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April 26, 2016 Making the Most of Scholastic News Magazines By Amanda Nehring
Grades 1–2, 3–5

    Our school days are jam-packed trying to meet the Common Core State Standards and there seems to be little time for extra activities. This is what makes Scholastic News magazines so attractive to me. They don’t have to be extra because they fit seamlessly into the reading, science, and social studies lessons we already teach. The magazine is one of my favorite resources, and to get a better idea of how to use Scholastic News in your classroom, take a look at how I incorporate it into my instruction each week.

    The first thing I do when I receive my monthly packet of Scholastic News is to sort through the content and compare the topics with my lessons planned for that month. The team at Scholastic does a fabulous job of making sure that the articles are relevant to what teachers are teaching, so I can almost always find a way to incorporate the magazines into my lessons. Occasionally I find that an article doesn’t match up with my science or social studies curriculum, but in those cases I use it in reading instruction instead. Once you have figured out where to include the week’s news articles, you can begin to explore the vast resources provided free with every subscription. Here’s my Top 10 List of favorite Scholastic News resources:

    Top Ten Scholastic News Resources

    10. Letter Home to Parents: Send this letter to parents at the beginning of the year so that your students can access the digital resources at home. All you have to do is include the code specific to your class.

    9. Yearly Planning Calendar: Scholastic News’ editors provide you with an outline of article topics so you can plan ahead for the whole year!

    8. Monthly Calendar Worksheet: Each month your students can practice calendar skills as well as focus on the important events and holidays of the month.

    7. Digital Vocabulary Words: Front-load important content related vocabulary with this digital tool that provides real-life color photographs and age-appropriate definitions.  

    6. Teacher’s Guide: You’ll find everything from objectives and standards to worksheets and lesson ideas in this hard copy (as well as digital) resource.

    5. Skills Game: Assess students’ understanding of the target reading skill with a fun and interactive online game made especially for each edition.

    4. Skills Worksheet: This full color worksheet is on the back page of each magazine and helps to reinforce the core skill while encouraging students to use graphs, data, and text to support their answers.

    3. Additional Printables: Available for download in both English and Spanish, these worksheets provide students with extra practice on both the nonfiction topic and the reading core skill.

    2. Videos: I can’t say enough how much my students and I love these videos. Scholastic does a wonderful job presenting real-world examples for each topic that can be used before, during, or after reading the articles.

    1. Digital Editions: Whether you are using a smartboard, a projector, or even just accessing articles on the computer or iPad, the digital editions in both English and Spanish are highly interactive, allowing you to highlight, type and draw to fully engage in the reading experience.

    Now that you have an idea of all of the incredible resources available with Scholastic News, you may be wondering how you can use them in your own class. Below are just a few of the many ways I have incorporated the magazines into my weekly instruction.

     

    Science or Social Studies Lessons

    Using Scholastic News magazines for science or social studies instructionMy school has done away with textbooks for science and social studies instruction and moved toward high-quality resource materials that present students with new content in the form of nonfiction texts. I have chosen to use Scholastic News articles for this purpose since they are perfect for introducing your whole group of students to a science or social studies theme.

    I usually begin the lesson with a viewing of the topic’s videos and a preview of the content vocabulary available in the digital resources. Next we read each section of the text together, stopping to discuss the graphs, data and other nonfiction text features we encounter along the way. Finally we complete the skills worksheet on the back page as a whole class.

    I love that I can either choose to use the digital edition displayed on my projector or even just hold up the large teacher copy while the students follow along on their own smaller versions. The students love getting to work on the additional printable worksheets in small groups or independently. They also know that they play the online skills game during our computer center sometime that week, which is always a favorite activity!

     

    Close Reading with Scholastic News magazinesClose Reading

    From time to time I find that the week’s Scholastic News article is best suited for whole group close reading practice. First I ask the students to listen along as I read the article aloud. Then we go back for additional reads, using our Close Reading Symbols worksheet to help us mark the article and discuss what we have read. This is one of my favorite features of the magazine: each child has their own copy on which they can write, take notes and respond to the text. The reading level of the articles is age-appropriate, the topics are engaging, and the length is perfect for repeated reads. These magazines are absolutely ideal for close reading!

     

    Reading Skill Lessons

    The editors at Scholastic News write each weekly edition so that it specifically meets a Common Core reading skill. Because the articles present skills such as comparison and contrast, nonfiction text features, citing text evidence, and even punctuation, I am able to use the magazines to enhance my whole group reading instruction. My class reads the article together, finding examples of the reading skill featured. Then we complete the printable worksheets that assess the skill of the week. If I have the time we often play the online skills game as a whole group so that we can check for our understanding of the target reading skill. The students love it and so do I!

    I also use Scholastic News during my guided reading instruction or for independent reading and writing practice for students. The possibilities are endless. I hope you got some inspiration for using the magazines in your own classroom.


    GIVEAWAY! You could win a free, one-year subscription for one class to a Scholastic Classroom magazine of your choice (ARV $158). To enter for a chance to win, simply leave a comment in the comment section of this blog post below and include #sweepstakes in your post.

    NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. One entry per person. Open to legal residents of the United States age 18 or older. All entries must be submitted by 11:59:59 pm ET, May 10, 2016. Read the complete legal rules here. Subject to all applicable laws. Void where prohibited.
     

