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April 1, 2015

11 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

By Genia Connell
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5

    Walk into any discount, drug, or grocery store at this time of year and you are sure to see displays filled with cellophane bags of colorful educational resources — all disguised as Easter eggs! Sure, the manufacturer's intent may have been for customers to use these hollow plastic eggs to fill children's baskets with hidden surprises, but if you think outside the "basket," you'll see all the great ways you can use them in your classroom. This week, I'm hoppy (sorry, couldn't help myself!) to share with you 11 ways to reuse those plastic eggs long after the bunny has left the building.

     

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Word Families

    Spin the wheel and make words with different beginning, ending, and middle sounds. Students can record the words they find on paper. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Word Pairings

    Use eggs to help students find better choices for overused words such as said, or to practice matching antonyms, synonyms, and homophones.

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Number Matches

    Young students can match words, numbers, tallies, Roman numerals, or any other representations of numbers. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Time Matching

    Students can match analog to digital time or before and after phrases with the correct digital or analog time. Read more about this activity in "10 Quick, Easy (and Fun!) Ways to Practice Time Skills."

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Basic Facts

    I love these eggs with the extra band in the middle. I'm convinced they were invented for teachers and activities like this. Students can use these to practice basic facts independently, with partners, or as part of a center activity.

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Eggcellent Reading Responses

    For a change of pace from our normal reading response activities, students think it's fun to store mini-reading responses inside these plastic eggs the week before spring break. A couple times a week when I take the responses out to check, I leave a little treat behind.  

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Story Starters

    Put story stems inside the eggs. Have students select an egg and complete a story based on the story starter they found in their chosen egg. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Rewards

    Write student rewards on small slips of paper and place inside eggs. When students earn a reward, let them pick an egg to discover what their hidden surprise is. 

    Scavenger Hunt

    Make spring cleaning fun by hiding jobs inside each egg. Students hunt for eggs and perform the cleaning task they find inside their egg. When the job is done, I let my students choose a small egg with a treat inside. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Partnering

    Separate the two halves of the eggs and put them in a container for children to reach in and randomly draw one half. Partners are discovered when the two halves are put together.  

    For groups, combine sets of partners who get the same color egg. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Planters

    Use the eggs as mini-planters for a science unit or even a Mother's Day gift! You can make easy stands for the eggs with a strip of construction paper taped to form a collar.

    I'd love to know if you have any unusual uses for usual items like plastic eggs. If you do, please share in the comment section below! 

     

     

     

    Walk into any discount, drug, or grocery store at this time of year and you are sure to see displays filled with cellophane bags of colorful educational resources — all disguised as Easter eggs! Sure, the manufacturer's intent may have been for customers to use these hollow plastic eggs to fill children's baskets with hidden surprises, but if you think outside the "basket," you'll see all the great ways you can use them in your classroom. This week, I'm hoppy (sorry, couldn't help myself!) to share with you 11 ways to reuse those plastic eggs long after the bunny has left the building.

     

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Word Families

    Spin the wheel and make words with different beginning, ending, and middle sounds. Students can record the words they find on paper. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Word Pairings

    Use eggs to help students find better choices for overused words such as said, or to practice matching antonyms, synonyms, and homophones.

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Number Matches

    Young students can match words, numbers, tallies, Roman numerals, or any other representations of numbers. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Time Matching

    Students can match analog to digital time or before and after phrases with the correct digital or analog time. Read more about this activity in "10 Quick, Easy (and Fun!) Ways to Practice Time Skills."

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Basic Facts

    I love these eggs with the extra band in the middle. I'm convinced they were invented for teachers and activities like this. Students can use these to practice basic facts independently, with partners, or as part of a center activity.

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Eggcellent Reading Responses

    For a change of pace from our normal reading response activities, students think it's fun to store mini-reading responses inside these plastic eggs the week before spring break. A couple times a week when I take the responses out to check, I leave a little treat behind.  

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Story Starters

    Put story stems inside the eggs. Have students select an egg and complete a story based on the story starter they found in their chosen egg. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Rewards

    Write student rewards on small slips of paper and place inside eggs. When students earn a reward, let them pick an egg to discover what their hidden surprise is. 

    Scavenger Hunt

    Make spring cleaning fun by hiding jobs inside each egg. Students hunt for eggs and perform the cleaning task they find inside their egg. When the job is done, I let my students choose a small egg with a treat inside. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Partnering

    Separate the two halves of the eggs and put them in a container for children to reach in and randomly draw one half. Partners are discovered when the two halves are put together.  

    For groups, combine sets of partners who get the same color egg. 

    10 Creative Uses for Plastic Eggs in the Classroom

    Planters

    Use the eggs as mini-planters for a science unit or even a Mother's Day gift! You can make easy stands for the eggs with a strip of construction paper taped to form a collar.

    I'd love to know if you have any unusual uses for usual items like plastic eggs. If you do, please share in the comment section below! 

     

     

     

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