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Alycia

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I live in New Jersey

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Genia

I live in Michigan

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Kriscia

I live in California

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Brian

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Spark Summer Reading With Teasers

By Kriscia Cabral on May 29, 2014
  • Grades: PreK–K, 1–2, 3–5, 6–8

For my final post this school year, I’d like to share a creative idea that will help wind down your classroom read-alouds while encouraging summer reading for your students. I’m also excited to share that there will be more to come from me next school year, as Scholastic has asked me to return for another year. Read on to see how previewing a book can go a long way in capturing your students' attention, AND catch a sneak peek at what is to come from me in August.

This exciting reading lesson came from the great Cathy Lachel, a teammate of mine (and a wonderful educator you should follow on Twitter). Here is her idea for end-of-year read-alouds that I have put in place with my fourth and fifth grade students:

Time was running away from us and I found myself in the middle of a great book that I knew we wouldn't finish. Instead of trying desperately to get through this one book, I decided to try something different. This unfinished book will now become one of many for our students to add to their summer reading list. I have decided to read one book for two days or so, until the end of the year. This way, I will expose the students to a variety of wonderful books of different genres and by different authors, all of which they can add to a summer reading list. There is no way we will ever get through all of the books, so giving the students just a taste of a variety of books will hopefully spark their interest and inspire them to find out what happens!

Thank you Cathy for sharing a fabulous way to end the year!

Some of the books I’ve read this year that I will be sharing with my students include:

Additionally, post a sign-up list for students to write down and share their recommended books with others. Spend a morning having students read from their favorite books to spark the interest of their classmates.

 

Up and Coming

Next year I will be blogging from a new location with a new grade level on my mind. I will be a second/third grade teacher at Design39Campus, a new PreK-8 school in the Poway Unified School District. Here I will focus my teaching on eight guiding principles and a vow to keep all learning experiences centered around student learning. Several posts I have planned for next year will be:

  • Setting up for the new year — what do you really need?

  • Effective collaboration

  • Creating essential questions for student learning

  • Portable bulletin boards

  • Tips and tricks for the C.O.W. (Computers On Wheels)

  • I have one iPad — now what?

And more to come! I’d love to keep in touch with you over the summer!

Follow me on Twitter.

 

Thank you for reading. Have a restful time away from the classroom. You certainly deserve it!

 

Smiles,

Kriscia

 

Comments (1)

Do you have a recommended number of pages to read to really draw the student in? I'm thinking when I preview an eBook, I usually get a couple of chapters, at which point I'm usually well hooked. Depending on the length of the chapters, that might be too long to allow each student to share out.

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