    Our school days are jam-packed trying to meet the Common Core State Standards and there seems to be little time for extra activities. This is what makes Scholastic News magazines so attractive to me. They don’t have to be extra because they fit seamlessly into the reading, science, and social studies lessons we already teach. The magazine is one of my favorite resources, and to get a better idea of how to use Scholastic News in your classroom, take a look at how I incorporate it into my instruction each week.

    The first thing I do when I receive my monthly packet of Scholastic News is to sort through the content and compare the topics with my lessons planned for that month. The team at Scholastic does a fabulous job of making sure that the articles are relevant to what teachers are teaching, so I can almost always find a way to incorporate the magazines into my lessons. Occasionally I find that an article doesn’t match up with my science or social studies curriculum, but in those cases I use it in reading instruction instead. Once you have figured out where to include the week’s news articles, you can begin to explore the vast resources provided free with every subscription. Here’s my Top 10 List of favorite Scholastic News resources:

    Top Ten Scholastic News Resources

    10. Letter Home to Parents: Send this letter to parents at the beginning of the year so that your students can access the digital resources at home. All you have to do is include the code specific to your class.

    9. Yearly Planning Calendar: Scholastic News’ editors provide you with an outline of article topics so you can plan ahead for the whole year!

    8. Monthly Calendar Worksheet: Each month your students can practice calendar skills as well as focus on the important events and holidays of the month.

    7. Digital Vocabulary Words: Front-load important content related vocabulary with this digital tool that provides real-life color photographs and age-appropriate definitions.  

    6. Teacher’s Guide: You’ll find everything from objectives and standards to worksheets and lesson ideas in this hard copy (as well as digital) resource.

    5. Skills Game: Assess students’ understanding of the target reading skill with a fun and interactive online game made especially for each edition.

    4. Skills Worksheet: This full color worksheet is on the back page of each magazine and helps to reinforce the core skill while encouraging students to use graphs, data, and text to support their answers.

    3. Additional Printables: Available for download in both English and Spanish, these worksheets provide students with extra practice on both the nonfiction topic and the reading core skill.

    2. Videos: I can’t say enough how much my students and I love these videos. Scholastic does a wonderful job presenting real-world examples for each topic that can be used before, during, or after reading the articles.

    1. Digital Editions: Whether you are using a smartboard, a projector, or even just accessing articles on the computer or iPad, the digital editions in both English and Spanish are highly interactive, allowing you to highlight, type and draw to fully engage in the reading experience.

    Now that you have an idea of all of the incredible resources available with Scholastic News, you may be wondering how you can use them in your own class. Below are just a few of the many ways I have incorporated the magazines into my weekly instruction.

     

    Science or Social Studies Lessons

    Using Scholastic News magazines for science or social studies instructionMy school has done away with textbooks for science and social studies instruction and moved toward high-quality resource materials that present students with new content in the form of nonfiction texts. I have chosen to use Scholastic News articles for this purpose since they are perfect for introducing your whole group of students to a science or social studies theme.

    I usually begin the lesson with a viewing of the topic’s videos and a preview of the content vocabulary available in the digital resources. Next we read each section of the text together, stopping to discuss the graphs, data and other nonfiction text features we encounter along the way. Finally we complete the skills worksheet on the back page as a whole class.

    I love that I can either choose to use the digital edition displayed on my projector or even just hold up the large teacher copy while the students follow along on their own smaller versions. The students love getting to work on the additional printable worksheets in small groups or independently. They also know that they play the online skills game during our computer center sometime that week, which is always a favorite activity!

     

    Close Reading with Scholastic News magazinesClose Reading

    From time to time I find that the week’s Scholastic News article is best suited for whole group close reading practice. First I ask the students to listen along as I read the article aloud. Then we go back for additional reads, using our Close Reading Symbols worksheet to help us mark the article and discuss what we have read. This is one of my favorite features of the magazine: each child has their own copy on which they can write, take notes and respond to the text. The reading level of the articles is age-appropriate, the topics are engaging, and the length is perfect for repeated reads. These magazines are absolutely ideal for close reading!

     

    Reading Skill Lessons

    The editors at Scholastic News write each weekly edition so that it specifically meets a Common Core reading skill. Because the articles present skills such as comparison and contrast, nonfiction text features, citing text evidence, and even punctuation, I am able to use the magazines to enhance my whole group reading instruction. My class reads the article together, finding examples of the reading skill featured. Then we complete the printable worksheets that assess the skill of the week. If I have the time we often play the online skills game as a whole group so that we can check for our understanding of the target reading skill. The students love it and so do I!

    I also use Scholastic News during my guided reading instruction or for independent reading and writing practice for students. The possibilities are endless. I hope you got some inspiration for using the magazines in your own classroom.


    GIVEAWAY! You could win a free, one-year subscription for one class to a Scholastic Classroom magazine of your choice (ARV $158). To enter for a chance to win, simply leave a comment in the comment section of this blog post below and include #sweepstakes in your post.

    NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. One entry per person. Open to legal residents of the United States age 18 or older. All entries must be submitted by 11:59:59 pm ET, May 10, 2016. Read the complete legal rules here. Subject to all applicable laws. Void where prohibited.
     

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