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February 20, 2017

Book Buzz: Pancake Day — Your New Favorite Holiday!

By Brian Smith
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    I love holidays. All holidays. Some are obviously more exciting than others but one of the most exciting holidays in my classroom is Pancake Day. This year it’s on Tuesday, February 28. 

    Believe it or not, National Pancake Day isn’t just a made-up holiday from some national or international pancake chain of restaurants. Pancake Day is also Fat Tuesday, Shrove Tuesday, or Mardi Gras. Pancake Day is actually the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, (which is the first day of Lent). It is the last day of feasting before giving up something for the 40 days leading up to Easter. Legend has it that families would clean out their pantries on Shrove Tuesday so that they weren’t tempted to break their vows of withdrawal during Lent. By cleaning out their pantry they had all of the ingredients to make pancakes and so the nickname of Pancake Day was created. 

    Books

    I have been collecting books to read to my class on Pancake Day for years but my new favorite is by fantastic author of Pirasaurs!, Josh Funk. It’s Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast.  This is the book that I have been waiting for my whole life as I am huge fan of breakfast (my family often has breakfast for dinner!)! I love this book for lots of reasons and not just because of its sweet breakfast main characters. I love that the setting is inside the refrigerator. I love that it’s a rhyming book and I love all of the fun adventures that the two main characters have as they race towards the end of the story only to find . . . Baron von Waffle! You will love this book. Your students will love this book. Get this book.

     

    Eric Carle also has a book for Pancake Day called Pancakes, Pancakes.  Right now it’s only $1 at the Scholastic Store. Order a class set to help them remember all the fun they had becoming Pancakeologists. This book also follows the steps of making a pancake so it’s a great companion to Pancakes for Breakfast (see more below). Reading this book first will give your class all of the language that they need to book talk their way through the next book.

     

                

    Another book that I love is Pancakes for Breakfast by Tomie dePaola. I have always loved a good wordless picture book and this is one of the great ones. It is such a great book to talk with kids about not only what ingredients you need to make pancakes, but about sequencing. Don’t forget to check out this great worksheet. It makes a great morning work activity.

     

    Tyler Makes Pancakes by Tyler Florence and Craig Frazier is a fun story! If you have read to your class all the books above, by the time you get to this one, your students will be able to help the grocer explain to Tyler where all the ingredients for his blueberry pancakes come from. This book will serve as a great way for your kids to rehearse sequence.

     

    Finally, If You Give a Pig a Pancake by Laura Numeroff is a fun way to keep talking about sequencing and have a few laughs at the same time. It’s a great book to read right before your kids board their buses to help them remember what a great pancake experience they had that day.

     

    Activities

    Colorful Pancakes

    Kids love this recipe. They look forward to it, and it’s definitely a countdown-worthy activity that you can use as a classroom reward.

    Supplies needed:

    • A griddle
    • Pancake mix (I prefer to use the just add water Bisquick bottle because I typically make my pancakes while my class is at their special (PE, music, computer lab) 
    • Food coloring

    Step one: Have each student choose a color of the pancake that they would like to experience.

    Step two: Have each student draw their pancake and finish the sentence on the Pancakes for Breakfast Sheet above. This is the second time that my class will fill out this sheet but with two different objectives. The first is their morning work and they can draw bacon, grits, livermush, eggs, or a grapefruit (if they are an old soul). The second time is for this activity. This sheet helps me remember who ordered what color pancake later while they are in their special and I’m serving as the short order cook. The sentence also must have the word “pancake” written on the line along with a descriptive color word.

    Step three: Make the pancakes.

    Step four: Serve the pancakes.

    Step five: Watch the kids’ faces as they eat a green, blue, or red pancake.

     

    Pancake Art

    I love this art project. Kids will create a 3-D stack of pancakes in four steps.

    Supplies needed for each child:

    • White piece of paper with a photocopied table setting printed on it
    • 3 different sized light brown circles 
    • 4 small pieces of cardboard
    • Glue stick
    • 1 yellow square smaller than the smallest circle
    • Chocolate brown paint

     

    Step one: Take a white place setting, one of each of the three different sized circles, and four cardboard squares.

       

     

    Step two: Glue the largest circle on the plate. Glue two cardboard squares in the center of the brown circle. Glue the second largest circle on top of the cardboard squares. Glue the last two cardboard squares on top of the second circle and then glue the smallest circle on top.

      

    Step three: Glue a yellow square on the top (it’s the butter)

    Step four: Paint on the brown paint starting at the top and painting down each layer of pancake. Let it lay flat until the paint is dry.

     

    Pancakeologist Certificate

    Supplies needed for each child:

    • Pancakeologist certificate

    Step one: Print this certificate for each of your students. Fill out and distribute.

     

    Connect with me, dad2ella, on Pinterest and Twitter.

