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March 26, 2018

Show Evidence of Learning With Collages

By Kriscia Cabral
Grades 3–5, 6–8

    I remember reading about an idea for assessments in the classroom from the book, 25 Quick Formative Assessments for the Differentiated Classroom by Judith Dodge. In the book, Dodge outlines how to create unit collages, which can be done for any subject. I took her concept and used it for my kids to create a book report collage on a book we recently finished. You can use this concept for any book that you are reading either whole class or independently.

    I introduced the concept of a collage at the beginning of our reading. This helped students with their note-taking process. I shared this Collage Creations slide presentation whole class.

     

    We talked about what a collage is and what our end result should be. Because we use Top Teaching blogger Genia Connell’s bookmarks that she created for her “The Year of Disrupted Thinking” post as a guide for reading, we outlined this page in our notebooks that looked similar. This page helped us to document what we would need by the end of the book for collages.

    Creating a Rubric

    As a class we created a rubric so that students could be aware of what the end should look like. I gathered what we discussed and created this typed version for student use during presentations.

    Modeling Together

    We completed the first chapter of our book together. If you are having students read different books, I would suggest you model the note-taking step together with a picture book so that students have a better understanding of how to choose material or an image and then be able to explain why they chose that material or image to represent a part of the story they read.

    Gathering Materials

    Students know what the project expectations are. Students have an outline format that can be used to gather notes. They now need to gather materials and create the collage.

    I took out all of my expired issues of Scholastic News, Storyworks and SuperScience for students to use. I told them to use what they could, and read an old article while they were at it. If there were materials or images that they wanted and I didn’t have, they would have to find it outside of class or create an image of it themselves.

    Literature Expectations

    Story Elements:

    I use a graphic organizer such as the Scholastic Story Map as a template that my students can follow and highlight once they represent each part of the story in their collage.

    Opinion Paragraph:

    The final expectation that I had for students was for them to add an opinion paragraph on the back of their collage. This required students to provide an opinion, give a reason to support their opinion, and provide accurate evidence from the story.

    Presentations

    On presentation day, students were required to share about their collage and read their opinion to others. Audience members could ask students about materials or images that were present on the collage. Students had to be able to respond with what it was, and how it represented an important element of the story. I printed this class-made rubric for grading purposes.

    Was this a quality and purposeful presentation of learning? I’d say most definitely! Students were engaged and excited. They had conversations with each other about what materials they wanted to find and why. Every piece on their collage had a purpose and the craft of collaging can now be applied to many areas of our learning!

    Do you have other creative ways that you assess student learning? I’d love to hear about them! Please share!

    Thank you for reading!

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

     

    I remember reading about an idea for assessments in the classroom from the book, 25 Quick Formative Assessments for the Differentiated Classroom by Judith Dodge. In the book, Dodge outlines how to create unit collages, which can be done for any subject. I took her concept and used it for my kids to create a book report collage on a book we recently finished. You can use this concept for any book that you are reading either whole class or independently.

    I introduced the concept of a collage at the beginning of our reading. This helped students with their note-taking process. I shared this Collage Creations slide presentation whole class.

     

    We talked about what a collage is and what our end result should be. Because we use Top Teaching blogger Genia Connell’s bookmarks that she created for her “The Year of Disrupted Thinking” post as a guide for reading, we outlined this page in our notebooks that looked similar. This page helped us to document what we would need by the end of the book for collages.

    Creating a Rubric

    As a class we created a rubric so that students could be aware of what the end should look like. I gathered what we discussed and created this typed version for student use during presentations.

    Modeling Together

    We completed the first chapter of our book together. If you are having students read different books, I would suggest you model the note-taking step together with a picture book so that students have a better understanding of how to choose material or an image and then be able to explain why they chose that material or image to represent a part of the story they read.

    Gathering Materials

    Students know what the project expectations are. Students have an outline format that can be used to gather notes. They now need to gather materials and create the collage.

    I took out all of my expired issues of Scholastic News, Storyworks and SuperScience for students to use. I told them to use what they could, and read an old article while they were at it. If there were materials or images that they wanted and I didn’t have, they would have to find it outside of class or create an image of it themselves.

    Literature Expectations

    Story Elements:

    I use a graphic organizer such as the Scholastic Story Map as a template that my students can follow and highlight once they represent each part of the story in their collage.

    Opinion Paragraph:

    The final expectation that I had for students was for them to add an opinion paragraph on the back of their collage. This required students to provide an opinion, give a reason to support their opinion, and provide accurate evidence from the story.

    Presentations

    On presentation day, students were required to share about their collage and read their opinion to others. Audience members could ask students about materials or images that were present on the collage. Students had to be able to respond with what it was, and how it represented an important element of the story. I printed this class-made rubric for grading purposes.

    Was this a quality and purposeful presentation of learning? I’d say most definitely! Students were engaged and excited. They had conversations with each other about what materials they wanted to find and why. Every piece on their collage had a purpose and the craft of collaging can now be applied to many areas of our learning!

    Do you have other creative ways that you assess student learning? I’d love to hear about them! Please share!

    Thank you for reading!

    Smiles,

    Kriscia

     

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