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October 3, 2013

Bring Common Core Alive With Tellagami

By Kriscia Cabral
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

    An important goal of the Common Core State Standards is to get students in discussions about their learning. The Tellagami app is a great way to engage kids in this type of sharing what they know.

    Over the summer, I joined a professional learning class for all things Google. Along the way, I was introduced to this fabulous app. Tellagami works on mobile devices allowing the user to share "Gami" animated videos. It is a four-step process that produces amazing results.

    The user:

    1. Creates a character

    2. Chooses a background

    3. Records vocals and/or adds text

    4. Previews and shares

    I was blown away by the possibilities!

    Ways to Use Tellagami

     

    • Project Sharing

    Students can add a project to a Tellagami video using their own customized settings. They can then share the project with the class letting their Gami do the talking (from their pre-recording). Here is an example of my students creating a Gami to present a “Math About Me” poster.

    • Teacher-Created Lessons

    We are in the process of flipping our math class for students. I intend to use the app as an exciting way to share information, reminders, and math strategies through the Gami creations.

    • Paragraph Writing and Sharing

    If students are working on paragraph writing, have them choose a topic, create their paragraph, and then record their work with Tellagami, making it accessible to all. This is especially a great activity for English language students. Have them use three new vocabulary words as a visual, out of which they can create sentences.

    • Fluency Reading

    In my post about 5 Time-Saving Assessment Ideas, I mention that I record my students reading so they can listen to themselves with the purpose of improving their fluency. Using Tellagami instead of basic recording adds interest and excitement to student learning.

    • Book Reports

    One new way I’d like to incorporate Tellagami into my room is with book reports. I plan to have my students write a prompt or idea based on their independent reading book. I will then take a picture of the book and use that as the background while they talk about why it would be a good book to read.

    .

    A way to extend use of these fun and creative Gamis is to share them once students are finished. I’ve tried two different ways of sharing. First, if you click on "Share," a link will pop up. This link can be copied and pasted into a QR code creator. The generated code can be posted the code to the student's work. This way when parents come to your room, they can scan the project and watch the Gami come to life.

    The second extension idea came to me by chance. That plan was to save the Gamis to my iPad (they won’t save to computers, it’s a device-only app). After I saved the Gamis, I uploaded them to my computer and then into Aurasma. My class is now divided with math posters that can be scanned with a QR code on the one side, and Aurasma projects on the other. The kids get a kick out of both.

    I'm betting your kids come up with ideas of their own, and you probably have a few uses I have overlooked. Please share them!

    An important goal of the Common Core State Standards is to get students in discussions about their learning. The Tellagami app is a great way to engage kids in this type of sharing what they know.

    Over the summer, I joined a professional learning class for all things Google. Along the way, I was introduced to this fabulous app. Tellagami works on mobile devices allowing the user to share "Gami" animated videos. It is a four-step process that produces amazing results.

    The user:

    1. Creates a character

    2. Chooses a background

    3. Records vocals and/or adds text

    4. Previews and shares

    I was blown away by the possibilities!

    Ways to Use Tellagami

     

    • Project Sharing

    Students can add a project to a Tellagami video using their own customized settings. They can then share the project with the class letting their Gami do the talking (from their pre-recording). Here is an example of my students creating a Gami to present a “Math About Me” poster.

    • Teacher-Created Lessons

    We are in the process of flipping our math class for students. I intend to use the app as an exciting way to share information, reminders, and math strategies through the Gami creations.

    • Paragraph Writing and Sharing

    If students are working on paragraph writing, have them choose a topic, create their paragraph, and then record their work with Tellagami, making it accessible to all. This is especially a great activity for English language students. Have them use three new vocabulary words as a visual, out of which they can create sentences.

    • Fluency Reading

    In my post about 5 Time-Saving Assessment Ideas, I mention that I record my students reading so they can listen to themselves with the purpose of improving their fluency. Using Tellagami instead of basic recording adds interest and excitement to student learning.

    • Book Reports

    One new way I’d like to incorporate Tellagami into my room is with book reports. I plan to have my students write a prompt or idea based on their independent reading book. I will then take a picture of the book and use that as the background while they talk about why it would be a good book to read.

    .

    A way to extend use of these fun and creative Gamis is to share them once students are finished. I’ve tried two different ways of sharing. First, if you click on "Share," a link will pop up. This link can be copied and pasted into a QR code creator. The generated code can be posted the code to the student's work. This way when parents come to your room, they can scan the project and watch the Gami come to life.

    The second extension idea came to me by chance. That plan was to save the Gamis to my iPad (they won’t save to computers, it’s a device-only app). After I saved the Gamis, I uploaded them to my computer and then into Aurasma. My class is now divided with math posters that can be scanned with a QR code on the one side, and Aurasma projects on the other. The kids get a kick out of both.

    I'm betting your kids come up with ideas of their own, and you probably have a few uses I have overlooked. Please share them!

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