Using charts helps children see their own thinking represented visually and, at the same time, invites them to move to higher levels of thinking. Here is a process to follow to incorporate one type of chart-experience charts-into your classroom:

1 Try It. Engage children in a classroom experience, such as making play clay in your art center.

1 Try It. Engage children in a classroom experience, such as making play clay in your art center.

2 Talk About It. Later, talk with children about the experience. What materials did you use to make the clay? How did the clay feel? What did you make with the clay? What other things would you like to make?

3 Print It. Print children's responses to your questions on a large sheet of chart paper. Write children's names at the left of the chart, and their contributions, just as they say them, to the right of their names.

4 Draw It. Whenever possible, use a simple stick figure or drawing along with children's words. This will provide them with a pictorial clue when you "read" the chart again together.

5 Save It. Create a space in your group-time area where children can "read" their W chart on a bulletin board or easel stand.

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