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March 13, 2012 I Do So Like Green Eggs and Ham! By Jeremy Brunaccioni
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    In early childhood education nothing compares to the words and rhymes of Dr. Seuss. Hop on Pop, The Foot Book, and Green Eggs and Ham are all classroom classics.  Their wealth of word play makes them invaluable teaching tools and enjoyable recreational reading. When you're done being inspired by the books below, view a fabulous assortment of sculptures and illustrations by Dr. Seuss at the R. Michelson Galleries.

     

     

    Dr. Seuss and a turtle sculpture.

     

    Dr. Seuss Books, New and Classic

     

    The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    This is a brand new title that’s worth adding to your collection. It features forgotten Dr. Seuss stories that originally appeared in magazines and includes an informative introduction by world-renowned Seuss expert Charles D. Cohen, chock-full of background info you can use in your classroom. "Gustav, the Goldfish," "The Strange Shirt Spot," and "Tadd and Todd" are just a few of the stories featured in this collection.

     

    And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    Featuring Marco, of McElligot’s Pool, and set on a street close to Dr. Seuss’ home in Springfield, Massachusetts, this is a longer Dr. Seuss book that can actually be read in one sitting. After seeing a horse and wagon go by, Marco eventually builds up in his imagination a crazy procession of people, vehicles, and animals. Try out my vocabulary writing prompt to extend the learning.

     

    If I Ran the Zoo

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    Children crack up upon hearing this funny tale of Gerald McGrew and his made up zoo animals. Who can resist creatures like a Lunk, Mulligatawny, or Thing-a-ma-Bobsk? This title is on the longer side and may be better read to youngsters in two parts. Download my picture frame worksheet that children can use to create their own animals.

     

    Scrambled Eggs Super!

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

    With this book, Green Eggs and Ham, and Horton Hatches the Egg, you can create a mini library if you're teaching an egg unit. Scrambled Eggs Super! follows the adventures of Peter T. Hooper as he collects eggs from all sorts of zany birds. My students seem to especially enjoy the word play in this book. Who wouldn't, with lines like, "For my Scrambled Eggs Super-dee-Dooper-dee-Booper Special de luxe a-la-Peter T. Hooper!"

    For more scrambled fun, check out my rhyming lesson plan or the Dr. Seuss Author Study collection.

     

    Green Eggs and Ham

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    This is one of the relatively quick and classic Dr. Seuss stories you probably remember from your own childhood. “I do not like them, Sam-I-am. I do not like green eggs and ham.” Does that ring a bell? The repetition of text, rhymes, and humorous illustrations make this a good match for young students. Try my Green Eggs and Ham word sort as a rhyming extension activity or print out two sets for a game of concentration.

     

    Dr. Seuss Activity

    For this activity, you'll either need some color copies of your favorite Seuss characters or some Internet printouts. If you use the Internet, it's easiest to use Google images to find your Dr. Seuss illustrations. Once you have printed and cut them out, use clear, wide packing tape to stick them to blocks from your blocks center. Voilà! You have simple Dr. Seuss action figures that your students can use for some imaginative play or to retell stories.

    Who can resist Thing 1 and Thing 2?

    Imagining a Seussian world in the blocks center.

    You don't have to stop with Dr. Seuss. Consider the units you cover and how you might adapt some blocks. I've done a number of blocks that display famous architecture. The block below, for instance, features a primary source drawing depicting the White House.

     

    The White House block.

    In early childhood education nothing compares to the words and rhymes of Dr. Seuss. Hop on Pop, The Foot Book, and Green Eggs and Ham are all classroom classics.  Their wealth of word play makes them invaluable teaching tools and enjoyable recreational reading. When you're done being inspired by the books below, view a fabulous assortment of sculptures and illustrations by Dr. Seuss at the R. Michelson Galleries.

     

     

    Dr. Seuss and a turtle sculpture.

     

    Dr. Seuss Books, New and Classic

     

    The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    This is a brand new title that’s worth adding to your collection. It features forgotten Dr. Seuss stories that originally appeared in magazines and includes an informative introduction by world-renowned Seuss expert Charles D. Cohen, chock-full of background info you can use in your classroom. "Gustav, the Goldfish," "The Strange Shirt Spot," and "Tadd and Todd" are just a few of the stories featured in this collection.

     

    And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    Featuring Marco, of McElligot’s Pool, and set on a street close to Dr. Seuss’ home in Springfield, Massachusetts, this is a longer Dr. Seuss book that can actually be read in one sitting. After seeing a horse and wagon go by, Marco eventually builds up in his imagination a crazy procession of people, vehicles, and animals. Try out my vocabulary writing prompt to extend the learning.

     

    If I Ran the Zoo

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    Children crack up upon hearing this funny tale of Gerald McGrew and his made up zoo animals. Who can resist creatures like a Lunk, Mulligatawny, or Thing-a-ma-Bobsk? This title is on the longer side and may be better read to youngsters in two parts. Download my picture frame worksheet that children can use to create their own animals.

     

    Scrambled Eggs Super!

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

    With this book, Green Eggs and Ham, and Horton Hatches the Egg, you can create a mini library if you're teaching an egg unit. Scrambled Eggs Super! follows the adventures of Peter T. Hooper as he collects eggs from all sorts of zany birds. My students seem to especially enjoy the word play in this book. Who wouldn't, with lines like, "For my Scrambled Eggs Super-dee-Dooper-dee-Booper Special de luxe a-la-Peter T. Hooper!"

    For more scrambled fun, check out my rhyming lesson plan or the Dr. Seuss Author Study collection.

     

    Green Eggs and Ham

    Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss

    Random House

     

    This is one of the relatively quick and classic Dr. Seuss stories you probably remember from your own childhood. “I do not like them, Sam-I-am. I do not like green eggs and ham.” Does that ring a bell? The repetition of text, rhymes, and humorous illustrations make this a good match for young students. Try my Green Eggs and Ham word sort as a rhyming extension activity or print out two sets for a game of concentration.

     

    Dr. Seuss Activity

    For this activity, you'll either need some color copies of your favorite Seuss characters or some Internet printouts. If you use the Internet, it's easiest to use Google images to find your Dr. Seuss illustrations. Once you have printed and cut them out, use clear, wide packing tape to stick them to blocks from your blocks center. Voilà! You have simple Dr. Seuss action figures that your students can use for some imaginative play or to retell stories.

    Who can resist Thing 1 and Thing 2?

    Imagining a Seussian world in the blocks center.

    You don't have to stop with Dr. Seuss. Consider the units you cover and how you might adapt some blocks. I've done a number of blocks that display famous architecture. The block below, for instance, features a primary source drawing depicting the White House.

     

    The White House block.

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