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January 6, 2015

Teach Code in 2015

By Christy Crawford
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–12

    Use your role as a teacher to expose the youngest students to America's hottest career path. Watch the short video to learn why.
     


    Resolve to teach just a little code before the last day of school because:

     

    1. You don't even need a computer!

    Code.org uses "unplugged" tutorials that teach the basics of computer science without a digital device. Users can also learn the basics with smartphones (BYOD!) or complete the coding puzzles as a group on a SmartBoard. You could also use 12 laptops as students work in pairs. Check out my post "10 Terrific Ways to Use One iPad or iPhone in the Classroom" for more. 

     

     

    2. Help is available

    Code.org offers fun workshops, with resource giveaways, for teachers of students from kindergarten through fifth grade. (In these FREE professional development sessions, frank and honest discussion is encouraged, free food is offered, and games are played all day!) If you can't make a workshop, check out the short user-friendly video tutorials on the site, their K-5 Support Forum, or sign up for Code.org's "office hours," monthly one-hour video chats for assistance with Code.org curriculum.

     

    3. We can't get enough of Frozen!

    Code.org visitors can make Elsa and Anna of Arendelle create intricate snowflakes with a little math and blockly (beginner code), help an Angry Bird get the pig, or code their ownFlappy Birdgame to play on a smartphone or any digital device. The site has something exciting for everyone from ages 4 to 104.

    Want more easy coding activities? Check out Made with Code.com, Google's $50 million dollar initiative to get girls interested in coding. My students — girls and boys alike — LOVE Made With Code!

     

    4. You can help a kid find his or her passion

    Use your influence for just one hour (try a math or science period) between now and the end of the school year to make even the youngest kids creators of technology, rather than just consumers! Once you make that initial introduction to students, many of them will be hooked and looking for ways to explore computer science outside of the classroom. Tell students about organizations like Coder Dojo, Black Girls Code, and Girls Who Code, which offer free computer programming lessons after school, on weekends or during the summer.

    Use your role as a teacher to expose the youngest students to America's hottest career path. Watch the short video to learn why.
     


    Resolve to teach just a little code before the last day of school because:

     

    1. You don't even need a computer!

    Code.org uses "unplugged" tutorials that teach the basics of computer science without a digital device. Users can also learn the basics with smartphones (BYOD!) or complete the coding puzzles as a group on a SmartBoard. You could also use 12 laptops as students work in pairs. Check out my post "10 Terrific Ways to Use One iPad or iPhone in the Classroom" for more. 

     

     

    2. Help is available

    Code.org offers fun workshops, with resource giveaways, for teachers of students from kindergarten through fifth grade. (In these FREE professional development sessions, frank and honest discussion is encouraged, free food is offered, and games are played all day!) If you can't make a workshop, check out the short user-friendly video tutorials on the site, their K-5 Support Forum, or sign up for Code.org's "office hours," monthly one-hour video chats for assistance with Code.org curriculum.

     

    3. We can't get enough of Frozen!

    Code.org visitors can make Elsa and Anna of Arendelle create intricate snowflakes with a little math and blockly (beginner code), help an Angry Bird get the pig, or code their ownFlappy Birdgame to play on a smartphone or any digital device. The site has something exciting for everyone from ages 4 to 104.

    Want more easy coding activities? Check out Made with Code.com, Google's $50 million dollar initiative to get girls interested in coding. My students — girls and boys alike — LOVE Made With Code!

     

    4. You can help a kid find his or her passion

    Use your influence for just one hour (try a math or science period) between now and the end of the school year to make even the youngest kids creators of technology, rather than just consumers! Once you make that initial introduction to students, many of them will be hooked and looking for ways to explore computer science outside of the classroom. Tell students about organizations like Coder Dojo, Black Girls Code, and Girls Who Code, which offer free computer programming lessons after school, on weekends or during the summer.

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