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March 29, 2016

4 Free Spring Printables for ELLs

By Amanda Nehring
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    A complete and well-rounded program of instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) must allow students to practice working in each of the four domains of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. If you are looking for some new resources and ideas for meeting each of these domains this spring, look no further than Scholastic Printables! April means the launch of a whole bunch of new lesson plans, worksheets, activities and stories in the Printables store and I’m excited to get to share how I'm using these four with you. Each of the following Printables will be free for a limited time, so check out how you can use these fabulous new resources to meet the needs of your ELL students.

     

    Listening

    Glyphs make a fun class craft as well as great way for your ELL students to practice their English listening skills. First, give each child a copy of the New Nests for All glyph from Printables. Using the Legend page, read each of the five questions aloud to your class. Have your students circle their answers to each question on their legend copy. After students have identified their answers, go back through the list of questions and ask students to listen carefully as you tell them how to complete their glyph picture according to their responses. Go step by step through the glyph instructions, reading the options slowly and clearly. Make sure to repeat yourself as necessary for your ELL students to follow along. Refer your students to the legend, showing them how we can use written materials to help us as we listen to instructions. By the end of this listening activity your classroom will be filled with beautiful and unique birds nests representative of all your little kiddos!

    Bird Nest Glyph

     

    Speaking

    Student Skit

    Speaking English in front of an audience can be one of the most difficult skills for ELL students to master, but it can also be one of the most enjoyable thanks to this "Where Do Animals Go When It Rains?" play. Performing a short skit is a great way to help your ELL students practice speaking English. Begin by working with your students to do repeated reads of the play’s script. Repetition allows your ELL students to build fluency as they read in English. It will also strengthen your students’ confidence to have practiced repeatedly reading their lines aloud. To get into character, have your students make costumes for each of the animals they will be playing, and create a mural backdrop to set the scene for the story. Once your students are ready to perform their short skit, invite other classmates, school staff, and even parents to watch the performance. You’ll be amazed at the pride and confidence your students will demonstrate as they perform in English.

     

    A student's rainforest drawingReading

    With first and second grade English Language Learners, I have found it is important to remember that a short reading selection can really go a long way toward helping develop English reading skills. I found this Rain Forest song/poem in the April Grades 1-2 Printables Packet (you need to be a subscriber to access the entire packet) and think it will be perfect for a variety of reading activities with ELL students. Here are some ideas for using this poem to practice reading in your classroom:

    • After singing the song together, identify the poetry characteristics. Songs, just like poems, contain repetition, beat, rhyme, and emotion. Discuss each of these characteristics of poetry with your students and then reread (or sing) the song to discover examples. You can have students highlight rhyming words, create hand motions for the repeated phrases, act out the emotions presented through punctuation, and even clap along to the beat.

    • Learn about the plants and animals of the rainforest by researching the living things mentioned in this poem. Encourage students to look for information on how deforestation is affecting these living things. What ideas do the students have for conserving the rainforest habitats of the plants and animals they have studied? Allow your students to create group posters or a class book to present the information learned through their rainforest research. Be sure to provide your ELL students with resources appropriate to their reading levels. Group students with partners of varying levels of ability as well as language acquisition. Encourage all students to use pictures, graphs, and other visuals to present their findings to the class.

    • Songs and poetry help bring a new topic to life through the use of descriptive words. Provide each of your students with a copy of the song “Rain Forest.” Read or sing the song aloud, stopping throughout to show your students photographs of each rainforest plant and animal mentioned. This will help your ELL students build rich new vocabulary related to the rainforest. As an artistic final activity, have your students draw pictures of the rainforest images that the song creates in their minds.

     

    Writing

    Writing promptsMuch like speaking, writing can be a daunting task for young ELL students. Anytime you are asking your students to produce written language, it is a good idea to have a motivating activity to help calm their nerves. I found these 20 April writing prompts that I can’t wait to turn into a classroom writing activity. The first step is to cut out the 20 writing prompts and glue each one to an index card. Next, have your students each choose a card and write a short response to the prompt. To make it even more fun and seasonal, use an egg timer (for an Easter tie-in) to give your students a limited amount of time to finish their compositions. Remember that your ELL students will require a bit more time to write their stories and poems, so make sure to give all students at least 10 minutes per writing activity. Once they have finished their first story, students can trade cards and do another one of the prompts. You can make it into a game that will motivate your ELL students to practice writing in English, taking away some of the fear that can come with being asked to write.

    I hope you are able to use some of these wonderful resources from Scholastic Printables with your ELL students this spring. If you do, please leave a comment below letting me know what you tried with your class. Remember, these resources are free for a limited time only, so go ahead and grab them while you can. As always, thanks for stopping by! Have a great week and Happy Spring!

