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May 21, 2012

Turning a Classroom Assignment Into a Scholastic Art and Writing Award Entry

By Jeremy Rinkel
Grades 6–8, 9–12

    Students will be creative if we allow time in our day for assignments that foster creativity. When I teach novels, I allow students to express their knowledge of particular concepts through art and writing. Instead of creating a pointless assignment, students have a purpose, to create the best writing or artwork they can. You've probably done the same over the course of the year. If so, continue reading for information for helping your students submit the best of their writing and artwork to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.

     

     

    Submitting Student Work

    Not every piece of student art or writing will be at the level of submitting. As a teacher, I help and encourage students to improve their work on a continual basis. My students often have the attitude that their first response to an assignment is the best. This is often far from the truth. I try and teach them that they need to complete several revisions of an essay before submitting. For a piece of art, I tell them to take their time and think through things before sculpting, painting, or drawing.

    If you have students that are planning to submit a piece of artwork or writing to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, direct them to the How to Submit Your Work section.

     

     

    Categories for Submission

    Students may submit work in 28 different categories. Each category has specific examples and special instructions. Be sure to direct your students to the list of categories for submission on the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards site.

     

     

    Awards and Scholarships

    The awards and scholarships provide a way for students to begin thinking about their future goals. They also provide students the means for going to a college of their choice. See the list of Alliance scholarships and special awards for more information.

     

    Publications and Recognition

    Everyone, especially students, want to be recognized for the work that they do. Three publications are published annually to recognize the work of the student award winners.

    • The Best Teen Writing: The Best Teen Writing is an anthology of the best writing by teens in America. Over 15,000 free copies are also distributed of The Best Teen Writing
    • SparkSpark showcases the best work by 7th and 8th grade students. 

    All three of these publications may be downloaded via the links above. 

    Students will be creative if we allow time in our day for assignments that foster creativity. When I teach novels, I allow students to express their knowledge of particular concepts through art and writing. Instead of creating a pointless assignment, students have a purpose, to create the best writing or artwork they can. You've probably done the same over the course of the year. If so, continue reading for information for helping your students submit the best of their writing and artwork to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.

     

     

    Submitting Student Work

    Not every piece of student art or writing will be at the level of submitting. As a teacher, I help and encourage students to improve their work on a continual basis. My students often have the attitude that their first response to an assignment is the best. This is often far from the truth. I try and teach them that they need to complete several revisions of an essay before submitting. For a piece of art, I tell them to take their time and think through things before sculpting, painting, or drawing.

    If you have students that are planning to submit a piece of artwork or writing to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, direct them to the How to Submit Your Work section.

     

     

    Categories for Submission

    Students may submit work in 28 different categories. Each category has specific examples and special instructions. Be sure to direct your students to the list of categories for submission on the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards site.

     

     

    Awards and Scholarships

    The awards and scholarships provide a way for students to begin thinking about their future goals. They also provide students the means for going to a college of their choice. See the list of Alliance scholarships and special awards for more information.

     

    Publications and Recognition

    Everyone, especially students, want to be recognized for the work that they do. Three publications are published annually to recognize the work of the student award winners.

    • The Best Teen Writing: The Best Teen Writing is an anthology of the best writing by teens in America. Over 15,000 free copies are also distributed of The Best Teen Writing
    • SparkSpark showcases the best work by 7th and 8th grade students. 

    All three of these publications may be downloaded via the links above. 

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