{{lfctrl.headTitleStep1}}

{{lfctrl.headCopyStep1}}

An Email Is Headed
Your Way

We've sent a message
so you can pick a new password.

Reset Your Password

Think of a password that is at least 6 characters long.

Success! You now have a new password.

Please be sure to memorize it or write it in a safe place.



Wait!

Are you sure you want to exit?
Your password will not be reset!

{{lfctrl.notice}}


Wait!

Are you sure you don't want to finish?
You're almost done!

We are missing your email address.

Please enter your or your parent's email address. We will only use your email address to reset your password should you forget it.

Sign Up for Free E-Newsletters

(Optional)

You're Signed up for {{nlctrl.form.newsletters.join(',')}}

The next newsletter will arrive in your inbox within a few weeks.

hey, {{userData.username}}!

Edit Your Profile

SORRY!

You can only put stickers
where you see the dotted
circles.

ADD MY STICKER

WAIT!

You have to sign in,
first!

ALL SERIES
HIDE
Experiments

Tiny Tornados

What You Need:

• 2 two liter plastic bottles
• Duct tape
• Towel
• Pencil
• Water
• A friend who’s a tornado fan


Question: How can you make a model of a tornado?

1) First, fill one of the bottles 1/3 with water.

2) Then, dry the neck of the bottle with the towel.

3) Cover the mouth of the bottle with duct tape.

4) Now, use the pencil to punch a hole in the tape.

5) Line up the necks of the two bottles and then tape them together.

6) Now, hold the bottle with the water on top while your friend holds the middle of the empty bottle on the bottom.

7) Here’s the tricky part. The two of you work together to swirl the joined bottles in circles. The bottles should stay upright while you swirl them.

8) The friend holding the bottom bottle should pump or squeeze the bottle. This will make a water funnel form.

9) Once the funnel has formed set the bottles on a table. Hold them steady as you watch a tornado twirl right before your very eyes!


A Scientific Explanation:

The swirling action of the water represents the familiar high winds and funnel of a tornado. The water draining from the top bottle is like the low air pressure, or vacuum, that keeps a tornado in motion.


EXTRA! EXTRA!

Find out why the United States experiences more tornadoes than any other place in the world. Then amaze your friends with your terrific tornado facts!