to get a resume ready only when you truly need it, so there is added pressure for it to be perfect so that you can land the interview. Go ahead and update your information every time you present or have a notable change to alleviate stress when you really need the resume. You can always cut extras out later, but keep at least one curriculum vitae-type everything-I’ve-ever-done copy to work from.

    • Know Your Audience
      Draw attention to your skills, but know whom you are addressing. If the school is data driven, make sure you highlight your achievements in factual, quantitative ways. Likewise, an arts-centric school would probably appreciate a more creative portfolio of work. I start with a standard format: black serif font, 10–12 point, single or space-and-a-half on crisp paper. Then I adapt for the audience.

    • Be Specific
      specific resume wordingTell exactly, succinctly, and powerfully, what you have done. Find a list of ideal skills and highlight exactly the kind of experience you have that shows you are proficient. If you are highly experienced, give figures and data support your statements.
       

    • Format Matters
      Unless you have no experience, listing positions and initiatives first is far more powerful. Employers are far less concerned with where you attended school and far more concerned with your ability to lead, teach, and be a contributing member of the group.

    • Vocabulary
      Write in the active voice. Use powerful language and don't sell yourself short. Know vocabulary and initiatives common in the position you are seeking and use them. Think of Bloom's Taxonomy and take every opportunity to frame your work in the highest levels with active verbiage.

    Interviews

    • Research
      Do your research. Reach out to any teacher, parent, or student you know at the school and get a sense of what is important. Are they totally into Project Based Learning and inquiry at the moment? Does having an arts infused curriculum matter? Is the school strictly academic focused, or are sports and activities strongly valued? Knowing the environment and even specific programs used at the school can help you answer questions, but also will determine if the school is a fit for your style too.

    • Questioninterview questions to ask
      I used to think the interviewer needed to ask all the questions, but you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Having a few questions ready can show that you have given the position thought and can demonstrate your desire to contribute to the team. 

    • Goals
      Know what you are hoping for from this job. If you are looking to take on leadership roles, don’t be afraid to ask what opportunities exist in the interview stage. If you’re hoping to grow your knowledge in a particular field, be sure to ask how the school will foster your growth. Know what you hope to get from the job just as they know what they expect of you.

    • Strong Suits
      You are talented and passionate about something or you wouldn’t want to be in the classroom. Determine the strengths you know you can bring to any team and be sure to highlight them in your interview. Be ready to back up your statements with data or demonstrations, but don’t be shy about the expertise you are bringing to share with the school.

    Job searching can really be more like soul-searching. You will doubt your abilities and value along the way, even while creating a list of your accomplishments. Have confidence in your ability to learn and adapt to any situation and know that students need you.

    Now, who is hiring? I need a new job!

    Have a great resource for education job hunters? List it in the comments! 

    follow @bamameghan

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