Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
January 26, 2017 Book Extension Ideas: Abiyoyo By Andrea Maurer
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    The school year would not be complete without having my students experience the South African folktale, Abiyoyo, by Pete Seeger. To purchase this book for your own classroom, just click on this link or click on the image of the book below. This is one of my most favorite books to read with my students. Let it be yours too!

     

    Here is a step-by-step of how I approach this book and the activities that follow:

    1. Sense of Place

    Abiyoyo is a South African folktale about a ukulele-playing boy and his trickster/magician father who are ostracized for the son's irritating music and the father's magic pranks. In the end, the two use their skills to rid the village of the terrible giant, Abiyoyo, and are welcomed back as heroes. I start off the lesson by showing my students where South Africa is on the globe. Throughout the week, students love having a chance to come up and show where we live and where South Africa is on the globe.

     

    2. Prediction and Actual

    I have the students listen to part of the story. I have a cassette tape of James Earl Jones reading Abiyoyo. (Yes, a cassette, and it is one of my most prized possessions!) I stop the story ¾ of the way in, just as the father and son are walking toward the hillside to confront Abiyoyo. I ask the students what they predict will happen at the end of the story. They get into their TALKING PARTNERS groups and discuss their predictions. Then they write and/or draw their prediction on the prediction/actual response page.

    As the students are responding, I walk around and ask them why they think their prediction will happen at the end of the story. This gives me some one-on-one time with each student to see if the reason for their prediction makes sense. Then, we listen to the rest of the story and discuss what actually happened at the end. The students draw and/or write what happened on the actual portion of the response page. (Click here to download the Prediction/Actual response page.)

     

    3. Elements of the Story

    Next, we dig a little deeper into the text by focusing on the elements of the story. In a small group the students listen to the story at the listening center. The students get storyboards, which are simple dry erase boards labeled Characters, Setting, Beginning, Middle, and End. Each student chooses a different element to draw and/or write about. When done, the students share out their response. (Click here to download the Characters/Setting and the Beginning/Middle/End response pages.)

          

    4. Problem/Solution and Cause/Effect

    Going even deeper, I differentiate discussing the problem and the solution in small groups. For my English learners, we go page-by-page discussing the illustrations and the text leading up to the problem and then solution. The students write and/or draw their responses. I created a sentence frame for the students to refer to when sharing out their responses. Sentence frame: The problem in the story is ___________. The solution is _________________. (Click here to download the Problem/Solution response page.)

       

    For my next group, we look to the illustrations and text to help us recognize when the problem presented itself and when we knew there was a clear solution. We create a problem/solution anchor chart so the students can refer to it when they are writing and/or drawing their responses.

    For the readers in the class we also take a close look at the text and illustrations in the story. We know that a story can have many different problems going on, so we focus on the main problem and solution. Then we discuss all other sub-problems and solutions in the story. The students write and draw the cause and effect of each problem. (Click here to download the Cause/Effect response page.)

    I also have the students buddy read portions of the text to each other. We work on reading with expression and siting evidence from the text.

    5. My Favorite Part of the Story is…

    After you have spent this week going over all the different aspects of the story, have the students respond to what their favorite part is. (Click here to download My Favorite Part of the Story is… response page.)

    Now, for the most prep-free, easiest, and cutest art projects to gather together for this story — create Abiyoyo! All I do is pull out the collage center which consists of drawers with leftover scraps of construction paper. I put o

    ut glue, pom-poms, and scissors. Students are to create their version of Abiyoyo. However BIG however small, however wide, however tall — it is up to them!

    A MUST-DO!

    The Ukulele Cutout (Click here to download and print a step by step instruction of this project.) Your students will be strumming and singing their ukuleles all the way home!

      

    On a side note, we were fortunate enough to know a student who knows how to play the ukulele. The students were thrilled to see a peer actually play a song for them. It truly is such a joy to have students share their talents with each other.

     

    Abiyoyo becomes such a special book to the class. I really hope you get a chance to share it with your students.