    I can’t wait to see you next time.

     

    I love holidays. All holidays. Some are obviously more exciting than others but one of the most exciting holidays in my classroom is Pancake Day. This year it’s on Tuesday, February 28. 

    Believe it or not, National Pancake Day isn’t just a made-up holiday from some national or international pancake chain of restaurants. Pancake Day is also Fat Tuesday, Shrove Tuesday, or Mardi Gras. Pancake Day is actually the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, (which is the first day of Lent). It is the last day of feasting before giving up something for the 40 days leading up to Easter. Legend has it that families would clean out their pantries on Shrove Tuesday so that they weren’t tempted to break their vows of withdrawal during Lent. By cleaning out their pantry they had all of the ingredients to make pancakes and so the nickname of Pancake Day was created. 

    Books

    I have been collecting books to read to my class on Pancake Day for years but my new favorite is by fantastic author of Pirasaurs!, Josh Funk. It’s Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast.  This is the book that I have been waiting for my whole life as I am huge fan of breakfast (my family often has breakfast for dinner!)! I love this book for lots of reasons and not just because of its sweet breakfast main characters. I love that the setting is inside the refrigerator. I love that it’s a rhyming book and I love all of the fun adventures that the two main characters have as they race towards the end of the story only to find . . . Baron von Waffle! You will love this book. Your students will love this book. Get this book.

     

    Eric Carle also has a book for Pancake Day called Pancakes, Pancakes.  Right now it’s only $1 at the Scholastic Store. Order a class set to help them remember all the fun they had becoming Pancakeologists. This book also follows the steps of making a pancake so it’s a great companion to Pancakes for Breakfast (see more below). Reading this book first will give your class all of the language that they need to book talk their way through the next book.

     

                

    Another book that I love is Pancakes for Breakfast by Tomie dePaola. I have always loved a good wordless picture book and this is one of the great ones. It is such a great book to talk with kids about not only what ingredients you need to make pancakes, but about sequencing. Don’t forget to check out this great worksheet. It makes a great morning work activity.

     

    Tyler Makes Pancakes by Tyler Florence and Craig Frazier is a fun story! If you have read to your class all the books above, by the time you get to this one, your students will be able to help the grocer explain to Tyler where all the ingredients for his blueberry pancakes come from. This book will serve as a great way for your kids to rehearse sequence.

     

    Finally, If You Give a Pig a Pancake by Laura Numeroff is a fun way to keep talking about sequencing and have a few laughs at the same time. It’s a great book to read right before your kids board their buses to help them remember what a great pancake experience they had that day.

     

    Activities

    Colorful Pancakes

    Kids love this recipe. They look forward to it, and it’s definitely a countdown-worthy activity that you can use as a classroom reward.

    Supplies needed:

    • A griddle
    • Pancake mix (I prefer to use the just add water Bisquick bottle because I typically make my pancakes while my class is at their special (PE, music, computer lab) 
    • Food coloring

    Step one: Have each student choose a color of the pancake that they would like to experience.

    Step two: Have each student draw their pancake and finish the sentence on the Pancakes for Breakfast Sheet above. This is the second time that my class will fill out this sheet but with two different objectives. The first is their morning work and they can draw bacon, grits, livermush, eggs, or a grapefruit (if they are an old soul). The second time is for this activity. This sheet helps me remember who ordered what color pancake later while they are in their special and I’m serving as the short order cook. The sentence also must have the word “pancake” written on the line along with a descriptive color word.

    Step three: Make the pancakes.

    Step four: Serve the pancakes.

    Step five: Watch the kids’ faces as they eat a green, blue, or red pancake.

     

    Pancake Art

    I love this art project. Kids will create a 3-D stack of pancakes in four steps.

    Supplies needed for each child:

    • White piece of paper with a photocopied table setting printed on it
    • 3 different sized light brown circles 
    • 4 small pieces of cardboard
    • Glue stick
    • 1 yellow square smaller than the smallest circle
    • Chocolate brown paint

     

    Step one: Take a white place setting, one of each of the three different sized circles, and four cardboard squares.

       

     

    Step two: Glue the largest circle on the plate. Glue two cardboard squares in the center of the brown circle. Glue the second largest circle on top of the cardboard squares. Glue the last two cardboard squares on top of the second circle and then glue the smallest circle on top.

      

    Step three: Glue a yellow square on the top (it’s the butter)

    Step four: Paint on the brown paint starting at the top and painting down each layer of pancake. Let it lay flat until the paint is dry.

     

    Pancakeologist Certificate

    Supplies needed for each child:

    • Pancakeologist certificate

    Step one: Print this certificate for each of your students. Fill out and distribute.

     

    Connect with me, dad2ella, on Pinterest and Twitter.

    I can’t wait to see you next time.

     

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