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April 6, 2018

Graphic Stories for Little Readers

By Brian Smith
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    Graphic novels are a big deal in my house and in my classroom. My daughter Ella, a seventh grader, owns a bookshelf full of them and constantly rereads them. Some of her favorites are A Wrinkle in Time, The Lunch Lady series, El Deafo, and anything by her favorite author of all time, Raina Telgemeier. As a parent I am thrilled that she has a favorite author.

    I am also so happy that graphic novels are gaining popularity — and respect — as a unique form of literature with the ability to draw kids into reading. In my classroom, beginning and struggling readers can’t wait to come to the guided reading table. So, what is making my guided reading groups and my baggy book program so popular this year? First Little Comics! A series of sight word/high frequency books that are leveled from A–D. These sets come in individual packs of A–B, C–D, and small-group packaging for levels A–B and C–D.

    I recently discovered that there are levels E–F available and I can’t wait to get them into my classroom as my readers are growing through the levels like never before!

    These little books for little hands masterfully use the magic of the word bubbles to hook the reader into turning the page. Expanding reading skills into writing skills is super simple when you use word bubbles sheets. These sheets work for any book and can be used for books that are self-read or read to the striving reader/writer.


    Like the other books in the First Little Readers series, these have the Guided Reading level of each book on the cover. The First Little Comic expands the levels. For each level, they have included a few "plus" books. For example, there are two titles that are labeled B+. This helps those students who struggle with that leap from one whole level to the next. I also love the activity books that come with this series. Anything that I can use to help a child connect to a book is very welcome!

     

    Another reason to love these comics is that the classroom sets include a teaching guide! With single copy versions you get an activity book. Click on the book cover to peek inside.

    The future of graphic novels seems secure. Graphic novels such as El Deafo, Roller Girl, American Born Chinese, and This One Summer have been acknowledged by Newbery, Caldecott, and Printz award committees in recent years and the First Little Comics series seems to be an idea whose time has come. If you need a futher nudge in this direction, fellow blogger Rhonda Stewart has five solid pieces of advice for teachers wanting to introduce graphic novels into their classrooms.

    Check out my website, briansmithspeaks.com, and connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

    I can’t wait to see you next time!

    Graphic novels are a big deal in my house and in my classroom. My daughter Ella, a seventh grader, owns a bookshelf full of them and constantly rereads them. Some of her favorites are A Wrinkle in Time, The Lunch Lady series, El Deafo, and anything by her favorite author of all time, Raina Telgemeier. As a parent I am thrilled that she has a favorite author.

    I am also so happy that graphic novels are gaining popularity — and respect — as a unique form of literature with the ability to draw kids into reading. In my classroom, beginning and struggling readers can’t wait to come to the guided reading table. So, what is making my guided reading groups and my baggy book program so popular this year? First Little Comics! A series of sight word/high frequency books that are leveled from A–D. These sets come in individual packs of A–B, C–D, and small-group packaging for levels A–B and C–D.

    I recently discovered that there are levels E–F available and I can’t wait to get them into my classroom as my readers are growing through the levels like never before!

    These little books for little hands masterfully use the magic of the word bubbles to hook the reader into turning the page. Expanding reading skills into writing skills is super simple when you use word bubbles sheets. These sheets work for any book and can be used for books that are self-read or read to the striving reader/writer.


    Like the other books in the First Little Readers series, these have the Guided Reading level of each book on the cover. The First Little Comic expands the levels. For each level, they have included a few "plus" books. For example, there are two titles that are labeled B+. This helps those students who struggle with that leap from one whole level to the next. I also love the activity books that come with this series. Anything that I can use to help a child connect to a book is very welcome!

     

    Another reason to love these comics is that the classroom sets include a teaching guide! With single copy versions you get an activity book. Click on the book cover to peek inside.

    The future of graphic novels seems secure. Graphic novels such as El Deafo, Roller Girl, American Born Chinese, and This One Summer have been acknowledged by Newbery, Caldecott, and Printz award committees in recent years and the First Little Comics series seems to be an idea whose time has come. If you need a futher nudge in this direction, fellow blogger Rhonda Stewart has five solid pieces of advice for teachers wanting to introduce graphic novels into their classrooms.

    Check out my website, briansmithspeaks.com, and connect with me on Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest.

    I can’t wait to see you next time!

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Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
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