Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
May 21, 2015

Prepare, Conduct, and Reflect on Student Surveys

By Kriscia Cabral
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

    Reflection is a huge part of growth. Taking the time to reflect allows you as a teacher to plan next best steps, find new ways to facilitate learning, and build stronger relationships with students. One way to reflect upon the success of your school year is by asking your main customers, your students.

    To conduct a student survey, follow these three steps:

     

    Step One: Set the Tone

    I set the tone by having a discussion with my students about honest feedback.

    The expectation of how to give feedback has been set and reviewed throughout the year. I display a visual reminder slide for students to refer to. I say, 

    “When we are giving feedback we need to make sure that we are honest. It is through feedback that we grow and find ways to improve on something we might not have been good at before.

    We need to use ‘I’ statements. It is fine if something did not work for you. Explain your side of why I need to reflect on how I shared learning with you.

    If you are giving feedback, remember to find an example of what you did/didn’t like. If it was something you didn’t like, offer a suggestion to try.”

     

    Step Two: Deliver the Survey

    The student survey does not need a ton of questions. As a teacher I want to know the following things:

    • What do you (students) think I did well?

    • How can I improve in at least two ways?

    • What rating would you give my: kindness, helpfulness, communication, and creativeness?

    Give the student survey to your class. You can distribute a paper copy or create a digital copy for students to complete. Remind them to be honest as they answer the questions. Students sometimes want to be nice because they love you. You have to remind them of this opportunity to help you grow as a learner as well.

     

    Step Three: Analyze Your Data

    As you wrap up the school year, make a note of what your students noticed. They are your customers. When analyzing your data, ask yourself the following:

    • What did you do well? (Celebrate!)

    • What suggestions were common amongst the majority of your students?

    • What can you do to improve for your incoming customers? 

    Take your notes and plan for the future. Think about one or two ways you can change your instruction, attitude, ability to communicate, or creativity in the classroom so that it meets the needs of your students.

    Use your summer to reflect on what you've learned based on your students' voices and then plan for the upcoming school year.

    I take notes on a goal-planning template. I keep it in a place where I can visually see it over the summer and at the start of the new school year. Store your notes in your school planner for next year (Yes, this is a great time to get one!) or anywhere you plan to keep notes about what to remember for the new school year. Referring back to this information is a good reminder of your goals for the new year.

    The smallest change can make the biggest difference in a child’s learning environment. Use this student survey as one form of reflection based on those who spend the most time with you.

    What ways to you reflect at the end of the school year? I’d love to hear more suggestions below.

    Thank you for reading!

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

     

     

     

    Reflection is a huge part of growth. Taking the time to reflect allows you as a teacher to plan next best steps, find new ways to facilitate learning, and build stronger relationships with students. One way to reflect upon the success of your school year is by asking your main customers, your students.

    To conduct a student survey, follow these three steps:

     

    Step One: Set the Tone

    I set the tone by having a discussion with my students about honest feedback.

    The expectation of how to give feedback has been set and reviewed throughout the year. I display a visual reminder slide for students to refer to. I say, 

    “When we are giving feedback we need to make sure that we are honest. It is through feedback that we grow and find ways to improve on something we might not have been good at before.

    We need to use ‘I’ statements. It is fine if something did not work for you. Explain your side of why I need to reflect on how I shared learning with you.

    If you are giving feedback, remember to find an example of what you did/didn’t like. If it was something you didn’t like, offer a suggestion to try.”

     

    Step Two: Deliver the Survey

    The student survey does not need a ton of questions. As a teacher I want to know the following things:

    • What do you (students) think I did well?

    • How can I improve in at least two ways?

    • What rating would you give my: kindness, helpfulness, communication, and creativeness?

    Give the student survey to your class. You can distribute a paper copy or create a digital copy for students to complete. Remind them to be honest as they answer the questions. Students sometimes want to be nice because they love you. You have to remind them of this opportunity to help you grow as a learner as well.

     

    Step Three: Analyze Your Data

    As you wrap up the school year, make a note of what your students noticed. They are your customers. When analyzing your data, ask yourself the following:

    • What did you do well? (Celebrate!)

    • What suggestions were common amongst the majority of your students?

    • What can you do to improve for your incoming customers? 

    Take your notes and plan for the future. Think about one or two ways you can change your instruction, attitude, ability to communicate, or creativity in the classroom so that it meets the needs of your students.

    Use your summer to reflect on what you've learned based on your students' voices and then plan for the upcoming school year.

    I take notes on a goal-planning template. I keep it in a place where I can visually see it over the summer and at the start of the new school year. Store your notes in your school planner for next year (Yes, this is a great time to get one!) or anywhere you plan to keep notes about what to remember for the new school year. Referring back to this information is a good reminder of your goals for the new year.

    The smallest change can make the biggest difference in a child’s learning environment. Use this student survey as one form of reflection based on those who spend the most time with you.

    What ways to you reflect at the end of the school year? I’d love to hear more suggestions below.

    Thank you for reading!

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

     

     

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Kriscia's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
Picture Books That Inspire Student Writing

Finding a starting place to spark student ideas for writing time can be tricky. Here are books I use for idea starters, along with prompts and suggestions to get your students inspired and ready to write at the start of the school year and beyond.

By Kriscia Cabral
September 9, 2016
Blog Post
Showcasing Evidence of Student Learning
It's time again to wrap up projects, clean out work spaces, and show what your students have been up to all year. Creating a showcase where students can provide evidence of learning is one way of doing this.
By Kriscia Cabral
May 13, 2016
Blog Post
Earth Day Public Service Announcements

Introduce your students to the role of public service announcements by creating Earth Day PSAs. Read on to see how you can prep now for a student-created finished product that’s ready to go by Earth Day!

 

By Kriscia Cabral
April 13, 2016
Blog Post
Your Go-To Guide for Close Reading

Read on to see how I took one Scholastic resource and used it to help students find ownership of learning, and promote engaged reading in the classroom.

By Kriscia Cabral
March 9, 2016
Blog Post
Reviewing the Writing Process With Play-Doh!

Here’s a lesson that uses Play-Doh as the writing “tool.” Students go through the process of writing while connecting it to an activity they can’t resist.

By Kriscia Cabral
February 12, 2016
My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us