Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
January 25, 2011 Scripps Spelling Bee By Mary Blow
Grades 6–8

    Do your students compete in a spelling bee? After months of preparation, the Scripps National Spelling Bee competition is under way. Last week, Lowville Academy hosted a local level of the spelling bee. Mrs. Petzoldt, our 8th grade English teacher, coached the students and chaired the event. Read on to find resources to support students in their quest to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, an annual event.

     

    Liam petzoldt

    LACS Local Spelling Bee Winner

    For the past three years, I have been fortunate enough to be one of the three spelling bee judges. The entire middle school attends an assembly to watch the exciting competition. This year was exceptionally exciting as two students battled each other word after word for first place. In the end, a 6th grade boy, pictured with Mrs. Petzoldt at the right, won the competition and will go on to the regional spelling bee competitions in March. You can bet that he will be studying feverishly. Students who participated in the spelling bee each received a yearlong subscription to Britannica Online for Kids and a free online foreign language course.

    Introducing Students to the Spelling Bee

     Introduce your students to the Scripps National Spelling Bee by watching Akeelah and the Bee starring Laurence Fishburne, Angela Bassett, and Keke Palmer. The inspirational movie portrays a young girl who overcomes barriers in her life by focusing on her one talent, spelling, and competing in the National Spelling Bee. If you don’t have time to watch the entire movie, excerpts can be downloaded for educational purposes at WingClips. You will need to sign up for a free educator’s account.

    Registering for the Event

    To see if your students are eligible to participate, read the eligibility guidelines on the Scripps Web site. Registration information and student study materials are also available there. The annual registration period is from mid-August to early December. It is too late to register for the 2010–2011 school year; however, it is not too late to begin training.

    Getting in Shape for the Event

    Big_iq_kids1 Serious competitors study for the annual event. Scripps provides a student resource, “How to Study for a Spelling Bee,” which is a great place for students to start. Scripps partnered with Merriam-Webster to create the Spell It study site. Select the language of origin and practice in a simulated spelling bee format. Other online resources that make spelling fun include:

    • Kids Spell: select a premade spelling list or customize your own. Create lists with the top 100 misspelled words.
    • BigIQ Kids offers a free spelling program for individuals or teachers (limited to 32 student accounts). Create a spelling bee avatar and compete in simulated spelling bee competitions.
    • Scholastic Spelling Wizard: Type in a word list and the wizard will convert it into a scramble or word search puzzle to practice spelling.
    • Spelling Bee (Learner.org Interactives): This site has interactive games. Select word lists by grade, from 1–12.
    • Harcourt Brace Spelling: Animated spelling practice available by grade level.

    The spelling bee is a great way to motivate middle school students to engage in etymology. If you want more information, please feel free to contact me. And please list your own great ideas below.

      Do your students compete in a spelling bee? After months of preparation, the Scripps National Spelling Bee competition is under way. Last week, Lowville Academy hosted a local level of the spelling bee. Mrs. Petzoldt, our 8th grade English teacher, coached the students and chaired the event. Read on to find resources to support students in their quest to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, an annual event.

       

      Liam petzoldt

      LACS Local Spelling Bee Winner

      For the past three years, I have been fortunate enough to be one of the three spelling bee judges. The entire middle school attends an assembly to watch the exciting competition. This year was exceptionally exciting as two students battled each other word after word for first place. In the end, a 6th grade boy, pictured with Mrs. Petzoldt at the right, won the competition and will go on to the regional spelling bee competitions in March. You can bet that he will be studying feverishly. Students who participated in the spelling bee each received a yearlong subscription to Britannica Online for Kids and a free online foreign language course.

      Introducing Students to the Spelling Bee

       Introduce your students to the Scripps National Spelling Bee by watching Akeelah and the Bee starring Laurence Fishburne, Angela Bassett, and Keke Palmer. The inspirational movie portrays a young girl who overcomes barriers in her life by focusing on her one talent, spelling, and competing in the National Spelling Bee. If you don’t have time to watch the entire movie, excerpts can be downloaded for educational purposes at WingClips. You will need to sign up for a free educator’s account.

      Registering for the Event

      To see if your students are eligible to participate, read the eligibility guidelines on the Scripps Web site. Registration information and student study materials are also available there. The annual registration period is from mid-August to early December. It is too late to register for the 2010–2011 school year; however, it is not too late to begin training.

      Getting in Shape for the Event

      Big_iq_kids1 Serious competitors study for the annual event. Scripps provides a student resource, “How to Study for a Spelling Bee,” which is a great place for students to start. Scripps partnered with Merriam-Webster to create the Spell It study site. Select the language of origin and practice in a simulated spelling bee format. Other online resources that make spelling fun include:

      • Kids Spell: select a premade spelling list or customize your own. Create lists with the top 100 misspelled words.
      • BigIQ Kids offers a free spelling program for individuals or teachers (limited to 32 student accounts). Create a spelling bee avatar and compete in simulated spelling bee competitions.
      • Scholastic Spelling Wizard: Type in a word list and the wizard will convert it into a scramble or word search puzzle to practice spelling.
      • Spelling Bee (Learner.org Interactives): This site has interactive games. Select word lists by grade, from 1–12.
      • Harcourt Brace Spelling: Animated spelling practice available by grade level.

      The spelling bee is a great way to motivate middle school students to engage in etymology. If you want more information, please feel free to contact me. And please list your own great ideas below.

      Comments

      Share your ideas about this article

      My Scholastic

      Susan Cheyney

      GRADES: 1-2
      About Us