4 Ways to Make a Home Library for Your Kids

One way is to make it out of colored rocks. There are three other ways.
By Olafur Eliasson
Apr 05, 2018

Ages

Infant-4


Apr 05, 2018

The Quick Brown Fox  (Large Header)

Great stories never grow old! Chosen by children’s librarians at The New York Public Library, these 100 inspiring tales have thrilled generations of children and their parents — and are still flying off our shelves. Use this list and your library card to discover new worlds of wonder and adventure! (normal text - no styling)

1. A Bigger Building with More Kids  (Medium Header)

Goodreads is the largest social network for readers. Members provide ratings and reviews of books to express their personal opinions and to help others determine if they would enjoy a book. Goodreads respects the right of individuals to express themselves, but does not tolerate abusive behavior. (Indent)

Welcome to our bi-weekly update on events happening during the next two weeks at The New York Public Library (Pull Quote)

 

Paperback
(A Harry Potter adventure)
Travel backwards and forwards through time, backwards and forwards, backwards and forwards, again and again! This book listing was manually curated - all info was entered by hand. The info in the below book listing (Fantastic Beasts) was dynamically curated - after inputting the book's ISBN, all the data was pulled from our servers.
learn more
GRADES
3-4
$4.99 $5.99

Blockquote

Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you. Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you. Keep your face always toward the sunshine - and shadows will fall behind you.

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The Quick Brown Fox (cont.)

When we choose typefaces for body text, we consider many things. Does the family have enough weights and styles for the text we're typesetting (for example, are there italic and bold variations)? All of those considerations help us decide on typefaces that are appropriate for a given project. But more objectively, identifying good body text typefaces means looking for three things: sturdy shapes, even color, and an active texture. Let's practice looking for these things.

2. Greater Responsibility

  • Typefaces made for body text use are designed to be easily and comfortably read at small sizes, so their glyph shapes are intentionally subtle and sturdy. Look for typefaces with high x-heights and few frills. Distinctive glyphs are distracting, and delicate shapes can be lost at small sizes due to the coarseness of rendering environments. Small x-heights are a problem for body text, because they draw too much attention to capitals and extenders.
  • Typefaces made for body text use are designed to be easily and comfortably read at small sizes, so their glyph shapes are intentionally subtle and sturdy. Look for typefaces with high x-heights and few frills. Distinctive glyphs are distracting, and delicate shapes can be lost at small sizes due to the coarseness of rendering environments. Small x-heights are a problem for body text, because they draw too much attention to capitals and extenders.
  • Typefaces made for body text use are designed to be easily and comfortably read at small sizes, so their glyph shapes are intentionally subtle and sturdy. Look for typefaces with high x-heights and few frills. Distinctive glyphs are distracting, and delicate shapes can be lost at small sizes due to the coarseness of rendering environments. Small x-heights are a problem for body text, because they draw too much attention to capitals and extenders.
  • Typefaces made for body text use are designed to be easily and comfortably read at small sizes, so their glyph shapes are intentionally subtle and sturdy. Look for typefaces with high x-heights and few frills. Distinctive glyphs are distracting, and delicate shapes can be lost at small sizes due to the coarseness of rendering environments. Small x-heights are a problem for body text, because they draw too much attention to capitals and extenders.
Creativity
Sorting and Classifying
Patterns
Fine Motor Skills
Age 1
Infant
Age 4
Age 3
Age 2

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