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May 16, 2017

Fast and Fun Resources for Hidden Figures

By Christy Crawford
Grades 3–5, 6–8

    If you'™re a STEM-loving teacher, you'™re probably obsessed with stories of the NASA women who put a man on the moon. You probably watched the film and read the book, Hidden Figures, about three of these brilliant women. Hidden Figures is an excellent way to excite your students about STEM topics during Black History Month, Women's History Month, or any time of year, so try out these Hidden Figures teaching resources give students the opportunity to dissect great scenes and passages again and again.  

     

    Plus, check out more of Our Favorite Courageous Women Biographies.

     

    1. A Teacher's Guide To The Book

    Read Margot Lee Shetterly'™s book Hidden Figures, then grab this Teacher's Guide to make planning easier.

    2. Scholastic'™s Moon Math

    Have kids feel like they are part of the action. Read about mathematician Katherine Johnson, then complete a diagram of the moon lander'™s flight plan and calculate angles.

     

    Interested in more STEM ideas? Check out these 37 Books About Inventors and Inventions.

     

    3. Learn More About the Moon and Space

    Encourage students to delve deeper into the science topics the book explored. You may give them books to teach them about the phases of moon or the moon landing, widen their understanding of space with these nonfiction books, or even pique their interest with books about the past and future of space travel.

    4. Get Quotes Straight From The Author

    Blacks or females at NASA were nothing new for author Shetterly. She writes, "As a child, however, I knew so many African-Americans working in science, math, and engineering that I thought that'™s just what black folks did." Encourage students to research Margot Lee Shetterly's history with the subject as they examine her purpose in writing the book. 

    5. School-Friendly Trailers

      

    Waiting for school funds to kick in so you can purchase the DVD? Inspire young mathematicians with movie trailers before assignments like Scholastic'™s Moon Math or a Hidden Figures writing reflection. Tease kids with trailers that are easy to access and reward young technologists with astronaut ice cream. Ice cream, even freeze-dried, makes any assignment better.

    6. Guide Students Through Movie Discussions

    After watching the movie, ask your students questions such as "œWhere have you seen someone be first in their community? "How can you be first in your community?" "What opportunities are  available for you to stand up for others?,"  to spark substantive discussion. You can even turn them into great prompts for student writing reflections or discussion starters for Hidden Figures book clubs.

    7. Fact or Historical Fiction?

    Compare the book to the movie. Have your students research to find out juicy facts such as who really removed an infamous wall sign; which characters were composites of NASA employees and why.

     

    If you'™re a STEM-loving teacher, you'™re probably obsessed with stories of the NASA women who put a man on the moon. You probably watched the film and read the book, Hidden Figures, about three of these brilliant women. Hidden Figures is an excellent way to excite your students about STEM topics during Black History Month, Women's History Month, or any time of year, so try out these Hidden Figures teaching resources give students the opportunity to dissect great scenes and passages again and again.  

     

    Plus, check out more of Our Favorite Courageous Women Biographies.

     

    1. A Teacher's Guide To The Book

    Read Margot Lee Shetterly'™s book Hidden Figures, then grab this Teacher's Guide to make planning easier.

    2. Scholastic'™s Moon Math

    Have kids feel like they are part of the action. Read about mathematician Katherine Johnson, then complete a diagram of the moon lander'™s flight plan and calculate angles.

     

    Interested in more STEM ideas? Check out these 37 Books About Inventors and Inventions.

     

    3. Learn More About the Moon and Space

    Encourage students to delve deeper into the science topics the book explored. You may give them books to teach them about the phases of moon or the moon landing, widen their understanding of space with these nonfiction books, or even pique their interest with books about the past and future of space travel.

    4. Get Quotes Straight From The Author

    Blacks or females at NASA were nothing new for author Shetterly. She writes, "As a child, however, I knew so many African-Americans working in science, math, and engineering that I thought that'™s just what black folks did." Encourage students to research Margot Lee Shetterly's history with the subject as they examine her purpose in writing the book. 

    5. School-Friendly Trailers

      

    Waiting for school funds to kick in so you can purchase the DVD? Inspire young mathematicians with movie trailers before assignments like Scholastic'™s Moon Math or a Hidden Figures writing reflection. Tease kids with trailers that are easy to access and reward young technologists with astronaut ice cream. Ice cream, even freeze-dried, makes any assignment better.

    6. Guide Students Through Movie Discussions

    After watching the movie, ask your students questions such as "œWhere have you seen someone be first in their community? "How can you be first in your community?" "What opportunities are  available for you to stand up for others?,"  to spark substantive discussion. You can even turn them into great prompts for student writing reflections or discussion starters for Hidden Figures book clubs.

    7. Fact or Historical Fiction?

    Compare the book to the movie. Have your students research to find out juicy facts such as who really removed an infamous wall sign; which characters were composites of NASA employees and why.

     

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