Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
April 7, 2015

5 Ways to Have Fun Reviewing: Test Prep and Practice

By Meghan Everette
Grades 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

     

    Test season is upon us, and whether you are preparing for state and national tests, or just reviewing concepts taught throughout the year, having a few fun and effective ways to keep kids focused is important. Throw in a couple of these methods to spice up your assessment routine and keep kids engaged throughout test-prep.

     

     

    Know Your ABCs

    Word cloud abc

    Have teams or individuals supply important vocabulary terms for each letter of the alphabet around a specific concept. For example, when reviewing weather, teams might come up with Anemometer, Barometer, Cumulous, etc. Combine the terms into a main list that all students can work from when reviewing. Students might remember some terms off the top of their head, but they will have to use texts and search for others, which is a great review in itself. Make interesting anchor charts by putting the terms into a Wordle or using Tagxedo with a picture shape that coordinates.

     

     

    Create a Board Game

    printable dragon gameboard

    Print a board game, or use one from a classic game. To make sure students focus on the right thing, lay out the game rules in advance. Students come up with the review questions and write them on index cards cut in half. They can leave answers open-ended, or provide answer choices. Then have students play the games, rotating around. Make the game digital with free tools like Kahoot.

    • Create math word problems and the fastest answer wins.

    • Provide a reading passage for all players. Have students answer questions about the passage to move ahead.

    • Give real-life examples of a science process and find the scientific term to describe it.

    • Make charades with different terms and take turns acting out the vocabulary

    Charades kahoot example

    Get Sporty

    Make a large game board that looks like a football field, basketball court, or baseball field. Divide players into teams. Each correct answer earns a move, such as a base hit or a first down. Wrong answers are strikes, fouls, or turnovers. Switch up teams often to keep students interested and keep the game from being lopsided. This can be used once, or as an ongoing challenge each time you have summative results.

     

    Three Truths

    The premise is simple: each person writes three truths and one lie. They read the four statements and other players guess which one is the lie. To apply this to review, have students write three historic facts, science processes, or mathematical equations, and one false or wrong fact. To use with comprehension, have students chunk up longer text, or ask them to read short paragraphs, then create three correct summaries or inferences about characters and one that is misstated or misinterpreted. Students can rotate in small groups to play, or the entire class can play at once. Making the results digital, with the help of Socrative or another online review tool, will ensure each student answers. Plus you can see how many are incorrect before continuing.

    Socrative example Practicing with Kahoot

    Riddle Me This

    Jeopardy template

    Stretch students’ writing abilities and review at the same time. Have each student or group create a rhyming riddle that asks a math problem, asks for a character clue, or hints at a historic event. Put them into subject categories and play with Jeopardy-style rules, letting students pick the category and question value. Play as individually or as teams.

    writing questions together

     

    Keeping energy up, behaviors tamed, and learning going through review can be tough. A few interesting and new ways to cover information can keep kids engaged.

    What ways do you help kids review?

     

     

    Test season is upon us, and whether you are preparing for state and national tests, or just reviewing concepts taught throughout the year, having a few fun and effective ways to keep kids focused is important. Throw in a couple of these methods to spice up your assessment routine and keep kids engaged throughout test-prep.

     

     

    Know Your ABCs

    Word cloud abc

    Have teams or individuals supply important vocabulary terms for each letter of the alphabet around a specific concept. For example, when reviewing weather, teams might come up with Anemometer, Barometer, Cumulous, etc. Combine the terms into a main list that all students can work from when reviewing. Students might remember some terms off the top of their head, but they will have to use texts and search for others, which is a great review in itself. Make interesting anchor charts by putting the terms into a Wordle or using Tagxedo with a picture shape that coordinates.

     

     

    Create a Board Game

    printable dragon gameboard

    Print a board game, or use one from a classic game. To make sure students focus on the right thing, lay out the game rules in advance. Students come up with the review questions and write them on index cards cut in half. They can leave answers open-ended, or provide answer choices. Then have students play the games, rotating around. Make the game digital with free tools like Kahoot.

    • Create math word problems and the fastest answer wins.

    • Provide a reading passage for all players. Have students answer questions about the passage to move ahead.

    • Give real-life examples of a science process and find the scientific term to describe it.

    • Make charades with different terms and take turns acting out the vocabulary

    Charades kahoot example

    Get Sporty

    Make a large game board that looks like a football field, basketball court, or baseball field. Divide players into teams. Each correct answer earns a move, such as a base hit or a first down. Wrong answers are strikes, fouls, or turnovers. Switch up teams often to keep students interested and keep the game from being lopsided. This can be used once, or as an ongoing challenge each time you have summative results.

     

    Three Truths

    The premise is simple: each person writes three truths and one lie. They read the four statements and other players guess which one is the lie. To apply this to review, have students write three historic facts, science processes, or mathematical equations, and one false or wrong fact. To use with comprehension, have students chunk up longer text, or ask them to read short paragraphs, then create three correct summaries or inferences about characters and one that is misstated or misinterpreted. Students can rotate in small groups to play, or the entire class can play at once. Making the results digital, with the help of Socrative or another online review tool, will ensure each student answers. Plus you can see how many are incorrect before continuing.

    Socrative example Practicing with Kahoot

    Riddle Me This

    Jeopardy template

    Stretch students’ writing abilities and review at the same time. Have each student or group create a rhyming riddle that asks a math problem, asks for a character clue, or hints at a historic event. Put them into subject categories and play with Jeopardy-style rules, letting students pick the category and question value. Play as individually or as teams.

    writing questions together

     

    Keeping energy up, behaviors tamed, and learning going through review can be tough. A few interesting and new ways to cover information can keep kids engaged.

    What ways do you help kids review?

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Meghan's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
One-Stop January Shop: Every Resource You Need

Get great ideas, lessons, resources, interactives, and more for January. Celebrate the new year and Chinese New Year, and embrace the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with tips, books, and a host of other materials!

By Meghan Everette
January 2, 2017
Blog Post
13 Big Ideas for Big Nate and Other Graphic Novels

Read on for 13 ideas for teaching with Big Nate's box set and every graphic novel. Capitalize on student interest and hit reading skills hard with the visually-rich format.

By Meghan Everette
December 6, 2016
Blog Post
December Resources for Winter Holidays

Get links to winter projects and ideas for Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and more. Find books, articles, blogs, crafts, and Printables for celebrating diversity and heritage all year long.

By Meghan Everette
November 21, 2016
Blog Post
November: Free Resources From the Election to Thanksgiving

Grab more than 100 November resources for Veterans Day, Aviation History Month, the 2016 Election, and Thanksgiving. Get links to interactives, lesson plans, articles, blog posts, and printable resources to plan easily with Scholastic all November long.

By Meghan Everette
October 24, 2016
Blog Post
Free Common Core Math Games for Every Math Monster

Print free, differentiated math games with a monster theme for math night or a monstrous math class. Get kindergarten through fifth grade Common Core aligned math activities.

By Meghan Everette
October 17, 2016

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us