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March 1, 2016 Engaging and Educational Egg Hunt Ideas By Brian Smith
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Spring will be here before we know it. As the flowers begin to bloom, egg hunts are a great tradition in many places. Using one or more of the following ideas for your class egg hunt takes a little planning but will make your egg hunt engaging and unforgettably fun.

     

    1. Sequencing

    I have to start with my favorite educational egg hunt. It’s a great exercise in sequencing. The first year that I came up with this idea, I sent a note home asking parents to help me collect plastic eggs. I asked them to send in 24 of any type of plastic eggs that they ran across. (Of course, this was never a requirement for any student.) Parents sent in sports themed eggs, animal print eggs, crazy face eggs, camouflage eggs, and many, many more. As eggs break, I go out and buy replacements. Spending a few bucks each year to replace one group of eggs is a lot easier when parents have helped get the egg collection started.

    STEPS

    Funny Face Eggs

    • Divide all the eggs into groups (e.g. sports eggs, face eggs, etc.).

    • Count out one egg from each group for each student. The rest of the eggs that I’m not using go into my egg storage container so I don’t hide more eggs than I need.

     

     

     

    Sequence Sheet

     

    • Take a picture of each type of egg and create different sequence sheets.

    • Create several different sequence sheets so that only a few kids have the same sequence. If you want to be ambitious you can create a different sequence for each child.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Taren at the egg hunt

     

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Distribute the sequence sheets and explain each egg.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids have a great time following their sequence.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2. Math

    Do you have a ton of plain plastic eggs? If so, take a math objective that you are working on and write problems on the eggs. Don’t want to focus on one skill? Use this as a spiral activity and put different types of problems on the eggs.

    STEPS

    math egg

     

    • Decide how many eggs each student will look for and separate that number of eggs out.

    • Decide on a math skill or skills to cover with your egg hunt.

    • Write the problems on the eggs.

     

     

     

     

     

    Kaedyn Egg Hunting

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Give each student a sheet of paper on which to complete their egg problems after they have collected all of the eggs.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids collect their eggs.

    • Each kid solves the problems on their eggs.

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Word Families

    Fellow blogger and friend, Genia Connell, gives 11 suggestions for how to use plastic eggs in your classroom. When I saw her idea for writing word families on eggs I knew that would make my egg hunts even more educational.

    STEPS
     

    word family egg

    • Decide how many eggs each student will look for and separate that number out.

    • Write the onsets (the beginning sounds) around the longer portion of the egg.

    • Write the rhyme (the word family) once on the shorter portion of the egg.

     

     

     

    jaymie happy after hunt

     

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Give each student a sheet of paper on which to write all the words in their word families after they have collected all the eggs.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids collect their eggs.

    • Each kid writes the word families on their paper.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Other Tips

    • For the word family egg hunt you may want to use the steps of the sequence egg hunt so that each student finds all the different word families.

    • Allow students to bring in their favorite basket for the egg hunt.

    • Have a few extra baskets or bags on hand for kids who forget or are unable to bring in a basket.

    • After setting clear boundaries for the egg hunt, ask students in an older class or parents to hide the eggs for you.

    Connect with me, dad2ella, on Twitter and Pinterest.

    I can’t wait to see you next time.

    Spring will be here before we know it. As the flowers begin to bloom, egg hunts are a great tradition in many places. Using one or more of the following ideas for your class egg hunt takes a little planning but will make your egg hunt engaging and unforgettably fun.

     

    1. Sequencing

    I have to start with my favorite educational egg hunt. It’s a great exercise in sequencing. The first year that I came up with this idea, I sent a note home asking parents to help me collect plastic eggs. I asked them to send in 24 of any type of plastic eggs that they ran across. (Of course, this was never a requirement for any student.) Parents sent in sports themed eggs, animal print eggs, crazy face eggs, camouflage eggs, and many, many more. As eggs break, I go out and buy replacements. Spending a few bucks each year to replace one group of eggs is a lot easier when parents have helped get the egg collection started.

    STEPS

    Funny Face Eggs

    • Divide all the eggs into groups (e.g. sports eggs, face eggs, etc.).

    • Count out one egg from each group for each student. The rest of the eggs that I’m not using go into my egg storage container so I don’t hide more eggs than I need.

     

     

     

    Sequence Sheet

     

    • Take a picture of each type of egg and create different sequence sheets.

    • Create several different sequence sheets so that only a few kids have the same sequence. If you want to be ambitious you can create a different sequence for each child.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Taren at the egg hunt

     

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Distribute the sequence sheets and explain each egg.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids have a great time following their sequence.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2. Math

    Do you have a ton of plain plastic eggs? If so, take a math objective that you are working on and write problems on the eggs. Don’t want to focus on one skill? Use this as a spiral activity and put different types of problems on the eggs.

    STEPS

    math egg

     

    • Decide how many eggs each student will look for and separate that number of eggs out.

    • Decide on a math skill or skills to cover with your egg hunt.

    • Write the problems on the eggs.

     

     

     

     

     

    Kaedyn Egg Hunting

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Give each student a sheet of paper on which to complete their egg problems after they have collected all of the eggs.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids collect their eggs.

    • Each kid solves the problems on their eggs.

     

     

     

     

     

    3. Word Families

    Fellow blogger and friend, Genia Connell, gives 11 suggestions for how to use plastic eggs in your classroom. When I saw her idea for writing word families on eggs I knew that would make my egg hunts even more educational.

    STEPS
     

    word family egg

    • Decide how many eggs each student will look for and separate that number out.

    • Write the onsets (the beginning sounds) around the longer portion of the egg.

    • Write the rhyme (the word family) once on the shorter portion of the egg.

     

     

     

    jaymie happy after hunt

     

    • Hide the eggs.

    • Give each student a sheet of paper on which to write all the words in their word families after they have collected all the eggs.

    • Say "Go!" and watch the kids collect their eggs.

    • Each kid writes the word families on their paper.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Other Tips

    • For the word family egg hunt you may want to use the steps of the sequence egg hunt so that each student finds all the different word families.

    • Allow students to bring in their favorite basket for the egg hunt.

    • Have a few extra baskets or bags on hand for kids who forget or are unable to bring in a basket.

    • After setting clear boundaries for the egg hunt, ask students in an older class or parents to hide the eggs for you.

    Connect with me, dad2ella, on Twitter and Pinterest.

    I can’t wait to see you next time.

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