{{lfctrl.headTitleStep1}}

{{lfctrl.headCopyStep1}}

An Email Is Headed
Your Way

We've sent a message
so you can pick a new password.

Reset Your Password

Think of a password that is at least 6 characters long.

Success! You now have a new password.

Please be sure to memorize it or write it in a safe place.



Wait!

Are you sure you want to exit?
Your password will not be reset!

{{lfctrl.notice}}


Wait!

Are you sure you don't want to finish?
You're almost done!

We are missing your email address.

Please enter your or your parent's email address. We will only use your email address to reset your password should you forget it.

Sign Up for Free E-Newsletters

(Optional)

You're Signed up for {{nlctrl.form.newsletters.join(',')}}

The next newsletter will arrive in your inbox within a few weeks.

hey, {{userData.username}}!

Edit Your Profile

SORRY!

You can only put stickers
where you see the dotted
circles.

ADD MY STICKER

WAIT!

You have to sign in,
first!

ALL SERIES
HIDE
g Go Back

Jean Fritz

Born: Hankow, China

Current Home: Dobbs Ferry, United States of America

Jean Fritz
The first 13 years of my life I lived in China. My parents were missionaries there, and I was an only child. Often I felt lonely and out of place. Writing for me became my private place, where no one could come. While we lived in China, my parents often spoke fondly of their memories in the United States, and my father shared fascinating tales about American heroes. I began to form strong emotional bonds to the United States. I developed a homesickness that made me want to embrace not just a given part of America at a given time, but the whole of it. My interest in writing about American history stemmed originally, I think, from a subconscious desire to find roots - I felt like a girl without a country. I have put down roots quite firmly by now, but in the process I have discovered the joys of research and am probably hooked. The question I am most often asked, is how do I find my ideas? The answer is: I don't. Ideas find me. A character in history will suddenly step right out of the past and demand a book. Generally people don't bother to speak to me unless there's a good chance that I'll take them on. And throughout my forty years of writing, I have taken on plenty of people, starting with George Washington in The Cabin Faced West. As a biographer, I try to uncover the adventures and personalities behind each character I research. Once my character and I have reached an understanding, then I begin the detective work — reading old books, old letters, old newspapers, and visiting the places where my subject lived. Often I turn up surprises, and of course, I pass them on.