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Organizing the Information: My IDR Assessments Binder

By Beth Newingham on June 5, 2013
  • Grades: 3–5

As I began doing more Reading Workshop assessments in my classroom, I also realized I needed a very organized, easily accessible place to store all of the information I was collecting about each student. That is when I began developing a Reading Records Binder.

At the beginning of the binder, I keep forms where I record students' independent and instructional reading levels throughout the year. Since students move through levels throughout the school year, it is important for me to track their progress. This allows me to move students in and out of guided reading groups and also direct them to "just right" texts in the classroom library.

Download Guided Reading Levels—Instructional Level
Download Just Right Levels—Independent Level

Each student has his or her own section in the binder. Karen Bush, my good friend and teaching colleague, introduced me to colorful tabbed folders for my assessment binder. I used to use regular tabs and then include page protectors to hold any important information and examples of student work behind the student's tab.

Now that I have these tabbed pockets, I can insert things like the students' reading interviews, assessment webs, Fountas and Pinnell assessment forms, and other informative examples of their reading work right into the pockets for easy access when doing report cards or meeting with parents during conferences.

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