     

    The school year would not be complete without having my students experience the South African folktale, Abiyoyo, by Pete Seeger. To purchase this book for your own classroom, just click on this link or click on the image of the book below. This is one of my most favorite books to read with my students. Let it be yours too!

     

    Here is a step-by-step of how I approach this book and the activities that follow:

    1. Sense of Place

    Abiyoyo is a South African folktale about a ukulele-playing boy and his trickster/magician father who are ostracized for the son's irritating music and the father's magic pranks. In the end, the two use their skills to rid the village of the terrible giant, Abiyoyo, and are welcomed back as heroes. I start off the lesson by showing my students where South Africa is on the globe. Throughout the week, students love having a chance to come up and show where we live and where South Africa is on the globe.

     

    2. Prediction and Actual

    I have the students listen to part of the story. I have a cassette tape of James Earl Jones reading Abiyoyo. (Yes, a cassette, and it is one of my most prized possessions!) I stop the story ¾ of the way in, just as the father and son are walking toward the hillside to confront Abiyoyo. I ask the students what they predict will happen at the end of the story. They get into their TALKING PARTNERS groups and discuss their predictions. Then they write and/or draw their prediction on the prediction/actual response page.

    As the students are responding, I walk around and ask them why they think their prediction will happen at the end of the story. This gives me some one-on-one time with each student to see if the reason for their prediction makes sense. Then, we listen to the rest of the story and discuss what actually happened at the end. The students draw and/or write what happened on the actual portion of the response page. (Click here to download the Prediction/Actual response page.)

     

    3. Elements of the Story

    Next, we dig a little deeper into the text by focusing on the elements of the story. In a small group the students listen to the story at the listening center. The students get storyboards, which are simple dry erase boards labeled Characters, Setting, Beginning, Middle, and End. Each student chooses a different element to draw and/or write about. When done, the students share out their response. (Click here to download the Characters/Setting and the Beginning/Middle/End response pages.)

          

    4. Problem/Solution and Cause/Effect

    Going even deeper, I differentiate discussing the problem and the solution in small groups. For my English learners, we go page-by-page discussing the illustrations and the text leading up to the problem and then solution. The students write and/or draw their responses. I created a sentence frame for the students to refer to when sharing out their responses. Sentence frame: The problem in the story is ___________. The solution is _________________. (Click here to download the Problem/Solution response page.)

       

    For my next group, we look to the illustrations and text to help us recognize when the problem presented itself and when we knew there was a clear solution. We create a problem/solution anchor chart so the students can refer to it when they are writing and/or drawing their responses.

    For the readers in the class we also take a close look at the text and illustrations in the story. We know that a story can have many different problems going on, so we focus on the main problem and solution. Then we discuss all other sub-problems and solutions in the story. The students write and draw the cause and effect of each problem. (Click here to download the Cause/Effect response page.)

    I also have the students buddy read portions of the text to each other. We work on reading with expression and siting evidence from the text.

    5. My Favorite Part of the Story is…

    After you have spent this week going over all the different aspects of the story, have the students respond to what their favorite part is. (Click here to download My Favorite Part of the Story is… response page.)

    Now, for the most prep-free, easiest, and cutest art projects to gather together for this story — create Abiyoyo! All I do is pull out the collage center which consists of drawers with leftover scraps of construction paper. I put o

    ut glue, pom-poms, and scissors. Students are to create their version of Abiyoyo. However BIG however small, however wide, however tall — it is up to them!

    A MUST-DO!

    The Ukulele Cutout (Click here to download and print a step by step instruction of this project.) Your students will be strumming and singing their ukuleles all the way home!

      

    On a side note, we were fortunate enough to know a student who knows how to play the ukulele. The students were thrilled to see a peer actually play a song for them. It truly is such a joy to have students share their talents with each other.

     

    Abiyoyo becomes such a special book to the class. I really hope you get a chance to share it with your students.

     

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us