• Cicadas have their hearing organs in their stomachs.
 
• Crickets have their hearing organs in their knees.
 
• Male mosquitoes hear with thousands of tiny hairs growing on their antennae.
 
• In some owl species, one ear is set higher than the other.
 
• A cat's external ear can rotates up to 180 degrees to locate and identify even the faintest of squeaks, peeps or rustling noises.
 
• A hippopotamus has small ears high on top of the heads. They are very open and stick up when they go underwater. In this way they can always hear even when they are underwater.
 
• Rabbits have very long ears on the top of their heads that help them
hear sounds from far away.
 
• Snakes do not have ears, but “hear” vibrations through their skin that is touching the ground.
 
• It is true that frogs do not have outside ears that direct sound inward to the ear drum as ours do. But they do have an ear drum (of sorts), and an inner ear. They hear with these structures as well as one more — their lungs! In this way, frogs can receive sound from the air and water.
 
• Bats make loud cries that are too high pitched for the human ear. Sound waves from these cries bounce off every object and echo back. They have very large ears to gather the sound that bounces back to them. This method is called echolocation. This is how the bat knows the location of everything around it, including their food, where they are. It is also how they communicate.
 
• Elephants have the largest of all ears. Elephant ears are very large and thin. They help the elephant detect very faint sounds as well as direction of the sound. Also the elephant uses his ears as a fan and a radiator. The blood vessels in the elephant's ears radiate heat. This keeps the elephant cool.