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November 4, 2014

How to Make Your Supplies Last Forever

By Allie Magnuson
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    If you teach kindergarten, toys are a part of your tools of the trade. If you are operating under a tight budget (and who isn't?), gently used toys help keep your toolbox full and functional. Keep your eyes open — especially during the summer — and you will often find the items listed below at tag sales, church bazaars, and white elephant sales. Here's what to keep in mind when you are in need of stocking your shelves.

    1. Look for retro toys, which are often sturdier than modern toys.

    The toys in the photo to the left were actually my daughter's. They still work, too! Why? They are well made, they don't need any batteries or electricity, and they have few, if any, loose parts.

     

    2. Look for materials that can be used over and over again, and for more than one purpose.

    Dry-erase boards and Magna Doodles are great for writing and art activities.

     

    3. Look for games that can withstand being used by kindergarteners.


    For instance, look for games that:

    • Don't have very many pieces

    • Have big and sturdy pieces, and/or generic pieces that can be easily replaced

    • Can be played more than one way

     

    All of these games fit those criteria:


    Twister

     

    Shut the Box

     

    Dominoes

     

    Checkers

     

    Bingo

     

    Playing Cards

     

    Dice

    If you teach kindergarten, toys are a part of your tools of the trade. If you are operating under a tight budget (and who isn't?), gently used toys help keep your toolbox full and functional. Keep your eyes open — especially during the summer — and you will often find the items listed below at tag sales, church bazaars, and white elephant sales. Here's what to keep in mind when you are in need of stocking your shelves.

    1. Look for retro toys, which are often sturdier than modern toys.

    The toys in the photo to the left were actually my daughter's. They still work, too! Why? They are well made, they don't need any batteries or electricity, and they have few, if any, loose parts.

     

    2. Look for materials that can be used over and over again, and for more than one purpose.

    Dry-erase boards and Magna Doodles are great for writing and art activities.

     

    3. Look for games that can withstand being used by kindergarteners.


    For instance, look for games that:

    • Don't have very many pieces

    • Have big and sturdy pieces, and/or generic pieces that can be easily replaced

    • Can be played more than one way

     

    All of these games fit those criteria:


    Twister

     

    Shut the Box

     

    Dominoes

     

    Checkers

     

    Bingo

     

    Playing Cards

     

    Dice

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