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February 5, 2015 Connecting Time to the Real World By Kriscia Cabral
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Students need to understand that telling time is more than just a math standard, it is a life skill. I wanted to make sure my second graders had a clear understanding of time as a measure of something, and to help them find a way to make a real-world connection. Read on to find out how to integrate literacy and real-world learning into a lesson on telling time.

     

    Introduction

    To introduce the concept of time, I started with the question on the board: “How do we use time?” Students' answers focused on how time tells us when things start and when things end and how time tells us when we should be doing certain things like sleeping and waking up. After hearing the different student responses, I took a moment to share a story and asked students to think about how time plays a role in the lead character's life.

     

    Literacy Connection

    I read What Time Is It, Mr. Crocodile? by Judy Sierra. This book is all about Mr. Crocodile and his plans for the day. The repetitive question of “What time is it, Mr. Crocodile?" present on every page, lends itself to prompting students to observe and determine what time it is. Students discovered how Mr. Crocodile’s plan of eating the pesky monkeys changed by the time he was ready to eat dinner and was looking for a friend.

    As I read the story, I stopped and we examined the clock on the page. Before I announced the time, I asked the question, “What do you notice?” Students talked about where the big hand was, where the little hand was, and of course, everything else they saw in the picture. This was actually great conversation because I could then prompt the question of “Is it A.M. or is it P.M. and how do they know?" After every page we read, we discussed how the clock looked, how the time changed, and if it was still A.M. or P.M. Students were able to make this last detemination by whether it was day or night and what activities were involved.

    By the end of the story we determined that for every o’clock time, the big hand always stayed on the 12 and the little hand kept moving to the o’clock. We also noticed how the A.M. changed after 12, and that Mr. Crocodile was on a schedule for his day. 

     

    Math Connections

    We connected Mr. Crocodile's schedule to our own and started thinking about the things that we do when we do them. Students talked about bedtimes, wake-up times, soccer practice times, and so much more. We then determined whether these times were in the morning or afternoon, based on the activity.

    Once we finished our conversation, we needed to put our math learning to the test. Students completed this partner activity together. They drew a line on their table or paper space dividing it into two halves. One side for A.M. and the other for P.M. Students were given a bag with cards on which were written daily routine activities and the times when you would do them. (I cut the items up prior to the start of the activity.)

    One example would be an activity card that reads: Get ready for school, 7:00 (digital or analog). Students need to place the activity card in either the A.M. side or P.M. side. Because there are a number of cards with different times on each, students need to put the cards not only on the appropriate side, but also in the appropriate order. After partners work together to put the activity cards in order, check their work and discuss any errors if needed.

     

    Extension

    As an extension activity, I assigned students the task of recreating our school schedule.

    I shared the parameters of the activity and then students were off to design. Every schedule designed needed to be designed with purpose. Students would have the opportunity to present their reasoning behind their schedule and needed to be ready to explain to their classmates.

    How do you cover time in your classroom? I’d love to hear more ideas!

    Thank you for reading.

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

    Students need to understand that telling time is more than just a math standard, it is a life skill. I wanted to make sure my second graders had a clear understanding of time as a measure of something, and to help them find a way to make a real-world connection. Read on to find out how to integrate literacy and real-world learning into a lesson on telling time.

     

    Introduction

    To introduce the concept of time, I started with the question on the board: “How do we use time?” Students' answers focused on how time tells us when things start and when things end and how time tells us when we should be doing certain things like sleeping and waking up. After hearing the different student responses, I took a moment to share a story and asked students to think about how time plays a role in the lead character's life.

     

    Literacy Connection

    I read What Time Is It, Mr. Crocodile? by Judy Sierra. This book is all about Mr. Crocodile and his plans for the day. The repetitive question of “What time is it, Mr. Crocodile?" present on every page, lends itself to prompting students to observe and determine what time it is. Students discovered how Mr. Crocodile’s plan of eating the pesky monkeys changed by the time he was ready to eat dinner and was looking for a friend.

    As I read the story, I stopped and we examined the clock on the page. Before I announced the time, I asked the question, “What do you notice?” Students talked about where the big hand was, where the little hand was, and of course, everything else they saw in the picture. This was actually great conversation because I could then prompt the question of “Is it A.M. or is it P.M. and how do they know?" After every page we read, we discussed how the clock looked, how the time changed, and if it was still A.M. or P.M. Students were able to make this last detemination by whether it was day or night and what activities were involved.

    By the end of the story we determined that for every o’clock time, the big hand always stayed on the 12 and the little hand kept moving to the o’clock. We also noticed how the A.M. changed after 12, and that Mr. Crocodile was on a schedule for his day. 

     

    Math Connections

    We connected Mr. Crocodile's schedule to our own and started thinking about the things that we do when we do them. Students talked about bedtimes, wake-up times, soccer practice times, and so much more. We then determined whether these times were in the morning or afternoon, based on the activity.

    Once we finished our conversation, we needed to put our math learning to the test. Students completed this partner activity together. They drew a line on their table or paper space dividing it into two halves. One side for A.M. and the other for P.M. Students were given a bag with cards on which were written daily routine activities and the times when you would do them. (I cut the items up prior to the start of the activity.)

    One example would be an activity card that reads: Get ready for school, 7:00 (digital or analog). Students need to place the activity card in either the A.M. side or P.M. side. Because there are a number of cards with different times on each, students need to put the cards not only on the appropriate side, but also in the appropriate order. After partners work together to put the activity cards in order, check their work and discuss any errors if needed.

     

    Extension

    As an extension activity, I assigned students the task of recreating our school schedule.

    I shared the parameters of the activity and then students were off to design. Every schedule designed needed to be designed with purpose. Students would have the opportunity to present their reasoning behind their schedule and needed to be ready to explain to their classmates.

    How do you cover time in your classroom? I’d love to hear more ideas!

    Thank you for reading.

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

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