     

    A complete and well-rounded program of instruction for English Language Learners (ELLs) must allow students to practice working in each of the four domains of language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. If you are looking for some new resources and ideas for meeting each of these domains this spring, look no further than Scholastic Printables! April means the launch of a whole bunch of new lesson plans, worksheets, activities and stories in the Printables store and I’m excited to get to share how I'm using these four with you. Each of the following Printables will be free for a limited time, so check out how you can use these fabulous new resources to meet the needs of your ELL students.

     

    Listening

    Glyphs make a fun class craft as well as great way for your ELL students to practice their English listening skills. First, give each child a copy of the New Nests for All glyph from Printables. Using the Legend page, read each of the five questions aloud to your class. Have your students circle their answers to each question on their legend copy. After students have identified their answers, go back through the list of questions and ask students to listen carefully as you tell them how to complete their glyph picture according to their responses. Go step by step through the glyph instructions, reading the options slowly and clearly. Make sure to repeat yourself as necessary for your ELL students to follow along. Refer your students to the legend, showing them how we can use written materials to help us as we listen to instructions. By the end of this listening activity your classroom will be filled with beautiful and unique birds nests representative of all your little kiddos!

    Bird Nest Glyph

     

    Speaking

    Student Skit

    Speaking English in front of an audience can be one of the most difficult skills for ELL students to master, but it can also be one of the most enjoyable thanks to this "Where Do Animals Go When It Rains?" play. Performing a short skit is a great way to help your ELL students practice speaking English. Begin by working with your students to do repeated reads of the play’s script. Repetition allows your ELL students to build fluency as they read in English. It will also strengthen your students’ confidence to have practiced repeatedly reading their lines aloud. To get into character, have your students make costumes for each of the animals they will be playing, and create a mural backdrop to set the scene for the story. Once your students are ready to perform their short skit, invite other classmates, school staff, and even parents to watch the performance. You’ll be amazed at the pride and confidence your students will demonstrate as they perform in English.

     

    A student's rainforest drawingReading

    With first and second grade English Language Learners, I have found it is important to remember that a short reading selection can really go a long way toward helping develop English reading skills. I found this Rain Forest song/poem in the April Grades 1-2 Printables Packet (you need to be a subscriber to access the entire packet) and think it will be perfect for a variety of reading activities with ELL students. Here are some ideas for using this poem to practice reading in your classroom:

    • After singing the song together, identify the poetry characteristics. Songs, just like poems, contain repetition, beat, rhyme, and emotion. Discuss each of these characteristics of poetry with your students and then reread (or sing) the song to discover examples. You can have students highlight rhyming words, create hand motions for the repeated phrases, act out the emotions presented through punctuation, and even clap along to the beat.

    • Learn about the plants and animals of the rainforest by researching the living things mentioned in this poem. Encourage students to look for information on how deforestation is affecting these living things. What ideas do the students have for conserving the rainforest habitats of the plants and animals they have studied? Allow your students to create group posters or a class book to present the information learned through their rainforest research. Be sure to provide your ELL students with resources appropriate to their reading levels. Group students with partners of varying levels of ability as well as language acquisition. Encourage all students to use pictures, graphs, and other visuals to present their findings to the class.

    • Songs and poetry help bring a new topic to life through the use of descriptive words. Provide each of your students with a copy of the song “Rain Forest.” Read or sing the song aloud, stopping throughout to show your students photographs of each rainforest plant and animal mentioned. This will help your ELL students build rich new vocabulary related to the rainforest. As an artistic final activity, have your students draw pictures of the rainforest images that the song creates in their minds.

     

    Writing

    Writing promptsMuch like speaking, writing can be a daunting task for young ELL students. Anytime you are asking your students to produce written language, it is a good idea to have a motivating activity to help calm their nerves. I found these 20 April writing prompts that I can’t wait to turn into a classroom writing activity. The first step is to cut out the 20 writing prompts and glue each one to an index card. Next, have your students each choose a card and write a short response to the prompt. To make it even more fun and seasonal, use an egg timer (for an Easter tie-in) to give your students a limited amount of time to finish their compositions. Remember that your ELL students will require a bit more time to write their stories and poems, so make sure to give all students at least 10 minutes per writing activity. Once they have finished their first story, students can trade cards and do another one of the prompts. You can make it into a game that will motivate your ELL students to practice writing in English, taking away some of the fear that can come with being asked to write.

    I hope you are able to use some of these wonderful resources from Scholastic Printables with your ELL students this spring. If you do, please leave a comment below letting me know what you tried with your class. Remember, these resources are free for a limited time only, so go ahead and grab them while you can. As always, thanks for stopping by! Have a great week and Happy Spring!

     

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