Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
September 8, 2014 Celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day in Your Classroom By Brian Smith
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5

    Ahoy there matey! This here be a haven for me hearties who been marooned in a classroom and searching for the lost land of fun. If that be you, then ye be lucky mate, because Talk Like a Pirate Day is September 19 and it be the perfect time to polish off yer eye patch, strap on the old peg leg, and have some fun with yer crew!

    Loose translation for all the non-pirate speakers out there: Hello friend. This blog is a safe place for all the teachers out there who want to have some fun. If you have been missing the fun of teaching, then you are lucky because Talk Like a Pirate Day is September 19. Get out your best pirate costume and have some fun with your kids with these activities!

     

    Books for the Day

    How I Became a Pirate CoverHow I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long and illustrated by David Shannon

    Start your day off with this fantastic, modern-day tale of how Jeremy Jacobs goes from building a sandcastle on the beach to joining Captain Braid Beard’s pirate crew. Where will Braid Beard hide his treasure? Will Jeremy make it back home in time for soccer practice?

     

     

     

     

     

    Pirates Love Underpants CoverPirates Love Underpants by Claire Freedman and Ben Cort

    This is one in the Underpants series that includes Aliens Love Underpants and Dinosaurs Love Underpants. Do you know who else loves underpants? Most everyone under the age of eight. They love the word “underpants” and they love the sight of underpants in a book! This is the perfect book to pull out during the day when the crew is beginning to get restless and it feels like the whole ship may sink!

     

     

     

     

     

    Pirates Don't Change Diapers CoverPirates Don’t Change Diapers by Melinda Long and illustrated by David Shannon

    At the end of your day revisit Captain Braid Beard and Jeremy Jacobs in the hilarious sequel to How I Became a Pirate. The pirates return when the bow of their ship is broken and they need Jeremy to help them dig up their treasure. Only this time, Bonney Anne, Jeremy's baby sister, is along for the adventure. Will the crew ever learn how to put on a diaper and will they ever get their ship fixed?

     

     

     

    Activities for the Day

    Pirate MapI love how Talk Like a Pirate Day is in September because that means that places like Oriental Trading and Party City have pirate supplies out. There is no cuter sight than a class walking down the hallway and every one of them is wearing an eye patch and greeting people with a good hearty ARRRRRG!

    • Bury (hide) a treasure, like a bag of eye patches, and leave a treasure map where X marks the spot for your class to find and follow.

    • Use this Pirate Dictionary to make dictionaries for your students to fill out. Include as few or as many pages in your dictionary as you have time to complete during your day.

    • Jolly RogerMake sure that your class learns about women pirates. This is always a highlight because most students have never heard of a female being a pirate. When they learn about Anne Bonny and Mary Read, that is a fact they will never forget! When you read Pirates Don’t Change Diapers at the end of the day, make sure to point out that Jeremy Jacobs' little sister’s name is Bonney Anne! You can read about these pirates and then share what is appropriate for your class, even if it's just a picture and the fact that they are women pirates.

    • Give everyone a white sheet of paper and have them draw their own Jolly Roger (pirate flag) or themselves as a pirate. Who doesn’t want to see a self-portrait of a kindergartener with a hook or a second grader with a peg leg?

    • Message in a bottleCollect a small plastic soft drink bottle for each student and write a personalized note for each one. Put the note in the bottle and place it on their desk while they are out of the room at some point during the day.

    • Have each student come up with a pirate name. Make up your own rules or use this fun list.

    • The last suggestion that I have for Talk Like a Pirate Day is to have fun. Connect your activities to your curriculum, but make it fun.

    Lets connect it on Pinterest and Twitter.

    I can’t wait to see ye landlubbers next week!

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2