Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
October 17, 2016

Free Common Core Math Games for Every Math Monster

By Meghan Everette
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

    October is our math night and what better theme than monsters to get kids excited about math. Our school will draw in families to participate in math games as a part of a monthly family engagement night. My challenge was to create activities for a wide variety of ages that are still meaningful. I created multiple activities, some that can be done in the classroom ahead of time to create excitement and interest such as decorations, and some that can be used on the night of the event with few additional supplies.

    Whether you want to create an entire family night or just bring some monstrous fun to your math instruction, use these free math games to get you started.

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.B

    Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.

    Make it Monstrous: Students fill in varying numbers of monster eyeballs according to the listed digit. Students needing more support can use dots as guides for how many eyes to attach.

     

    Monster math eyeballs Monster eyeball differentiation

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.5

    Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 120, count out that many objects.

    Make it Monstrous: Roll a number die and color the matching dot image. Some images are not the standard dot placement, so students must subitize with numbers.

    Level Up: Address more difficult standards but rolling a die and adding or subtracting one to the shown number and then coloring the matching dot image.

    Monster math dot recording

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.C.4

    Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

    Make it Monstrous: Roll two dot or number dice (or one of each) and color the dot containing the sum.

    Level Up: Roll two dot or number dice and multiply the digits. Color the dot containing the product.

    roll and record addition

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.OA.A.1

    Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

    Make it Monstrous: Students need to understand equalities and work with different locations of missing addends. Students cut out eyeballs to fill in missing addends in equalities.

    Monster eyeball equation Monster equation eyeballs

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.B.2

    Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.C.3

    Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.

    Make it Monstrous: Use a glyph with math-themed questions that have students creating a monster while they create a beast. Students can draw, cut and paste, or use pre-made cut-outs to build their creation.

    Monster math glyph

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.C.7

    Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

    Make it Monstrous Multiplication: Students roll two dice and multiply. Then they record the answer by coloring in the part of the monster containing the product.

    Roll and Record Multiplication Monster

    Make it Monstrous Division: Use an easier or more difficult division board that shows various division problems. Give eight place markers of different colors to each player. Roll two die and add the given digits. Find an equation that matches that sum and place a marker on it. If you roll a quotient that already is covered, you can bump the opponent’s marker off the spot. If you roll a quotient that you already have a marker on, you can add a second marker. Spots with two markers cannot be bumped! The player who uses all eight markers first is the winner.

    Monster Division Bump Easier Monster Division Bump Harder

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.A

    Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

    Make it Monstrous: Taking blogger Alycia Zimmerman’s lead, students can create monsters using fraction pieces and then add the total number of pieces used. To make it easier for the start of the year, use only square pieces of limited colors to build monsters using whole and half squares only.

    Fraction key for images 

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.3

    Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.

    Make it Monstrous: Fill in a 100 grid to create a monster image. Fellow blogger Genia Connell used this same technique in math, and I have used it with holiday images as well. Count the number of squares used for each image and list as a fraction of 100, a simplified fraction, and a decimal. Pump of the difficulty by adding in recording the result as a percentage.

    Many of these monster math activities can be completed with any theme, though we are looking forward to a fun-filled family event that highlights the monster math learning happening this fall.

    October is our math night and what better theme than monsters to get kids excited about math. Our school will draw in families to participate in math games as a part of a monthly family engagement night. My challenge was to create activities for a wide variety of ages that are still meaningful. I created multiple activities, some that can be done in the classroom ahead of time to create excitement and interest such as decorations, and some that can be used on the night of the event with few additional supplies.

    Whether you want to create an entire family night or just bring some monstrous fun to your math instruction, use these free math games to get you started.

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.4.B

    Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.

    Make it Monstrous: Students fill in varying numbers of monster eyeballs according to the listed digit. Students needing more support can use dots as guides for how many eyes to attach.

     

    Monster math eyeballs Monster eyeball differentiation

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.K.CC.B.5

    Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 120, count out that many objects.

    Make it Monstrous: Roll a number die and color the matching dot image. Some images are not the standard dot placement, so students must subitize with numbers.

    Level Up: Address more difficult standards but rolling a die and adding or subtracting one to the shown number and then coloring the matching dot image.

    Monster math dot recording

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.NBT.C.4

    Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

    Make it Monstrous: Roll two dot or number dice (or one of each) and color the dot containing the sum.

    Level Up: Roll two dot or number dice and multiply the digits. Color the dot containing the product.

    roll and record addition

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.OA.A.1

    Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

    Make it Monstrous: Students need to understand equalities and work with different locations of missing addends. Students cut out eyeballs to fill in missing addends in equalities.

    Monster eyeball equation Monster equation eyeballs

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.B.2

    Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.OA.C.3

    Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.

    Make it Monstrous: Use a glyph with math-themed questions that have students creating a monster while they create a beast. Students can draw, cut and paste, or use pre-made cut-outs to build their creation.

    Monster math glyph

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.C.7

    Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

    Make it Monstrous Multiplication: Students roll two dice and multiply. Then they record the answer by coloring in the part of the monster containing the product.

    Roll and Record Multiplication Monster

    Make it Monstrous Division: Use an easier or more difficult division board that shows various division problems. Give eight place markers of different colors to each player. Roll two die and add the given digits. Find an equation that matches that sum and place a marker on it. If you roll a quotient that already is covered, you can bump the opponent’s marker off the spot. If you roll a quotient that you already have a marker on, you can add a second marker. Spots with two markers cannot be bumped! The player who uses all eight markers first is the winner.

    Monster Division Bump Easier Monster Division Bump Harder

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NF.B.3.A

    Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts referring to the same whole.

    Make it Monstrous: Taking blogger Alycia Zimmerman’s lead, students can create monsters using fraction pieces and then add the total number of pieces used. To make it easier for the start of the year, use only square pieces of limited colors to build monsters using whole and half squares only.

    Fraction key for images 

     

    CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.5.NBT.A.3

    Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.

    Make it Monstrous: Fill in a 100 grid to create a monster image. Fellow blogger Genia Connell used this same technique in math, and I have used it with holiday images as well. Count the number of squares used for each image and list as a fraction of 100, a simplified fraction, and a decimal. Pump of the difficulty by adding in recording the result as a percentage.

    Many of these monster math activities can be completed with any theme, though we are looking forward to a fun-filled family event that highlights the monster math learning happening this fall.

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Meghan's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
One-Stop January Shop: Every Resource You Need

Get great ideas, lessons, resources, interactives, and more for January. Celebrate the new year and Chinese New Year, and embrace the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with tips, books, and a host of other materials!

By Meghan Everette
January 2, 2017
Blog Post
13 Big Ideas for Big Nate and Other Graphic Novels

Read on for 13 ideas for teaching with Big Nate's box set and every graphic novel. Capitalize on student interest and hit reading skills hard with the visually-rich format.

By Meghan Everette
December 6, 2016
Blog Post
December Resources for Winter Holidays

Get links to winter projects and ideas for Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and more. Find books, articles, blogs, crafts, and Printables for celebrating diversity and heritage all year long.

By Meghan Everette
November 21, 2016
Blog Post
November: Free Resources From the Election to Thanksgiving

Grab more than 100 November resources for Veterans Day, Aviation History Month, the 2016 Election, and Thanksgiving. Get links to interactives, lesson plans, articles, blog posts, and printable resources to plan easily with Scholastic all November long.

By Meghan Everette
October 24, 2016
Blog Post
October Resources for Halloween and More

Get great teaching resources for October themes like fire prevention, anti-bullying, report cards, conferences, and Halloween.

By Meghan Everette
September 30, 2016

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us