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April 1, 2010

Census Day: April 1

By Eric Antuna
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Today is Census Day (April 1st) and also April Fool's Day — go have fun! Census Day is used as "a point of reference for sending your completed forms back." See 2010.census.gov. You can find lots of different activities to use in your classroom here at Scholastic.com/census as well as www.census.gov/schools. I've briefly outlined a few ideas from these sites that I will use in my classroom when I go back on track.

    http://www.scholastic.com/census/

    Scholastic census

    I loved going to this page! It shows the different locations that the United States has a direct influence on. If you click on the "United States" icon, you'll see there's a huge collection of materials for you to use in your classroom.  

    The Census Week activities that can be done in 15 minutes caught my eye! There's ideas for role playing, making posters, and my personal favorite: the friendly letter.

    You may be interested in organizing a school census week in which you would organize an all school event. If you need ideas on where to start, please check out these activities and lesson plans on Scholastic.

    For those of you that did not receive a booklet from Scholastic about working with the census in your classroom, there are great lesson plan materials for teachers to use in their classrooms. The activities are conveniently organized by grade level and into topics about the origins of the census, community, mapping and data collection. 

    Photo

    Here is a quick overview of the K-2 lessons (there are more grade specific levels on the site as well):

    Lesson 1: It's About Us - an introduction to the census overall.

    Lesson 2: Mapping Our Home - learning about the community and it's relationships.

    Lesson 3: Then and Now - refining map skills.

    Lesson 4: A Class Census - students collect and organize data.

     

    http://www.census.gov/schools/

    Government census

    There is a huge amount of resources if you click on the teachers' link. You'll find fabulous maps and the same lessons found on Scholastic's webpage. There's also the ELL/ESL program guide for your students that are still learning English.

    There is also a fabulous interactive games/activity tool for you to have students explore.  

    Activities for kids

    Do you have any ideas to make the census more meaningful for your students? Please share them here! 

    Thanks for reading!

    Eric

     

    Today is Census Day (April 1st) and also April Fool's Day — go have fun! Census Day is used as "a point of reference for sending your completed forms back." See 2010.census.gov. You can find lots of different activities to use in your classroom here at Scholastic.com/census as well as www.census.gov/schools. I've briefly outlined a few ideas from these sites that I will use in my classroom when I go back on track.

    http://www.scholastic.com/census/

    Scholastic census

    I loved going to this page! It shows the different locations that the United States has a direct influence on. If you click on the "United States" icon, you'll see there's a huge collection of materials for you to use in your classroom.  

    The Census Week activities that can be done in 15 minutes caught my eye! There's ideas for role playing, making posters, and my personal favorite: the friendly letter.

    You may be interested in organizing a school census week in which you would organize an all school event. If you need ideas on where to start, please check out these activities and lesson plans on Scholastic.

    For those of you that did not receive a booklet from Scholastic about working with the census in your classroom, there are great lesson plan materials for teachers to use in their classrooms. The activities are conveniently organized by grade level and into topics about the origins of the census, community, mapping and data collection. 

    Photo

    Here is a quick overview of the K-2 lessons (there are more grade specific levels on the site as well):

    Lesson 1: It's About Us - an introduction to the census overall.

    Lesson 2: Mapping Our Home - learning about the community and it's relationships.

    Lesson 3: Then and Now - refining map skills.

    Lesson 4: A Class Census - students collect and organize data.

     

    http://www.census.gov/schools/

    Government census

    There is a huge amount of resources if you click on the teachers' link. You'll find fabulous maps and the same lessons found on Scholastic's webpage. There's also the ELL/ESL program guide for your students that are still learning English.

    There is also a fabulous interactive games/activity tool for you to have students explore.  

    Activities for kids

    Do you have any ideas to make the census more meaningful for your students? Please share them here! 

    Thanks for reading!

    Eric

     

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