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March 10, 2015 5 Unique Games to Help Teach Rhyming Skills By Allie Magnuson
Grades PreK–K, 1–2

    As rhyming seems to be a hard concept for kinders to grasp, I needed to come up with ways to help my students understand it. Anchor charts were a good start, but not enough. I read some Dr. Seuss favorites to get them used to the sounds of rhymes (he is a rhyming master, and we celebrated his birthday this month), and then looked around for items I could use to teach rhyming words in a creative way. A few things from the dollar store here, a few things from the classroom there, and I soon had ideas for five center games. Check them out and see if they'd work for you!

     

    Like Attracts Like

    I found these large plastic magnets at my local Dollar Tree and bought a bunch of them. I divided them into five sets, one for every day of the week. Each set focused on a separate word family. I labeled half of the magnets in each set with words that rhyme, and half with words that don't rhyme. Then I pulled apart the ones with non-rhyming words and removed the magnets.

    The object is for the student to take one word at a time, and find all the words that rhyme with it by determining which ones attract to it.

     

    Chain Reaction

    Another great dollar store find was these links. I labeled them with different word families. The student must find all the words that rhyme and link them together, making a separate chain for each word family.

     

    Roll and Rhyme

    I had several blank dice in my classroom, but you can get the same ones on Amazon. I labeled two with a letter on each side, and two with a word family on each side. The player rolls all four dice, trying to make two words that rhyme.

    These are the letters and word families I used, because they all work together:

    Letter Dice: b, b, s, s, p, p
    Word Family Dice: it, in, un, op, at, et

     

    Thing 1 and Thing 2

    For this two-player game, I used my Dr. Seuss props and pieces from an old Scrabble game, but you can improvise with the materials. I divided the letter tiles into sets of two, and labeled the back of each set with words that rhyme.

    The tiles go into the hat. Each player gets a letter tray, and pulls out an equal number of tiles (the exact number depends on how many tiles you make). Player 1 lays down a tile. If Player 2 has the match, they lay the match down. Then Player 2 lays down a tile, and Player 1 looks for the match. And so on. If there is no match, no tile is laid down. This is a cooperative game, and the goal is to unite Thing 1 and Thing 2 by making more matches than non-matches. So if they make four out of six matches, they win!

     

    Dr. Seuss Rhymes

    There are three ways to play this game. For all of them, you will need some Dr. Seuss books and a copier.

    Version 1

    Copy some pages with one picture of things that rhyme. Have students identify the rhymes just by looking at the pictures.

    Version 2

    Copy some pages with more than one picture of things that rhyme. Cut out each picture and mix them up. Have students find the matches.

    Version 3

    For students that need more of a challenge, copy some pages that have rhymes with different spellings. Cut out each picture along with the words. Mix them up with non-rhyming words, and have students find the matches.

    As rhyming seems to be a hard concept for kinders to grasp, I needed to come up with ways to help my students understand it. Anchor charts were a good start, but not enough. I read some Dr. Seuss favorites to get them used to the sounds of rhymes (he is a rhyming master, and we celebrated his birthday this month), and then looked around for items I could use to teach rhyming words in a creative way. A few things from the dollar store here, a few things from the classroom there, and I soon had ideas for five center games. Check them out and see if they'd work for you!

     

    Like Attracts Like

    I found these large plastic magnets at my local Dollar Tree and bought a bunch of them. I divided them into five sets, one for every day of the week. Each set focused on a separate word family. I labeled half of the magnets in each set with words that rhyme, and half with words that don't rhyme. Then I pulled apart the ones with non-rhyming words and removed the magnets.

    The object is for the student to take one word at a time, and find all the words that rhyme with it by determining which ones attract to it.

     

    Chain Reaction

    Another great dollar store find was these links. I labeled them with different word families. The student must find all the words that rhyme and link them together, making a separate chain for each word family.

     

    Roll and Rhyme

    I had several blank dice in my classroom, but you can get the same ones on Amazon. I labeled two with a letter on each side, and two with a word family on each side. The player rolls all four dice, trying to make two words that rhyme.

    These are the letters and word families I used, because they all work together:

    Letter Dice: b, b, s, s, p, p
    Word Family Dice: it, in, un, op, at, et

     

    Thing 1 and Thing 2

    For this two-player game, I used my Dr. Seuss props and pieces from an old Scrabble game, but you can improvise with the materials. I divided the letter tiles into sets of two, and labeled the back of each set with words that rhyme.

    The tiles go into the hat. Each player gets a letter tray, and pulls out an equal number of tiles (the exact number depends on how many tiles you make). Player 1 lays down a tile. If Player 2 has the match, they lay the match down. Then Player 2 lays down a tile, and Player 1 looks for the match. And so on. If there is no match, no tile is laid down. This is a cooperative game, and the goal is to unite Thing 1 and Thing 2 by making more matches than non-matches. So if they make four out of six matches, they win!

     

    Dr. Seuss Rhymes

    There are three ways to play this game. For all of them, you will need some Dr. Seuss books and a copier.

    Version 1

    Copy some pages with one picture of things that rhyme. Have students identify the rhymes just by looking at the pictures.

    Version 2

    Copy some pages with more than one picture of things that rhyme. Cut out each picture and mix them up. Have students find the matches.

    Version 3

    For students that need more of a challenge, copy some pages that have rhymes with different spellings. Cut out each picture along with the words. Mix them up with non-rhyming words, and have students find the matches.

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