Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
December 19, 2011

Just Do It -- Apply for the Japan-U.S. Teacher Exchange Program

By Angela Bunyi
Grades 3–5

    In 2006, I was afforded an all-expenses paid adventure to Japan through the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund (JFMF). This included a three-week tour of Japanese schools, cultural expeditions, learning, and friendship. The only thing the program requested in exchange was that I share the knowledge I had gained upon returning to the United States. It truly was life-altering for me, and I will be eternally grateful for having had the opportunity.

    Sadly, because of economic struggles, the JFMF has dissolved. Luckily, a smaller program has been created and is entering its third active year. I would like to take a second to encourage you to apply for the Japan-U.S. Teacher Exchange Program for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). That may be a mouthful, but reviewing the process will not be a waste of your time.

    How to Apply

    With the Japan-U.S. Teacher Exchange Program, the Institute of International Education (IIE) provides 24 U.S. teachers and administrators the opportunity to travel to Japan for fifteen days. Recipients also attend a conference in San Francisco and collaborate with Japanese teachers participating in the program. Unlike my program, the ESD asks that teachers develop curriculum in conjunction with the trip.

    The deadline to submit the online application, which includes two online references, is Tuesday, January 31, 2012. You can find more information at: http://www.iie.org/Programs/ESD.

     

    Another Opportunity: GEEO

    In addition, I wantto bring your attention to the Global Exploration for Educators Organization (GEEO), which runs fee-based international trips for teachers. Please note that the GEEO is not affiliated in any way with IIE. However, if you are interested in international travel, you might want to look into their programs. For more information on GEEO, visit their Web site.  www.geeo.org.

     

    A Personal Note on Applying to Be a Traveling Educator

    A few years ago on a whim I signed up for a six-month teaching internship in Sweden and was selected. I just wouldn’t even know where to begin on how much I learned through that experience. I have no doubt that it very much makes me who I am today.

    I applied for the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund on a similar whim. I was studying for my culminating exam for my Education Specialist degree and found a small address on the JFMF application process in my notebook. The note was over a year old — I'd made it when a peer mentioned the program in passing after finishing a presentation. I clicked on the link for the program and then sighed, seeing that I had missed the deadline by one day. I signed up for their newsletter and told myself I would apply the following year. A few hours later, I received an email that said the JFMF deadline had been extended to the following Monday due to a technical glitch in receiving applications online. "That was my sign," I thought, and away I went, completing the application. I literally jumped up and down after I ripped that acceptance letter open at the mailbox.

    Then last year I was afforded the opportunity to attend a NASA Space Camp in Turkey for ten days with a group of 6th graders. Again, I said yes on a whim, half expecting something to go wrong or to be excluded from the trip somehow. It was a wonderful learning experience as well. And do I have plans for an international opportunity this summer? Yes I do!

     

    So Just Apply

    Please feel free to write me with any questions you have. Meanwhile, here is an old blog I kept while traveling to Japan. It also has pictures from Greece and Italy, along with a splash of posts about running. You’ll find my trip to Japan under October 2006.

    http://bunyia.blogspot.com/

     

    Do it!

    In summary, make that jump: don’t be afraid to apply. The worst thing that can happen is that you are not accepted.

    Angela

     

     

     

    In 2006, I was afforded an all-expenses paid adventure to Japan through the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund (JFMF). This included a three-week tour of Japanese schools, cultural expeditions, learning, and friendship. The only thing the program requested in exchange was that I share the knowledge I had gained upon returning to the United States. It truly was life-altering for me, and I will be eternally grateful for having had the opportunity.

    Sadly, because of economic struggles, the JFMF has dissolved. Luckily, a smaller program has been created and is entering its third active year. I would like to take a second to encourage you to apply for the Japan-U.S. Teacher Exchange Program for Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). That may be a mouthful, but reviewing the process will not be a waste of your time.

    How to Apply

    With the Japan-U.S. Teacher Exchange Program, the Institute of International Education (IIE) provides 24 U.S. teachers and administrators the opportunity to travel to Japan for fifteen days. Recipients also attend a conference in San Francisco and collaborate with Japanese teachers participating in the program. Unlike my program, the ESD asks that teachers develop curriculum in conjunction with the trip.

    The deadline to submit the online application, which includes two online references, is Tuesday, January 31, 2012. You can find more information at: http://www.iie.org/Programs/ESD.

     

    Another Opportunity: GEEO

    In addition, I wantto bring your attention to the Global Exploration for Educators Organization (GEEO), which runs fee-based international trips for teachers. Please note that the GEEO is not affiliated in any way with IIE. However, if you are interested in international travel, you might want to look into their programs. For more information on GEEO, visit their Web site.  www.geeo.org.

     

    A Personal Note on Applying to Be a Traveling Educator

    A few years ago on a whim I signed up for a six-month teaching internship in Sweden and was selected. I just wouldn’t even know where to begin on how much I learned through that experience. I have no doubt that it very much makes me who I am today.

    I applied for the Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund on a similar whim. I was studying for my culminating exam for my Education Specialist degree and found a small address on the JFMF application process in my notebook. The note was over a year old — I'd made it when a peer mentioned the program in passing after finishing a presentation. I clicked on the link for the program and then sighed, seeing that I had missed the deadline by one day. I signed up for their newsletter and told myself I would apply the following year. A few hours later, I received an email that said the JFMF deadline had been extended to the following Monday due to a technical glitch in receiving applications online. "That was my sign," I thought, and away I went, completing the application. I literally jumped up and down after I ripped that acceptance letter open at the mailbox.

    Then last year I was afforded the opportunity to attend a NASA Space Camp in Turkey for ten days with a group of 6th graders. Again, I said yes on a whim, half expecting something to go wrong or to be excluded from the trip somehow. It was a wonderful learning experience as well. And do I have plans for an international opportunity this summer? Yes I do!

     

    So Just Apply

    Please feel free to write me with any questions you have. Meanwhile, here is an old blog I kept while traveling to Japan. It also has pictures from Greece and Italy, along with a splash of posts about running. You’ll find my trip to Japan under October 2006.

    http://bunyia.blogspot.com/

     

    Do it!

    In summary, make that jump: don’t be afraid to apply. The worst thing that can happen is that you are not accepted.

    Angela

     

     

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Angela's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
Tips for Tackling Teacher Stress

It’s no secret that teaching is one of the most stressful jobs around. Thankfully, it is also one of the most rewarding. Here are my five magical tips that have kept stress and demands at bay.

By Angela Bunyi
November 30, 2016
Blog Post
5 Ways to Foster Creativity in Students and Why You Should!

In a TED Talk 10 years ago, Sir Ken Robinson argued that creativity plays a crucial role in preparing our students for the jobs of the future. Read on to see how to develop creative thinking in your classroom, all while creating a little fun too.

By Angela Bunyi
October 4, 2016
Blog Post
Kakooma Your Way to Math Fluency
If you have students, grades K–12, that are secret finger counters (yourself included), you MUST read on. Greg Tang can help with his new game, Kakooma.
By Angela Bunyi
May 21, 2012
Blog Post
Summer Writing Through Blogging: The Power of Social Media

In the process of putting a workshop for parents on summer writing, I realized we hadn’t prepared a viable platform for students to use. Learn how I started a social media frenzy in my school, and how writing has caught on like fire.

By Angela Bunyi
May 7, 2012

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us