Create a List

List Name

Rename this List
Save to
Back to the Top Teaching Blog
April 13, 2016

Picture-Perfect Poetry Projects

By Amanda Nehring
Grades PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5

    April is National Poetry Month which means it is the perfect time for your students to get creative writing their own poems. Many younger children equate poetry exclusively with rhyming verses, so this is a great opportunity to teach your students that poems come in all shapes, sizes, and types. Visual poems, like shape poems and rebuses, are always a favorite for students. Try these ideas for picture-perfect poetry projects with your students this month!

     

    Shape PoemsShape Poems

    Shape poems provide students with instant inspiration. The idea behind a shape poem is that students will select an object, like an animal, toy, or favorite food, and write a poem based on that object. The fun part is that the students then must write their poem inside the shape of their chosen object. Older students can use their words to visually create the shape of their object, but for younger students I like to provide them with pictures to fill with their poems. After students have written their shape poems inside their pictures they can then decorate them to instantly create an illustration to accompany their poem. You’ll be amazed at how creative students will get and how beautiful their poems will be. Scholastic Printables is offering a tree, a butterfly, and a turtle as free downloadable shapes for your students to use for their poems. Just print out the patterns and watch your little ones become poets!

     

    Rebuses

    A Rebus PoemA rebus is a poem that replaces some of the written words of each verse with a picture. Read The Best Easter Egg Hunt Ever and School Day! to your students as examples of rebus poems. Then, once students understand the concept, let them begin to write rebuses of their very own. I give my students old copies of Scholastic News, magazines and newspapers to peruse for pictures to use in their poems. The students love cutting out little pictures and gluing them in their poems to represent words within their verses. Plus, since April also has Earth Day, students are able to reuse old materials instead of throwing them away! It is a great way to tie in the topic of conservation to your poetry unit.

     

    Scholastic’s Poetry Idea Engine

     

    Poetry Idea Engine

    For a tech-savvy tool for creating poetry with your students, check out Scholastic’s Poetry Idea Engine. This web-based game allows students to practice writing haiku, limericks, cinquains, and free verse poems. It begins by introducing students to each type of poem and provides an example for them to read. When students are ready the game allows them to create their own poems, choosing words to complete the verses on the screen. The fact that students must only choose one word per verse makes this game perfectly appropriate for the early elementary grades. As students finish writing a poem within the Poetry Idea Engine they can choose to either print their poem or keep playing to write another. Make the game even more fun by having your students illustrate their poems after they print them.


    National Poetry Month is the perfect time to open up a whole new genre of writing for your students. I hope you are able to use these ideas in your own classroom. I’d love to hear about the poems your students create, so please leave comments below! Happy National Poetry Month!

    April is National Poetry Month which means it is the perfect time for your students to get creative writing their own poems. Many younger children equate poetry exclusively with rhyming verses, so this is a great opportunity to teach your students that poems come in all shapes, sizes, and types. Visual poems, like shape poems and rebuses, are always a favorite for students. Try these ideas for picture-perfect poetry projects with your students this month!

     

    Shape PoemsShape Poems

    Shape poems provide students with instant inspiration. The idea behind a shape poem is that students will select an object, like an animal, toy, or favorite food, and write a poem based on that object. The fun part is that the students then must write their poem inside the shape of their chosen object. Older students can use their words to visually create the shape of their object, but for younger students I like to provide them with pictures to fill with their poems. After students have written their shape poems inside their pictures they can then decorate them to instantly create an illustration to accompany their poem. You’ll be amazed at how creative students will get and how beautiful their poems will be. Scholastic Printables is offering a tree, a butterfly, and a turtle as free downloadable shapes for your students to use for their poems. Just print out the patterns and watch your little ones become poets!

     

    Rebuses

    A Rebus PoemA rebus is a poem that replaces some of the written words of each verse with a picture. Read The Best Easter Egg Hunt Ever and School Day! to your students as examples of rebus poems. Then, once students understand the concept, let them begin to write rebuses of their very own. I give my students old copies of Scholastic News, magazines and newspapers to peruse for pictures to use in their poems. The students love cutting out little pictures and gluing them in their poems to represent words within their verses. Plus, since April also has Earth Day, students are able to reuse old materials instead of throwing them away! It is a great way to tie in the topic of conservation to your poetry unit.

     

    Scholastic’s Poetry Idea Engine

     

    Poetry Idea Engine

    For a tech-savvy tool for creating poetry with your students, check out Scholastic’s Poetry Idea Engine. This web-based game allows students to practice writing haiku, limericks, cinquains, and free verse poems. It begins by introducing students to each type of poem and provides an example for them to read. When students are ready the game allows them to create their own poems, choosing words to complete the verses on the screen. The fact that students must only choose one word per verse makes this game perfectly appropriate for the early elementary grades. As students finish writing a poem within the Poetry Idea Engine they can choose to either print their poem or keep playing to write another. Make the game even more fun by having your students illustrate their poems after they print them.


    National Poetry Month is the perfect time to open up a whole new genre of writing for your students. I hope you are able to use these ideas in your own classroom. I’d love to hear about the poems your students create, so please leave comments below! Happy National Poetry Month!

Comments

Share your ideas about this article

Amanda's Most Recent Posts
Blog Post
It's National Write to a Friend Month!

December is National Write to a Friend Month, so let's look at some great books, crafts, and activities to encourage your first and second graders to get writing. 

By Amanda Nehring
November 30, 2016
Blog Post
October Read-Aloud Books and Activities

From Fire Safety Week to Halloween, these read-aloud books and accompanying activities will help your class fall into October themes. 

By Amanda Nehring
October 6, 2016
Blog Post
Printable Teacher Planner

Get organized for the start of school with this free printable teacher planner. 

By Amanda Nehring
August 18, 2016
Blog Post
Make the Most of Your Summer

Here are some tips for making the most of summertime both professionally and personally.

By Amanda Nehring
May 24, 2016
My Scholastic

Susan Cheyney

GRADES: 1-2
About Us